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At Sochi Olympics, Israel is in… Europe!

Israel/Palestine
on 116 Comments

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The Sochi Olympics website showing Israel as a European country.
Click the image to enlarge.

 

My wife was reading the Sochi Winter Olympics website looking to see if Israel had any athletes in the games, but was unable to find that country in the list of participating nations.  I noticed that she had clicked on the map of Asia.  I told her, confidently, click on Europe.  She did and there was Israel nestled, to her astonishment, between Ireland and Italy, not between The Islamic Republic of Iran and Japan where one would expect.

Israel is a country that has always participated in European competitions and been part of European leagues.  Israeli singers compete in the Eurovision song contest.  Israel is a member of the European zone in the International Basketball Federation (FIBA)  and is grouped with European countries in the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) .

In fact FIFA not only lists Israel specifically as being part of the continent of Europe, but the FIFA website lists Jerusalem as its capital.  (See graphic below.)  According to UN Resolution 478, which was passed in 1980, Israel’s Jerusalem law which declares that city the undivided capital of the state is in violation of international law.   No nation has its Israel embassy in Jerusalem.

Why is Israel in these European competitions and federations and not with the other Asian countries?  I imagine it had something to do with Israel’s history of hostile relations with the Arab and Muslim nations in the Asian continent.  But it also must be because the Israelis preferred to be considered part of Europe and wanted to separate themselves from what they considered to be an inferior Middle Eastern culture.

Israelis, who were born in Europe or are descendants of Europeans, always identified with that continent.  Many of the founders of the state imagined the Jewish settlement project as a colonial extension of Europe.  Ironically, many Israelis are neither European nor Western in origin.  Probably a majority of Israel citizens, when you include the indigenous Palestinian population, are actually what is known as Eastern in Israel.  That is from North Africa or Asia.  Of course, when you count the occupied territories Israel is overwhelmingly non-European.

Israel is an exceptional nation in its flouting of the rules the rest of the world follows.  It violates international law with impunity so why would anyone object to the Jewish state being part of Europe if that is what it desires?  Well, maybe the world community should start looking into the impunity that Israel is given.

It is apparently difficult to force Tel Aviv to admit to its nuclear arsenal, to withdraw from the Palestinian land it occupies or to renounce its claim to Jerusalem as its undivided and eternal capital.  Maybe the world could start addressing Israeli injustice and exceptionalism by, at least, requesting that it recognize itself not as a Jewish state, or a European nation, but as a part of Asia where it is located.

It has often been suggested that in order for Israel to live in peace with its neighbors it must become an active member of the Middle East community of nations.

Participating in competitions with other Asian nations would be a good beginning.

Click to enlarge.

 FIFA lists Israel in the continent of Europe and Jerusalem as its capital.
Click the image to enlarge.

*******************************************

The Israelis at Sochi

Ever since the mass immigration from the former Soviet Union to Israel in the 90s brought world class skaters to the Jewish state, Israel has been participating in the Winter Olympics.  The team this year, as usual, is all Jewish and all foreign-born. This is not surprising since there is no real winter in Israel.  The Israeli team at Sochi consists of three Ukrainians, a Belgian and an American, participating in figure skating, speed skating and alpine skiing.

I am  following the pairs figure skating team of Evgeni Krasnopolski and Andrea Davidovich.   They struggled in the competition (see results  here and here), but ice skating is not so Jewish thus just being in the Olympics is impressive.

Davidovich who is only 16 was born in Vermont.  She appears to be at the beginning of a successful Olympic career.

*******************************************

P.S. The growing  outrageousness of Israeli demands and the increasing willingness of Western nations to appease the desires of the Jewish State  leads me to imagine reporting something like the following soon.

Controversy over the slalom competition

Last month, the Israel Skiing Association  petitioned the International Olympic Committee (IOC) to change the name of all slalom events.

According to the Israelis, the event was invented in biblical times by the Samaritans and it was called shalom racing.  The Samaritans held annual competitions on Mount Gerizim, which Israeli geologists say, was snow covered in winter in the days long before the onset of global warming.  It is claimed that the Samaritans and the Judeans participated in events called shalom, giant shalom and super gimmel.

The IOC initially rejected the Israel name change suggestion but has taken a more conciliatory approach toward the issue after a number of Jewish donors telephoned to suggest that not recognizing the original name of the event has the feint odor of anti-Semitism.

The IOC while rejecting the name change for 2014, said it will appoint a commission to study the issue and make recommendations for future games.  Israel is insisting that an Israeli be part of the commission.  The Israelis  also are participating in the Alpine events at Sochi under protest because of the IOC’s refusal to change slalom to shalom.

Ira Glunts
About Ira Glunts

Ira Glunts is a retired college librarian who lives in Madison, NY. His twitter handle is @abushalom

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116 Responses

  1. Maximus Decimus Meridius
    Maximus Decimus Meridius
    February 13, 2014, 10:23 am

    ”Why is Israel in these European competitions and federations and not with the other Asian countries?”

    In the case of football, at least, it’s because several of the countries in the Asian federation refuse to play against Israel. Under FIFA rules, every country has to be allowed to play international football in one federation, so I suppose UEFA seemed the obvious one. In a way it’s a good thing though. Israel is crap at football, and so they hardly ever qualify for major tournaments when up against the likes of Italy or Germany, and usually go out at the first hurdle when they do. They might manage it against minnows like Jordan, but they haven’t a chance in European competition because they’re so rubbish.

    • Mayhem
      Mayhem
      February 13, 2014, 11:18 pm

      In football most Middle Eastern countries refuse to play Israel, which is contrary to FIFA’s “Say No to Racism” campaign and Article 3 of the FIFA statute, which states that discrimination on account of “ethnic origin, gender, language, religion, politics or any other reason” is punishable by suspension or expulsion.

      Those countries that object to playing against Israel should be expelled from FIFA, which is run by a bunch of mealy-mouthed apologists.

      No doubt this abusive treatment of Israel explains why it is courted in Europe instead of with the demagogues of the Middle East.

      @Maximus, to mention the irrelevancy

      Israel is crap at football

      only demonstrates the rankness of your bias. You didn’t hear how Israel U-21 defeated England last year?

      • Maximus Decimus Meridius
        Maximus Decimus Meridius
        February 14, 2014, 6:40 am

        ”Those countries that object to playing against Israel should be expelled from FIFA, which is run by a bunch of mealy-mouthed apologists.”

        Oh, I completely agree. Israel should never have been awarded the junior tournament in 2013, given its appalling human rights record.

        ”No doubt this abusive treatment of Israel explains why it is courted in Europe”

        ”Courted in Europe” eh? Well, I suppose it’s a change from us being told how anti-semitic and ‘anti-Israel’ Europe is.

        ”You didn’t hear how Israel U-21 defeated England last year?”

        No, actually, I didn’t, because nobody takes these junior tournaments too seriously, which I suppose is why Israel was granted the right to host one. Fact is – not ‘bias’ – that Israel almost never qualifies for major tournaments, and on the rare occasions when it does, gets knocked out almost immediately. But if you want to say that one victory in a minor tournament makes up for the fact (again, fact, not ‘bias’) that Israel hasn’t qualified for a World Cup since 1974, feel free. It would hardly be the first time a Zionist has preferred illusion over reality.

  2. Krauss
    Krauss
    February 13, 2014, 10:29 am

    Is Georgia in Europe? Turkey? Russia?

    Georgia is not in Europe at all. Turkey is in Asia to a degree of over 95% of its land mass.
    Russia has over 70-80% of its land mass in Asia.

    Yet all these countries are in the same group, too. I’m not saying this legitimizes Israel in that group, but I am saying that whoever organized these things clearly had a very weird definition of what Europe is.

    • W.Jones
      W.Jones
      February 13, 2014, 10:44 am

      Georgia is arguably in Europe, as it’s in the Caucuses, and whites are “Caucasian”. It’s really a border land.
      Russia’s capitol and history is in Europe.

      I don’t know why Turkey is in Europe, unless the Asia league was too big.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 13, 2014, 7:31 pm

        Capital.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        February 14, 2014, 11:47 am

        Ankara is the capitol of Turkey
        http://www.easyshippingltd.co.uk/removals-turkey

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 15, 2014, 11:33 pm

        The fact that a website gets it wrong is hardly a reason for perpetuating the error.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        February 17, 2014, 1:53 am

        “This country bridges Europe and Asia geographically, it represents cultural synthesis of two continents. His home is in Ankara, the capitol of Turkey.”
        The America I Discovered – Page 275

        Query: What is a capitol? Where is Russia’s capitol? If it is in Europe, my sentence “Russia’s capitol and history is in Europe” is correct.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 17, 2014, 3:03 am

        CAPITOL
        a : a building in which a state legislative body meets
        b : a group of buildings in which the functions of state government are carried out

        Latin Capitolium, temple of Jupiter at Rome on the Capitoline hill

      • James Canning
        James Canning
        February 17, 2014, 7:44 pm

        But Moscow is Russia’s capital.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      Maximus Decimus Meridius
      February 13, 2014, 12:27 pm

      Europe has no legal boundaries (remind you of anyone, eh?) but the generally accepted idea is that Europe ends at the Ural mountains. By that definition, all of the mentioned countries are in Europe.

      By NO definition is Israel in Europe. It doesn’t even border a European country. It is, unambiguously, a part of Western Asia. If Israel is in Europe, then so too is Jordan and Lebanon. But somehow, I don’t think that would go down too well, do you?

      • piotr
        piotr
        February 15, 2014, 12:30 am

        Not really. Once you set the boundary at Ural mountains, there is still a gap between these mountains and the Caspian Sea, which is usually filled with Ural River. But then there is still a gap between the Caspian and Black seas. Luckily, there are Caucasian Mountains here, a nice natural boundary. Further south there are no really natural boundaries, and Asiatic Turkey really has to be in Asia, since the original “Asia” was part of it (original “Africa” was in Tunisia).

        As far as Jordan/Israel is concerned, there is a tectonic boundary there. Jordan is in Arabian Plate and Israel (and Lebanon) in African Plate. So perhaps Israel should go to Africa?

    • SimoHurtta
      SimoHurtta
      February 14, 2014, 6:30 am

      The borders of Europe have been clear for hundreds of years. Under the commonly used definitions, the border between Asia and Europe stretches along the Ural Mountains, Ural River, and Caspian Sea in the east, the Greater Caucasus range and the Black Sea, with its outlets, the Bosporus and Dardanelles, in the south. Based on that division, Azerbaijan, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia and Turkey have territory both in Europe and Asia.

      In all cases Israel has nothing to do with Europe. Of Israel’s landmass 0% are in Europe. Actually it delegitimizes Europe if Israel is allowed to join our European “clubs”. Palestine must then given access as a European country to all same sport, culture, business etc organizations where Israel is allowed to called as a European country. So should Lebanon and Syria which are actually closer to Europe than Israel is. And lets not forget Jordan as part of “Europe”.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 14, 2014, 7:30 am

        SimoHurtta:

        The borders of Europe have been clear for hundreds of years.

        Europe is not just a defined territory. Europe is an idea. Israel was conceived and founded by Europeans, supported by Europeans. Israel wants to be–is– part of the European idea– actually part of a more encompassing idea– “Western civilization”.

      • SimoHurtta
        SimoHurtta
        February 14, 2014, 8:09 am

        Höpöhöpö – in Finnish polite form of “bulshit”. The borders of that old historic territory called Europe have been clear and defined for centuries. Europe is no “idea” which Israeli Jews can bend and stretch how they will in their propaganda. What Israeli Jews want is not relevant with definitions what is Europe or European. An Israeli Jew born in Israel to Jewish parents living there is an Asian, not European.

        Israel was established by European Jews. No doubt of that. But so have many other countries around of the world. Is Argentina for example part of your “idea of Europe”?

        It is very important to kick Israel out of all possible European organizations. Or then Palestine and other Israel’s neighbors must be included. And Argentina. It would be racist not accept them if Israel is allowed to be a “European member” but not them.

        If Israeli Jews want to be Europeans they can use their second or third passport and move form Asia to Europe. What about using the “idea of Antarctica” and Israel joining the “idea” of that region? Then there is no reasons to fight with others and Israel can form all the “Antarctica” organizations it wants. Being the only member has benefits. The is Israel is always the first.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 14, 2014, 10:06 am

        ‘Europe’ and European identity are not immutable historical and geographical givens, but rather form a historically and spatially mobile matrix.

        https://councilforeuropeanstudies.org/files/Perspectives/Spring2013/s3_Wintle.pdf

      • SimoHurtta
        SimoHurtta
        February 14, 2014, 5:15 pm

        Sibarak what on earth has a couple of sentences picked the Council of European Studies (what ever it is) paper to do with the land borders of Europe and the definition of the old continent Europe? As said it is not for Israeli Jews decide what the continent of Europe and European mean.

        I also could “dig” from internet interesting studies and quotes of definitions of Jews and Israel. Would you believe in the in a couple sentences deliberately handpicked from a paper of Council of Zionist Studies located in Teheran?

        Must we really because this Israel is in Europe welcome the Middle East as part of “Europe”. If we claim that Jews born and living in Israel are Europeans, can we say to Palestinians in Israel and occupied areas, that you are not Europeans? If your ancestors left that potato farm in Poland 100 years ago and moved to Palestine, does it mean, that you are still Polish and a European? Really?

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 14, 2014, 8:21 am

        @ Sibiriak

        Europe is an idea? Of what? A bunch of people who don’t seem to like each other very much getting on (kind of) because they’ve finally learned that trying to kill each other just doesn’t work?

        Sorry I’m not being argumentative but I honestly don’t see what the “European Idea” is. Maybe because living here I see the countries and not the whole thing.

        And as for Israel being “European” etc. – well that’s another example of Zionist schizophrenia. They HATE Europe and Europeans as the comments on YNet and other sites show and yet they still want to be classed as Europeans themselves. Strange lot Zionists.

      • pineywoodslim
        pineywoodslim
        February 14, 2014, 9:23 am

        By that standard, Canada, the US, Australia, and New Zealand are part of Europe?

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 14, 2014, 9:52 am

        pineywoodslim :

        By that standard, Canada, the US, Australia, and New Zealand are part of Europe?

        No. Europe, the U.S., Canada etc. are part of a larger imagined community– “Western Civilization”.

      • Maximus Decimus Meridius
        Maximus Decimus Meridius
        February 14, 2014, 11:53 am

        Australia was also ‘conceived and founded by Europeans’. The percentage of people of European descent who live there is higher than in Israel. Unlike Israelis, Australians are also mostly Christian and speak a European language. If Israel can be considered ‘European’, why not Australia?

  3. amigo
    amigo
    February 13, 2014, 10:42 am

    “It is claimed that the Samaritans and the Judeans participated in events called shalom, giant shalom and super gimmel.”

    Please keep this murderers and land thieves where they belong.

    They claim they are prevented from being part of the Middle East and just want to welcomed but it appears they also want to be part of Europe.

    As a European, I say keep them out of our neighborhood.We have more than enough trouble maker,s and whiners here already, thank you very much.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      Maximus Decimus Meridius
      February 13, 2014, 1:05 pm

      ”They claim they are prevented from being part of the Middle East and just want to welcomed but it appears they also want to be part of Europe.”

      Exactly.

      Plus, they say they have the better claim to Palestine because they are the direct descendants of the Jews who lived there two millenia ago (yah sure!), yet still they are ”European”? Which is it?

      Never mind that about half of Israeli Jews are of (recent) Middle Eastern origin, and that the Ashkenazi Jews probably have very little genetic linkage to the region at all.

    • Shuki
      Shuki
      February 13, 2014, 3:47 pm

      Please keep this murderers and land thieves where they belong.

      They claim they are prevented from being part of the Middle East and just want to welcomed but it appears they also want to be part of Europe.

      As a European, I say keep them out of our neighborhood.We have more than enough trouble maker,s and whiners here already, thank you very much.
      **

      Where exactly is it that we “belong” if not in Israel or Europe?

      No bigotry to see here… move along now.

      Phil & Ira… yosher coach to you both. Here is a glimpse into the hatred you stoke.

      Disgusting

      • amigo
        amigo
        February 14, 2014, 8:12 am

        “Where exactly is it that we “belong” if not in Israel or Europe? “shuki

        That,s easy.

        Behind the self declared borders of 1948.

        Where is the bigotry???.

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 14, 2014, 8:43 am

        @ Shuki

        “Here is a glimpse into the hatred you stoke.”

        What you mean like this little lot:-

        Of the SodaStream factory

        “I hope they fire all the palestinian workers first if they need to downsize.”

        On the Palestinian people:-

        their idea of a just outcome is one in which there is no more Israel and the Jews are driven into the sea.

        No more Israel fair enough (who could blame them) but driving all the people into the sea? Actually as you well know it’s your lot doing that to the Palestinians.

        To a Jewish person who disagrees with you.

        “If you weren’t so blinded by your self-loathing….”

        On Muslims who have the temerity to want to travel.

        “Wow, imagine that… The Muslim travelers pose the greatest security risk.”

        Wow imagine that – a Jew who wants to be a banker……

        On writing you don’t like apparently it’s the ethnicity of the author that’s the root of the problem

        ….a writer of Palestinian descent….

        On pardoning mistreatment of Muslims

        Why is it okay that it’s happening to Muslims?

        One has to question the sanity of someone who asks this question, even rhetorically, on the anniversary of 9/11.

        Because ALL Muslims are culpable for the actions of a handful of nutters apparently. You do know you guys killed Jesus right? So it’s OK to mistreat Jews over that too?

        I could go on but your boundless xenophobia and all round unpleasantness makes even looking at a mere fraction of your output nauseating in the extreme.

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 14, 2014, 8:44 am

        @ Shuki

        Where exactly is it that we “belong” if not in Israel or Europe?

        Well not amongst civilised people that’s for sure.

    • MahaneYehude1
      MahaneYehude1
      February 13, 2014, 4:32 pm

      @Amigo:

      As a European, I say keep them out of our neighborhood. We have more than enough trouble maker,s and whiners here already.

      Could you, please, specify who are those trouble makers and whiners?

      • Sumud
        Sumud
        February 13, 2014, 7:13 pm

        Could you, please, specify who are those trouble makers and whiners?

        Are you fishing for a compliment Mahane…?

      • MahaneYehude1
        MahaneYehude1
        February 14, 2014, 12:07 am

        @Sumud:

        Are you fishing for a compliment Mahane…?

        No, I received yesterday too many compliments (in Schulz thread) and don’t need more. I am curious to know who are those trouble makers and whiners in amigo comment, the same amigo who always says that we are racists.

      • rightcoaster
        rightcoaster
        February 14, 2014, 9:10 am

        Hi, RoHa — I figured you’d be here. The Reply feature of a previous thread was disabled, but since all threads on this website are equivalent, this on “peoplehood” fits as well here:
        February 12, 2014 at 9:55 pm

        RC: “Americans of Italian descent think of themselves as Italian, as well as American, and retain as little Italian as 3rd-gen Jews retain Yiddish or Ladino. Polish-Americans who have never been anywhere near Poland are Polish to themselves.”

        RH: “But are you saying that if a bunch of disparate people think of themselves as “one people”, then they are “one people” in the normal sense?

        If so, what happened to all the stuff about common culture, common language, and so forth, that was supposed to be the criterion for “peoplehood”?”

        If you look up the definition on-line, you will find that the definition seems to be a matter of mutual identification, and no specific criteria or parameters are given. So, if I identify and am reciprocally identified, that appears to suffice, and if it’s good enough for Italians and Indians and Chinese, and Irish once a year, it oughta be good enough for Jews. The difference is that Jewishness is not entirely ethnic, it can be entirely confessional. I don’t know how to become part of the Japanese people, but maybe if I lived in Kyoto for long enough and got good enough with chopsticks and raw fish, I’d self-identify as Japanese. The reciprocity of the racially hyper-conscious Japanese, however is in doubt. Israelis, despite the venom spewing constantly from Mondoweiss acolytes, are far more welcoming. For example, nobody even pays jizya.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 13, 2014, 8:48 pm

        Perhaps it would be easier for Amigo to compile a list of those Israelis who are not trouble makers and whiners, since it would be a much shorter list.

      • amigo
        amigo
        February 14, 2014, 8:20 am

        “Could you, please, specify who are those trouble makers and whiners?” mehane club

        Go look in the mirror spud.

        So tell me , what,s racist about not wanting a bunch of Land thieving , supremacist religious fanatics in one,s neighborhood.

        And that only accounts for the illegal squatters.Then add all the racist Israeli Jews who drive on Jews only roads and live in Jews only housing often built on the demolished houses legally owned by Palestinians.

        And BTW, you are a racist.You are just too full of self denial to recognize that fact.Get lost zio.

    • Ecru
      Ecru
      February 14, 2014, 3:28 am

      @ amigo

      As a European, I say keep them out of our neighborhood.

      Could I second that but with the added qualifier that all Israelis with European passports should have those passports rescinded and a put on a no-entry list.

  4. American
    American
    February 13, 2014, 10:51 am

    ”Maybe the world could start addressing Israeli injustice and exceptionalism by, at least, requesting that it recognize itself not as a Jewish state, or a European nation, but as a part of Asia where it is located.”

    ”The Israelis also are participating in the Alpine events at Sochi under protest because of the IOC’s refusal to change slalom to shalom.”
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    LOL. I am almost speechless. Maybe someday the Zionist/Israeli contribution to the world will be as specimens to be studied by sociologist, psychologist and scientist. They made up themselves as a people, made up their own version of world history, made up a whole ‘alternate universe’ that is contradictory to the real universe and moved lock, stock and barrel into that alternate universe.

    • Bumblebye
      Bumblebye
      February 13, 2014, 12:12 pm

      Oops, I think you missed a bit – your second quote is from Ira’s spoof!

      • DaveS
        DaveS
        February 13, 2014, 12:57 pm

        I would have been shocked if no one misinterpreted Ira’s very funny spoof as truth. First of all, despite its absurdity, it simply is not too implausible to imagine such a claim being made. Secondly, I know from personal experience that big bold block letters warning SATIRE or SARCASM are usually required, or even some highly intelligent people will get taken in. I myself missed the italicized preface at first.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        February 13, 2014, 3:10 pm

        No, but that is the reality American lives in, for serious.

      • American
        American
        February 13, 2014, 6:00 pm

        tokyobk says:
        February 13, 2014 at 3:10 pm
        No, but that is the reality American lives in, for serious.>>.

        I do live in reality, you otoh live in that alternate universe I mentioned.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        February 13, 2014, 7:26 pm

        Sarcasm is possible when there are extremes to ridicule.
        When you live at an extreme sarcasm is not possible.
        Hence, what is obviously a cartoonish representation for humorous effect is taken by you as reality. Btw every ATM transaction in the world automatically sends one penny to the Elders.

      • American
        American
        February 13, 2014, 5:58 pm

        Bumblebye says:
        February 13, 2014 at 12:12 pm
        Oops, I think you missed a bit – your second quote is from Ira’s spoof!

        Yea but its so apt…..I cant imagine why the Zios havent demanded the change.lol

  5. HarryLaw
    HarryLaw
    February 13, 2014, 11:08 am

    According to Wikipedia Israel does have a Ski resort complete with ski lifts etc, on Mt Hermon, indeed the IDF have an alpinist unit specializing in mountain warfare and use Mt Hermon for training http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alpinist_Unit Of course UNSC Resolution Number 497 [December 1981] declared “that the acquisition of territory by force was inadmissible and that Israels decision to impose its laws, jurisdiction and administration in the Golan Heights is null and void and without legal effect”. When was the last time Israel complied with International Law? Anyone suggesting they do is a bigoted, anti-Semite trying to delegitimize Israel. Can we look forward to the next winter games in Israel/Syria?

  6. marc b.
    marc b.
    February 13, 2014, 11:14 am

    Reviews of ‘Israel has Moved’, by Diana Pinto, which, unfortunately, I haven’t been able to read yet. it appears to describe the schizophrenic schism that will be part of Israel’s undoing. post-modernist uber-hip transcendence of geography coupled with ‘biblical rootedness’ to a patch of land. sometimes contradictions produce complexity, and sometimes psychopathy.

    [Pinto] presents impressions and interviews that reveal both Israeli truculence to go its own road as well as deep schisms within Israeli society. The author’s vivid characterizations of Israeli society expose its deeply problematic nature: as ‘autistic,’ in that its brilliant young people and leaders operate within a self-contained obliviousness of others; as a ‘realm of collective psychosis’ in thinking, as ultranationalist religious Zionists do, that the Temple in Jerusalem could ever be rebuilt, since it would obliterate the Dome of the Rock, a holy site for Muslims; as a postmodern Utopia in its scientific and genetic advances; as a ‘very large and ultrasophisticated aquarium’ containing exotic fishes, all ‘turning rapidly away to avoid the others, and all of this in utter silence.’ From the choosing of which road to take into Jerusalem (through heroic landmarks or the less-traveled Route 443 leading to various Arab exits) to the country’s spectacular embrace of high technology and Asian investment, which offer a glaring juxtaposition to the pre-modern lifestyles of the ultraorthodox, everywhere Israel is awash in contradictions. But does Israel really care who thinks so? Fewer and fewer sophisticated Israelis bother to envision a two-state solution, and Pinto fears that this solipsism is engendering a dangerous “self-satisfaction bordering on hubris”–and it can’t last…A solid work of intellectual criticism. (Kirkus Reviews 2012-12-01)
    This book takes Israel’s built environment as a departure point to offer broader reflections on shifts in the nation’s psyche, sometimes to brilliant and startling effect. Diana Pinto delineates the physical landscape of present-day Israel–its highways, restaurants and shopping malls–using it to describe the country as it is, not as the rest of the world would like it to be…Pinto’s acute–and, in my view, apt–diagnosis of Israel’s defining ailment is that it is ‘autistic’: trapped inside its own increasingly comfortable, security-defended bubble, unable to connect with–much less identify with–its neighbors, starting with the Palestinians…Overall, the effect is of enjoying an engaging and trenchant dinner party conversation with an intelligent traveller brimming with impressions from a trip. (John Reed Financial Times 2013-03-24)

    It’s rare for any book nowadays to cast totally new light on the Israel-Palestine conflict, but Diana Pinto’s Israel Has Moved does just that. She argues that the political, military and financial elite of Israel are turning away from Europe and even from America, which they regard as mired in economic difficulties and riven by ideological contradictions, and are looking to align themselves with those regimes in the Far East, China in particular, which have, like them, scant regard for human rights and a fierce determination to succeed economically and politically. Written out of a profound reverence for Enlightenment values, this desperately sad yet elegant and witty book asks us to contemplate the possibility that the Enlightenment, far from gradually conquering the globe, may, after 250 years, be slowly dying before our eyes. (Gabriel Josipovici Times Literary Supplement 2013-11-29)

  7. ThorsteinVeblen2012
    ThorsteinVeblen2012
    February 13, 2014, 11:33 am

    Even Apartheid South Africa was not afforded the status of being a European state.

  8. Bumblebye
    Bumblebye
    February 13, 2014, 12:34 pm

    Well, what can we expect from Israel! They haven’t even got the camel thing right!
    The Grauni’s Andrew Brown says:

    The Old Testament’s made-up Camels are a probem for Zionism

    ” “Then the servant left, taking with him 10 of his master’s camels loaded with all kinds of good things from his master. He set out for Aram Naharaim and made his way to the town of Nahor. He made the camels kneel down near the well outside the town; it was towards evening, the time the women go out to draw water.”

    But these camels are made up, all 10 of them. Two Israeli archaeozoologists have sifted through a site just north of modern Eilat looking for camel bones, which can be dated by radio carbon.

    None of the domesticated camel bones they found date from earlier than around 930BC – about 1,500 years after the stories of the patriarchs in Genesis are supposed to have taken place. Whoever put the camels into the story of Abraham and Isaac might as well have improved the story of Little Red Riding Hood by having her ride up to Granny’s in an SUV.”

    http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/andrewbrown/2014/feb/13/old-testament-camels-zionism-genesis

    • tokyobk
      tokyobk
      February 13, 2014, 2:09 pm

      Pretty funny pile-on fail. The discovery by -Israeli- scientists shows how confused Israel is.

      And its not a problem for Zionism, whose problems are apparent and don’t need carbon-dating, its a problem for Judaism and Islam and Christianity all of which take the OT narrative as history.

      “The archaeologists, Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen, used radiocarbon dating to pinpoint the earliest known domesticated camels in Israel to the last third of the 10th century B.C.”

      In fact, this has been argued by bible critics since the mid 1800s.

      • gamal
        gamal
        February 13, 2014, 3:33 pm

        “its a problem for Judaism and Islam and Christianity all of which take the OT narrative as history.”

        as is so often the case when discussing Abrahamism, Islam is lumped unthinkingly with Christianity, Islam specifically does not accept the OT “history” to which it does some epistemic violence, where in the OT does Haman (Hayman?) advise Pharoah, as he does wonderfully anachronistically as in Surat al Qasas, the Stories, draw your own conclusion, Islam while accepting Judaism as a divine religion does not accept the Biblical narrative as authentic, there is no choseness or super secessionism in the Quran either. Ta Sin Mim.

        http://quran.com/28

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        February 13, 2014, 5:36 pm

        Well, sure, sorry for the shorthand. More specifically, I should say literal readings of the holy texts as history are a problem for the major religions, most of which opt for reinterpretations of words and intent as science progresses. Of course each text has its own stories and claims.

        That said, a challenge to the historicity of Abraham, is indeed as much of a challenge to Islam as it is Judaism.

        Haman in Judaism does not appear in the five books of the Torah but in the Book of Esther which is in the “Writings,” the third collection of texts.

        If you take the texts and the oral traditions there are not only inconstancies (or exciting problems to resolve if you believe the overall picture) across the religions but inside them as well.

      • MHughes976
        MHughes976
        February 13, 2014, 4:20 pm

        Camel-scepticism seems to have been put on the map by WF Albright in the 1950s, by way of a minor exception to his generally neo-fundamentalist account of patriarchal history, but he went for a rather earlier date for the first domestication of these beasts. The recent observations suggest that domesticated camels appeared even later than he thought. And I do think that placing this major technological advance around 900 is plausible, helping to explain the much greater influence of Iraqi-based kingdoms in Palestine after that date. There is nothing new in Israeli archaeologists and historians’ raising radical questions about Biblical history in all sorts of ways – Israel Finkelstein most prominently, I suppose. It is part of the spirit of Zionism to be progressive and sceptical one minute while fiercely proclaiming Bible truth the next. I noticed that one MK, former police chief Levi, replied to the Euro provocation by saying that the ruins of the Temple Mount show that ‘this land is ours’.

    • ThorsteinVeblen2012
      ThorsteinVeblen2012
      February 13, 2014, 2:32 pm

      If the Old Testament isn’t a history

      And it doesn’t seem to be a very good moral guide on how to live with one another

      How can it still be a land deed?

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        February 13, 2014, 2:48 pm

        Its not a relevant land deed, of course.

        Are the holy books history? Sort of. Sometimes. Not perfectly. We learn a lot about the time they were written. To me, that is the most interesting things. Camels were important at the time the Torah was written or the first stories from it told. Greek science was available to 7th century Arabs as we know from its appearance in the Qur’an. The book of Mormon was written in the English of King James since that is what sounded biblical to 19th century Americans.
        Zionism was a secular movement rejected at the time by most rabbis.

        Shlomo Sand observed that Herzl’s first choice was not Basel but Munich but he was blocked by a group of rabbis who hated Zionists and thought they were dangerous.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel
        February 13, 2014, 4:29 pm

        blocked by a group of rabbis who hated Zionists and thought they were dangerous.

        The Association of German Rabbis (Orthodox and Reform) with only one dissenting voice (Rabbi Selig Gronemann of Strasbourg). Herzl naturally treated them with disdain (including a critique of their German), but theirs was a principled stand on religious and patriotic grounds, which cannot merely be dismissed as “hatred and [fear]” (Herzl also added “pandering”).

        Here’s the announcement they published against the planned congress, in a number of newspapers (German, bottom right): http://tinyurl.com/pqomfp3

        And Herzl’s critique (Hebrew): http://benyehuda.org/herzl/herzl_014.html

        They have Nordau to thank for the epithet Protestrabbiner, although theirs was certainly the majority view among religious leaders of all streams.

      • puppies
        puppies
        February 14, 2014, 7:46 am

        @Shmuel – Thank you for the document. I was shocked by point 3, where they say that they fully approve the “noble endeavor” of colonization by Jews in Palestine, considering that this has “no relationship at all with the founding of a nation-state” and does not interfere with a Jew’s primary loyalty to the country of his birth. These being Jewish religious rabbis, one could be excused for expecting a minimum of anticolonial feeling among them… nada.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel
        February 14, 2014, 8:13 am

        I was shocked by point 3, where they say that they fully approve the “noble endeavor” of colonization by Jews in Palestine … These being Jewish religious rabbis, one could be excused for expecting a minimum of anticolonial feeling among them… nada.

        Don’t let the word “colonisation” (which didn’t have quite the same connotations at the time) fool you. This was a period of extreme poverty and persecution of Jews in the Pale of Settlement (which also gave rise to the mass flow of immigration, particularly to the US). One of the solutions proposed and funded by West-European Jews (not necessarily Zionists – see e.g. Sand on Moses Montefiore) was productive settlement in Palestine (and elsewhere, e.g. Argentina) — definitely not as a political project and with no intention whatsoever of displacing the local population. Many staunch opponents of Zionism supported this very limited form of settlement (by no means a comprehensive solution to the problem), and in fact criticised Herzl’s movement for putting this project at risk with their political designs — causing the Turkish authorities to impose restrictions on Jewish immigration from outside the Ottoman Empire.

      • puppies
        puppies
        February 15, 2014, 12:07 am

        @Shmuel (still no Reply button) – I’m aware of all that. Remember that those years also were the years of Mark Twain’s spirited opposition to colonialism and the revolt of the Socialists, along with a number of religious leaders. A couple rabbis among them would have been nice.

      • James Canning
        James Canning
        February 16, 2014, 1:57 pm

        Didn’t Herzl originally favor conversion by Jews to Christianity?

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel
        February 15, 2014, 3:22 am

        I’m aware of all that.

        puppies,

        I think you are misconstruing the term “colonisation”. It merely refers to the establishment of agricultural communities. Some of these “colonies” were established in Europe itself (Ukraine, Bessarabia, Podolia, Crimea, etc,) and some overseas, such as Moisés Ville (Argentina) or the colonies in Palestine (which had the added advantage of helping the largely impoverished, charity-dependent, pre-existing Jewish population of Palestine).

        The German rabbis merely wished to make it clear that their opposition was specifically to the nationalist, political project of Zionism and not to the philanthropic efforts underway in the Holy Land.

        Were there rabbis who criticised what we would call colonialism, in the late 19th century? I don’t know, but that was not the subject of this particular decision/statment by the Rabbinerverbandes in Deutschland.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 16, 2014, 7:44 pm

        James Canning : “Didn’t Herzl originally favor conversion by Jews to Christianity??

        At one stage, again in 1893, he envisaged the general baptism of Jewish children, because the Jews must submerge themselves in the people. He wanted to appeal to the Pope: help us against antisemitism and I in return will lead a great movement amongst the Jews for voluntary and honourable conversion to Christianity.

        He envisaged a solemn festive procession to St Stephen’s Cathedral at noon on a Sunday, accompanied by the ringing of bells. The adult leaders of the community would be at the head of the procession, and would proceed to the threshold of the church. Though the leaders would stay outside, the others would embrace Christianity.

        These were just fantasies. It was pointed out to Herzl that, all other considerations apart, the Pope would never receive him.

        Walter Laqueur, “A History of Zionism”

      • James Canning
        James Canning
        February 17, 2014, 7:49 pm

        The Pope would not have welcomed numerous conversions to Roman Catholicism? And received the instigator?

    • Mayhem
      Mayhem
      February 13, 2014, 11:01 pm

      @bumblebye, please read the article “Guardian’s Andrew Brown ponders the connection between camels & Zionism” at http://cifwatch.com/ which points out:

      “First, the 21 (putatively erroneous) references to camels in the five books of Moses of course don’t undermine the remaining 79,826 words.

      “Second, Zionism is based not on the literal truth of every word in every Jewish text, but largely on the more than 3,000-year-old Jewish connection to the Land of Israel.

      “Further, modern Zionism was largely a secular movement.

      “Finally, though Brown’s assault on Israel’s legitimacy is arguably among the strangest we’ve ever encountered at this blog, we decided to humor him and set out our ‘crack team of researchers’ on a very peculiar mission to see if we were hasty in mocking the Guardian “journalist”.

      “However, as hard as “they” tried (using the most ‘sophisticated’ research tools), they quite curiously couldn’t find even one single reference to “camels” in Theodor Herzl’s The Jewish State, the transcripts from the first to twelfth Zionist Congresses, Israel’s Declaration of Independence, or Israel’s Basic Law.”

      It seems after all bumblebye that all of this proves that you are more than willing to swallow camel shit if it happens to serve your blind, anti-Israel cause.

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 14, 2014, 3:45 am

        @ Mayhem

        Zionism is based not on the literal truth of every word in every Jewish text, but largely on the more than 3,000-year-old Jewish connection to the Land of Israel.

        Since Judaism only dates from (at most) the 6th Century BCE where on earth does this “more than 3000 year” figure come from? Further if this 3000 year figure is derived from biblical pseudo-history and this pseudo-history has repeatedly been proven wrong (Jericho for example, Exodus for another) how can this 3000 year figure be at all trusted?

        And if it can’t be trusted that leaves the whole “Jewish connection to the land” of rather shaky foundations. And please, we’ve ALL seen the repeated claims of Jewish primacy to the land based on just this pseudo-history so don’t deny it.

      • Mayhem
        Mayhem
        February 14, 2014, 5:40 pm

        @ecru, if I conceded to you that verifiable Jewish history can currently only be dated back to the 6th century BCE, what f…ing difference does that make to the argument?

    • ziusudra
      ziusudra
      February 14, 2014, 1:57 am

      Greetings Bumblebee,
      …. None of the domesticated camel bones they found date from earlier than around 930BC……..
      Genesis has it wrong that Abraham rides a camel ca. 1700BC!
      The Archeologists tell true. Camels were first domesticated in the ME ca. 1K BC.
      Deuteronomist chutzpah!
      They write in Genesis, chap. 42 : the tribes pay for their seed in coins.
      Coins first came into used in the 7th C BC in Asia minor.
      Deuteronomist chutzpah!
      ziusudra

  9. Les
    Les
    February 13, 2014, 1:16 pm

    When the US moved Israel from CENTCOM to EUROCOM it was in recognition of Israel’s definition of itself as a white power country.

    • ToivoS
      ToivoS
      February 13, 2014, 8:05 pm

      Good point. It was also a recognition of Israel as a European colonial settler state.

  10. quercus
    quercus
    February 13, 2014, 1:19 pm

    I watched the opening ceremony of the Olympics and it seemed to me (although I will admit to knowing I would not cheer the Israelis athletes had I been in Sochi) the crowd became noticeably quiet when the Israeli group came in. I can’t find postings of the complete opening ceremony on youtube yet to confirm my impressions, but if anyone else watched the ceremony I wonder what they thought?

  11. hophmi
    hophmi
    February 13, 2014, 1:46 pm

    Israel was a member of the Asian Games Federation until 1981. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/European_Olympic_Committees

    There is one reason, and one reason only, that they are not still part of the Asian contingent, and that is the Arab states, who pressured the Asian Games Federation to exclude Israel. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olympic_Committee_of_Israel

    After 13 years of belonging nowhere, Israel became a member of the EOC.

    So the notion that Israel is in the European group because it wants to be is your own brand of abject nonsense, and your omission of the reason it’s there is your own brand of abject ignorance.

    • hophmi
      hophmi
      February 13, 2014, 2:23 pm

      Put through, please. This entire post is completely inaccurate.

    • Walid
      Walid
      February 13, 2014, 2:55 pm

      Hophmi is right on that one. Israel is classed with the Europeans for no other reason than the Arabs and eventually the Iranians refusing to play against Israel.

    • Woody Tanaka
      Woody Tanaka
      February 13, 2014, 3:04 pm

      “There is one reason, and one reason only, that they are not still part of the Asian contingent, and that is the Arab states, who pressured the Asian Games Federation to exclude Israel.”

      And rightly so. Given the vile history of attempted genocide, ethnic cleansing and repeated war-making on its neighbors, the zionist entity should be shunned by everyone. They should not be treated like a decent country in international competitions, as they are a fundamentally — ideologically — indecent state.

      The real shame is that the Europeans succumbed to the American and zionist pressure and didn’t shut them out completely. As a consequence, every Olympics, the world has to endure the defilement of the games when the zionist entity marches in, its athletes looking like they just got done beating up some child in the West Bank or murdering an innocent Gazan who was trying to pick up some scrap metal in the Warsaw-Ghetto-by-the-sea that the zionists have created.

    • Ira Glunts
      Ira Glunts
      February 13, 2014, 3:09 pm

      Michael (Hophmi), To be called ignorant by you, I consider to be an honor. Your posting here only reinforces the points that I and most of the contributors and commenters are making. I would not dignify your comment with an answer, but I will inform you that I permitted it to be posted.

      • hophmi
        hophmi
        February 13, 2014, 4:01 pm

        “Michael (Hophmi), To be called ignorant by you, I consider to be an honor. Your posting here only reinforces the points that I and most of the contributors and commenters are making. I would not dignify your comment with an answer, but I will inform you that I permitted it to be posted.”

        Well, many thanks. Your post was truly disingenuous, Ira. You could argue that Israel should be rejected from the EOC. That’s honest enough. But to assert that Israel is there by choice because it wants to be European rather than Asian, especially when the truth is exactly the opposite, that just discredits you, and of course, does nothing to help the Palestinians.

      • Sumud
        Sumud
        February 13, 2014, 7:26 pm

        But to assert that Israel is there by choice because it wants to be European rather than Asian, especially when the truth is exactly the opposite, that just discredits you, and of course, does nothing to help the Palestinians.

        Why does Israel participate in the Eurovision Song Contest?

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 13, 2014, 8:25 pm

        “Why does Israel participate in the Eurovision Song Contest?”

        Why should Arabs be the only ones to suffer?

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 13, 2014, 7:37 pm

        hophmi:

        But to assert that Israel is there by choice because it wants to be European…

        Is there any doubt in you mind that Israel’s political and cultural elite and much (most) of the population wish to identify with Europe, “the West”, “Western values”, “Western democratic prinicples” etc?

      • Daniel Rich
        Daniel Rich
        February 14, 2014, 12:09 am

        @ RoHa,

        Q: “Why does Israel participate in the Eurovision Song Contest?” – Why should Arabs be the only ones to suffer?

        R: Lmao. Hilarious!

  12. tokyobk
    tokyobk
    February 13, 2014, 1:54 pm

    Well Turkey was certainly thought of as Europe in the early 20th century by many as in “The sick man of…” In the late 20th century the continent of Eurasia existed.

    These sweeping geographical designations have always been political. The entire “Middle East” has more in common with Europe, whose religion, architecture etc… it shaped immeasurably than with East Asia. Europe and the ME have exchanged large populations several times over history as well.

    _Inventing Eastern Europe_ is worth reading on the subject of investing cultural meaning and hierarchy in borders that are always arbitrary and political.

    Japan has taken itself out of and placed itself into Asia several times, always for similar nationalist alignments and high culture club aspirations as in considering Israel to be European. Portuguese missionaries in the 17th century wrote that Japan was a white nation in Asia, because it had similar material attainments and wealth. etc…

  13. joer
    joer
    February 13, 2014, 2:47 pm

    Why shouldn’t Israel be considered European? After all, “Europe” is an ideology(of racism and world domination)-it certainly isn’t a continent. Anyone who looks at a map sees that it is an Asian peninsula. The barbarian hordes that raped and pillaged their way through Europe were eventually able to establish kingdoms and dominate the world through ruthlessness, the creativity of their sadism, and later, gunpowder. Their status as a continent is really the most benign result of their rise to power. Look at everything they have shared with mankind: imperialism, racism, exploitation, and more!. At least they learned that taking a bath wouldn’t kill them(which they did for centuries).

    …anyhow, Zionism is one of the most European ideologies I can think of. So why not?

    • Ecru
      Ecru
      February 14, 2014, 4:28 am

      @ joer

      WOW! You really hate Europeans don’t you. Sorry I just find this whole “Europeans were EVIL and everyone else a lovely quaint little innocent” thing amusing. And incredibly condescending.

      The barbarian hordes that raped and pillaged their way through Europe were eventually able to establish kingdoms and dominate the world through ruthlessness, the creativity of their sadism, and later, gunpowder.

      Would this be the Mongol hordes, the Huns, who? It may come as news to you but there were empires, civilizations and barbarians in other parts of the world too. All doing the same horrible things to each other. Look up the Xi’an Empire or Egypt, the Islamic invasion of Spain, of the Byzantine Empire for that matter. Or Persia. Or the Aztecs. Lot of very unpleasant things happened in the world that Europe had nothing to do with.

      Look at everything they have shared with mankind: imperialism, racism, exploitation, and more!

      Sorry to burst your bubble here but:-

      Imperialism – the earliest recorded Empires were Asian. Unless you want to count the unification of Upper and Lower Egypt in which case; African. Europeans were latecomers to the party.

      Racism – earliest records we have on racism are also Asian. Though I admit there’s a bit of a bias because they figured out writing first(ish). There was I’m sure “racism” in Europe too, but I view it more as a human thing than the property of a particular subset.

      Exploitation – Asia or Africa again sorry. Complex societies with stratified social structures. And empires of course. They got there first they did it first.

      At least they learned that taking a bath wouldn’t kill them(which they did for centuries).

      Sorry but that’s a highly exaggerated view of things, probably deriving from the religious literature that really didn’t like nudity. At all! However not only did Medieval etiquette include the need for personal cleanliness, there are medieval tapestries that show bathing quite clearly and Duerer did drawings of bath houses in the 15th century. And btw – don’t you think you’re forgetting the Romans here?

      Look Europe did many many incredibly cruel things whole chunks of them for centuries at a time, but they were hardly unique. And they were definitely not the first and I seriously doubt they’ll be the last.

      • joer
        joer
        February 14, 2014, 1:55 pm

        Sir or Madam:
        I assure you I do not hate Europe or any other land mass. First, to respond to the history lesson you generously shared with me, true, Europeans did not create the institutions I mentioned-which is true of much else they are given credit for. However, they did carry out plans of imperialism and exploitation to a degree that ancient emporers could not even imagine. And they did so using cruelty andgunpowder, justifying it with twin ideologies of racism and religion.

        But it is true that genocide and enslavement have occured without European involvement, but my comment was made in the context of Israel wanting to maintain the status of being a European country. If they wanted to claim they were an Ausralian country, my speculation about their reasoning would be different.

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 15, 2014, 4:52 am

        Well to be fair Joer based on your original post it did look like you needed a history lesson. I mean you did make something of a wide sweeping statement there.

        “[Europeans] did carry out plans of imperialism and exploitation to a degree that ancient emporers could not even imagine

        Beyond their abilities maybe but I’m not too sure given the size of some ancient non-European empires (China, Persia, Inca) it was beyond their imaginations. And the only reason Europeans were able to amass these huge empires was because technology and logistics had moved on. But do you know who still holds the record for largest land empire? The Mongols. Generally not considered European you average Mongolian.

        “And they did so using cruelty and gunpowder”

        Empires as a rule are not formed from being nice to people so Europeans are hardly exceptional there. Just take a look at the Assyrians. As for gunpowder – you’re not aware that it was invented and weaponised by the Chinese long before the Europeans got hold of it? And the Europeans were introduced to it (at the receiving end) by those Mongols I mentioned earlier. So again, not just Europeans using the stuff.

        …justifying it with twin ideologies of racism and religion…

        How do you explain the Roman Empire then? Racism yes but religion? Not really. And anyway, have a look at the founding philosophies of any empire and racism is never far away – it can’t be because Empire by its nature means one people (or more accurately their elite) justifying their rule over others. As for religion, can I introduce you to this thing called Islam?

        “…my comment was made in the context of Israel wanting to maintain the status of being a European country.”

        And that’s fair enough. But all you had to say was “in the tradition of European imperialism” (which it is) without seeming to single out all of Europe with some Mark of Cain type thing.

  14. Walid
    Walid
    February 13, 2014, 2:48 pm

    About the Israel-in-Europe thing, the only reason it’s in that category is because the Arabs refused to play against Israelis or to be in anything having to do with them because of the Arab boycott. If one day Israelis become honest people and conclude a peace deal with the Palestinians, the Europeans will surely move Israel back into Asia where it belongs. Hophmi is right about the Arab boycott having been behind decision to group Israel with Europeans, nothing other than that.

    From a CNN article last June discussing Israeli football:

    “… Israel used to be part of the Asian Football Confederation, even qualifying for the 1970 World Cup finals, until a boycott by its Arab neighbors forced the Israeli Football Association into the wilderness.
    It was eventually accepted as a permanent member of UEFA — European football’s governing body — in the 1990s. ”

    http://edition.cnn.com/2013/06/06/sport/football/israel-sarsak-uefa-u21-football/

    • Ira Glunts
      Ira Glunts
      February 13, 2014, 3:21 pm

      Walid, Your comment does not explain why Israel is a participant in Eurovision. Nor does it totally explain why the European nations permitted Israel to join their association. Nor does it explain there being listed with Europe in the Olympics.

      Also, I wonder if the Arab nations would continue to boycott Israel today, if asked to let Israel join the Asia Football Association. I do not know the answer, but given the present political reality my guess is that most would.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        February 13, 2014, 3:36 pm

        Ira,

        Other countries outside of the limited definition of Europe have participated as well. Apparently, anyone within reach of broadcast can participate.

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:EurovisionParticipants.svg

        I can understand why people committed to this issue feel that the Truth is stifled and that if people only knew they would join the cause exactly like activists here want them too.

        That can cause a kind of over-reach and pile-on, which I think this thread may be an example of, though there is no question that “Europe” is a designation that many in Israel have since its founding aspired to, for cultural and political reasons. I believe Herzl thought that the language of Israel should be a European one.

      • Walid
        Walid
        February 13, 2014, 11:45 pm

        Ira, they most probably would; most of them are are already in relations with the rogue state. Sports and other activities participation by Israel is becoming more frequent in Qatar and the UAE. But as you and others said, even if the Arabs were to “let them them play”, Israel would still want to stay with the Europeans because it believes it belong in that category. The only time Israel refers itself as being geographically in the ME is when it wants to repeat the lie that it’s the only democracy in that region. As to the argument that its people are from Europe, I believe that the majority of Israelis are of Mizrahi origin.

        It participates in the Eurovision and other such activities to come across as one of the Europeans and it gets away with it because of Europe’s holocaust guilt.

      • Ecru
        Ecru
        February 14, 2014, 4:29 am

        Eurovision’s about funding the company that puts it out and Israel’s a contributor so they get to compete.

  15. anthonybellchambers
    anthonybellchambers
    February 13, 2014, 3:31 pm

    The determination of Israel not to identify with other Semitic races but to emulate those in Europe reminds me of Michael Jackson’s sad rejection of his proud heritage by attempting to appear white.

    Israel is slap-bang in the centre of the Muslim Middle East, which is where it wanted to be regardless of the human suffering it caused by taking by force the land of the indigenous people of Palestine.

    Those Sabras, Israeli born, are not European whatever they may want to appear. They are Asians. Why they should want to appear that which they are not, is an indication of immaturity.

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      February 13, 2014, 8:43 pm

      “reminds me of Michael Jackson’s sad rejection of his proud heritage by attempting to appear white.”

      Why was the rejection “sad”? What makes the “heritage” proud? And if he had succeeding in appearing white (rather than weird) would it have been a bad thing to do so? If so, why?

      “Those Sabras, Israeli born, are not European whatever they may want to appear. They are Asians.”

      Those Americans, American born, are not Irish/Italian/Greek whatever they may want to appear. They are Americans. On that we are agreed.

      “Why they should want to appear that which they are not,sic is an indication of immaturity.”

      Why they should want to appear that which they are not is an indication that they see a benefit in so appearing. And, if they work hard at it, they may move from appearing to being. Such transitions are possible.

      (Also, the rule is, “No comma after subject clause.”)

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        February 13, 2014, 9:52 pm

        And sic should be in parentheses.

      • bintbiba
        bintbiba
        February 17, 2014, 5:26 am

        :-)

    • Walid
      Walid
      February 14, 2014, 12:32 am

      “Why they should want to appear that which they are not, is an indication of immaturity.”

      Not totally their fault, Anthony, they were made to believe that there was something unholy about their oriental roots and this inferiority that has become built-in has been passed to the next generation. You can see the difference in Israelis that are still very proud of their Iraqi heritage while there are others here that are practically ashamed of it and somewhat grateful it has been erased from them like with our friend Mahane, no matter what means were used to do it. Giving up their Jewish culture that predated Islam for a Zionist one that was taking off was a big mistake.

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      February 14, 2014, 2:23 am

      anthonybellchambers :

      The determination of Israel not to identify with other Semitic races

      There is no logical/empirical basis for such categories of “race”.

      Besides, most Jews that make up the “Jewish nation” have European (including Russian) roots and are not direct descendants of ancient Jews from “Eretz Israel”.

  16. a blah chick
    a blah chick
    February 13, 2014, 6:11 pm

    “Ever since the mass immigration from the former Soviet Union to Israel in the 90s brought world class skaters to the Jewish state, Israel has been participating in the Winter Olympics.”

    Russian athletes also seem to dominate their track and field teams. I’d be very interested to know what Israeli born athletes think about this.

    I was watching a heat of the 400 meters in London 2012 and saw a black guy with the very un-Hebraic name of Sanderson representing Israel. Turns out he was an African-American who married an Israeli woman. So, that makes it at least one black guy they don’t consider cancerous.

    • Walid
      Walid
      February 14, 2014, 12:48 am

      It brings to mind the Bermuda bobsled team.

      Anyone here remember ski-jumper Eddie (The Eagle) Edwards of the UK at the 88 Calgary Winter Olympics? He was fun to watch as a personality as jumping had nothing to do with it. Great story from the past:

      http://www.theguardian.com/sport/2014/feb/04/reappraising-eddie-eagle-winter-olympics-ski-jumping

      • ziusudra
        ziusudra
        February 14, 2014, 2:51 am

        Greetings Walid,
        Eddie (the eagle) Edwards.
        They had him on a talk Show here in Germany last night.
        I rolled on de floor. What a belly of laughs, but also a great character
        of determination w/o any skill or Training. He’s doing fine. Still appearing as Eddie the world over.
        ziusudra
        PS W/o much training, he went from naught to ski jumps of 120m long slides in 5 months, although he ne’er officialy got over 71 meters in distance.
        PPS The officials would not Permit a 2nd olympic of his because he stole the show from the professsionals.

    • Ecru
      Ecru
      February 14, 2014, 4:32 am

      So, that makes it at least one black guy they don’t consider cancerous.

      Well not while he’s competing. What they’ll say of him once he retires and is no longer useful to them is another matter.

  17. Daniel Rich
    Daniel Rich
    February 13, 2014, 7:10 pm

    When Israel impressed the heck out of Europe’s contestants during its run at the ‘Go Figure’ skating, set to the tune of ‘Nakba, Nagila Nakba’ , it was allowed to sing along Europe’s nightingales after the 1972 Munich debacle. No, nothing to do with guilt or anything…

  18. James Canning
    James Canning
    February 13, 2014, 7:40 pm

    Yes, Israel is in Asia. Great piece.

  19. DaBakr
    DaBakr
    February 13, 2014, 10:36 pm

    Pretty cynical to gripe about Israel not being in between “Iran and…” When Iran wont even field a Judo fighter to compete with his Israeli counterpart. When many of these nations that are supposed to separate sports from politics (just as Israel competes with and engages with Palestinians in the olympics as they will any competitor . When an Egyptian female wrestler is so filled with hatred for Jews that she resorted to a ‘Mike Tyson’ and BIT her Israeli rival (and the Israeli woman went on to win the match and did not file a complaint) . When ALL of these things are no longer status quo for Israel’s regional sports competitions THEN I will listen politely to griping about where exactly Israel is listed in the Olympics. In fact-I wouldnt be surprised if the COWARDLY Olympic committee bowed to pressure from certain Muslim nations that they would boycott the Olympics if Israel were listed with them. Its MUCH more likely then any other reason, including the racist ideology that Jews that wound up in eastern Europe are eother noty real jews or have no connection to Jerusalem.

    • Walid
      Walid
      February 14, 2014, 1:01 am

      DaBakr, what you are really after is not true sportsmanship from the Arabs and the Iranians, but plain and simple normalization, and which is the sole reason why Arabs and Iranians are against competing with Israelis. Jerusalem has nothing to do with it. You stopped short of invoking the big “H”.

    • ziusudra
      ziusudra
      February 14, 2014, 2:59 am

      Greetings Debakr,
      … the Israeli went on to win the match & did not file a complaint…..
      Can’t you conceive that Mankind could find Menschkeit in Jews?
      I’m sure there are millions in World Jewery that can find Menschkeit
      in Arabs &/or Muslims.
      It is Mankind’s ideologies that make Mankind ugly & inhumane.
      ziusudra

    • puppies
      puppies
      February 15, 2014, 2:22 am

      “including the racist ideology that Jews that wound up in eastern Europe are eother noty real jews or have no connection to Jerusalem.”

      What’s racist in that? First, as for being “real Jews” or not, I can’t see anyone contesting the right of a religious adherent of Judaism to call himself a Jew. Second, there is no evidence to tell where they “wound up” coming from, except for the West shore of the Caspian, where the historical record places them. Third, of course a religious Jew would have some imagined emotional “connection” to Jerusalem (Birobidjan is not mentioned in the O.T.) but not an irreligious one.
      Let’s come to the racism now: postulating, as you do, that “Jewishness” is not necessarily and intimately conditioned on one’s religious devotion is of course racist to the cube, creating an identity based on biological descent. Not only that, giving any force to some personal belief of “connection” to Jerusalem makes it insanity.

      • James Canning
        James Canning
        February 15, 2014, 3:00 pm

        Yes, what is “racist” about that comment. Is is “racist” to say the late Elizabeth Taylor’s right to “return” to Israel, had in fact no basis whatever in race?

      • puppies
        puppies
        February 16, 2014, 8:32 pm

        Dont tell me… did they manage to convert The Liz, too?

      • Sumud
        Sumud
        February 17, 2014, 1:51 am

        Dont tell me… did they manage to convert The Liz, too?

        Who is “they”? Sounds sinister.

        LT converted to judaism in 1959:

        Wikipedia: Elizabeth Taylor / Religion and identity

      • puppies
        puppies
        February 17, 2014, 6:06 pm

        @Sumud – I see in your link that she was converting from Christian Science.
        No upgrading / downgrading in matters of religiosity but surely shows a confused head (and justifies an unattributable “they”.)

      • James Canning
        James Canning
        February 17, 2014, 7:51 pm

        Sammy Davis, Jr., was another Hollywood star who converted to Judaism.

      • rightcoaster
        rightcoaster
        February 15, 2014, 10:13 pm

        puppies: “Second, there is no evidence to tell where they “wound up” coming from, except for the West shore of the Caspian, where the historical record places them.”

        RC: Wrong, as is now well known. DNA trumps. See following from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genetic_studies_on_Jews#Y-DNA_of_Ashkenazi_Jews:

        “…All relevant Y-DNA studies … have concluded that the majority of the paternal genetic heritage among Ashkenazim and other Jewish communities is similar to those found dominating Middle Eastern populations, and probably originated there. … Hammer et al.[29] concluded that the Y chromosome of most Ashkenazi and Sephardi Jews contained mutations that are also common among Middle Eastern peoples, but uncommon in the general European population. This suggested that the male ancestors of the Ashkenazi Jews could be traced mostly to the Middle East. …”

        On the other hand, this article says the mitochondrial DNA evidence points to European matrilineal origin for Ashkenazim (with Near East contributions), but repudiates any hint of Khazar origin:
        http://www.the-scientist.com/?articles.view/articleNo/37821/title/Genetic-Roots-of-the-Ashkenazi-Jews/

        So, no Caspian Sea. Sorry.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        February 16, 2014, 7:55 pm

        rightcoaster:

        On the other hand, this article says the mitochondrial DNA evidence points to European matrilineal origin for Ashkenazim (with Near East contributions), but repudiates any hint of Khazar origin.

        You are both cherry-picking and dishonestly misrepresenting evidence. The article does NOT say “the evidence points to….”; it discusses the pros and cons of a single study , and certainly does not “repudiate any hint of Khazar origin”.

        The article concludes with these two statements:

        Eran Elhaik, a research associate studying genetics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health, is split. He agreed with the study authors that the study rules out a Near Eastern origin for many mitochondrial lineages of the Ashkenazis but disagreed that it rules out a Khazarian contribution. “Jews and non-Jews residing in the regions of Khazaria are underrepresented, which biases the results toward Europe as we have seen in many other studies,” he said in an e-mail to The Scientist. Elhaik recently concluded from autosomal DNA that EUROPEAN JEWS DID, IN FACT, HAVE A KHAZARIAN BACKGROUND.

        David Goldstein, a geneticist and director of the Center for Human Genome Variation at the Duke University School of Medicine, said that the questions of whether there was a KHAZAR CONTRIBUTION to the Ashkenazi Jews’ lineage, or exactly what percentage of mitochondrial variants emanate from Europe, cannot be answered with certainty using present genetic and geographical data. Even if a set of variants are present in a specific region today, that doesn’t mean that the region always had that set of variants. Some variants could have been lost due to drift, or perhaps migration altered the balance of variants present in the population.

        So, the Khazar theory is still very much in play. Sorry.

      • puppies
        puppies
        February 16, 2014, 8:25 pm

        Obviously you are not reading the DNA groupings and statistics with a professional eye. There is absolutely no justification to use this kind of mappings in preference to the historical and linguistic record. Which indicates two probable directions: one, the ancient Khazar kingdom, and two, Western Europe / Rhineland. Statistical DNA groupings are not easy to read and allow no conclusions like yours, as yet (ask Cavalli-Sforza and group…)

  20. Sycamores
    Sycamores
    February 14, 2014, 8:53 am

    side issue

    on the Fifa website under football governance

    FIFA Task Force Israel-Palestine confirms progress http://www.fifa.com/aboutfifa/organisation/news/newsid=2274406/index.html

    Under the chairmanship of FIFA President Blatter and in the presence of FIFA Secretary General Jérôme Valcke, the President of the Israel Football Association (IFA), Avi Luzon, and the President of the Palestinian Football Association (PFA), Jibril Al Rajoub, as well as representatives from the AFC and UEFA, met at the Home of FIFA in Zurich on Monday for an evaluation session of the Task Force Israel-Palestine.

    During the meeting, the parties analysed the implementation of the parameters agreed at the meeting on 23 September 2013 for the facilitation of the movement of players, coaches, referees, officials and equipment into, out of and within Palestine.
    Both associations provided progress reports and agreed on the fact that the new mechanism had improved communication between them while accelerating the decision-making process concerning the movement of football representatives.

    so Fifa facilitates israel apartheid, no surprises there.

  21. TheWatcherWatching
    TheWatcherWatching
    February 16, 2014, 6:04 pm

    I would never consider Israel to be part of Europe

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