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‘NYT’ publishes unvarnished ADL propaganda: 93% of Palestinians are anti-Semites

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Foxman and the vice president at ADL centennial gala last week

Abe Foxman and the vice president at ADL’s gala earlier this year

A lot of folks are talking about the big new anti-Semitism survey by the Anti-Defamation League that says that more than one in four people worldwide harbor anti-Semitic attitudes.

The New York Times ran a straight story about the survey without questioning its methods, as several others now have. The Times includes these tendentious claims in the third paragraph:

The highest concentration of anti-Semitic attitudes was found in the Middle East and North Africa, the survey showed, led by the West Bank and Gaza, where 93 percent of respondents held such views, followed by Iraq at 92 percent, Yemen at 88 percent and Algeria at 87 percent. The areas where anti-Semitic attitudes were least prevalent were Oceania, the Americas and Asia. In Laos, less than 1 percent of the population held such views, the lowest anywhere, the survey said.

Oh those virtuous Laotians.

And if 74 percent of the people in North Africa and Middle Eastern countries harbor anti-Semitic attitudes, can that have anything to do with the west’s implanting a Jewish state in their midst, and that state’s reliance on Jewish symbols? The survey also says that 49 percent of Muslims have anti-Semitic beliefs. Again, aren’t Israelis part of that dyad? No; to say so would be to endorse one of 11 anti-Semitic stereotypes, per the ADL:

“People hate Jews because of the way Jews behave”

Many have faulted the design of the poll. New York Magazine said the study lacks nuance about discriminatory belief, Marsha Cohen asks why Israelis weren’t polled, the Guardian says the survey has “a political agenda” as a “propaganda tool.”

According to the ADL, a person counts as harboring anti-Semitic belief if he/she agrees with 6 of 11 negative stereotypes about Jews. These 11 include stereotypes of Jews having too much financial or global power, the aforementioned claim that “People hate Jews because of the way Jews behave,” and, the most popular negative stereotype, with 41 percent saying they believe it:

“Jews are more loyal to Israel than to this country/the countries they live in.”

The ADL is serving its pro-Israel interest here. The Israel lobby theory, for instance, is a theory of outsize conservative Jewish influence. And, as the Guardian notes (below), many Israel lobbyists insist on loyalty to Israel: for instance Sheldon Adelson saying he wishes he had served in the Israeli army not the American one or the late Myra Kraft saying her sons could fight for Israel not the U.S. The list of serious folks who have identified dual loyalty as a legitimate issue includes John Judis, Eric Alterman, Michael Scheuer, MJ Rosenberg, and Melissa Weintraub

Other negative stereotypes are that Jews have too much control over the U.S. government and too much control over the global media. These suggest that we are not allowed to talk about the remarkable rise of Jews into the Establishment, something everyone from Tony Judt to Jane Eisner to Jeffrey Goldberg has commented on. Or what about Tom Friedman saying that George W. Bush deferred to Israel because he absorbed the lesson from his father’s 1992 defeat that AIPAC rules and you must not take on Israel? We can’t talk about that.

Donna Nevel and Marilyn Kleinberg Neimark make related points in an excellent piece on the survey in the Guardian:

The most striking example of a leading question undergirds the ADL’s claim that the highest percentage of anti-Semitism is among Palestinians who live in the occupied territories. The ADL asked a group of people for whom the movement of goods, money and labor is controlled by Israel, “Do Jews have too much power in the business world?”. Were they really to be expected to answer anything but “yes”?

The survey also labels as anti-Semitic any belief, including by Palestinians in the occupied territories, that Jews talk too much about what happened to them in the Holocaust – despite other responses that indicate that too many people in the world don’t know about the Holocaust at all. But Palestinians commonly hear the Holocaust used to justify the expulsion of 750,000 Palestinians from their homes in 1948, and as justification for the continued occupation under which Palestinians are subjected to daily denial of their basic human rights.

In its press release, the ADL states that “The most widely accepted anti-Semitic stereotype worldwide is: Jews are more loyal to Israel than to this country/the countries they live in.” It’s an odd indicator of anti-Semitism given that Israeli leaders consistently claim to speak for the global Jewish community and consider loyalty to Israel a precondition for being a good Jew. So it’s actually not surprising that this constant assertion has penetrated the consciousness of the rest of the world.

These questions, and many others in the ADL survey are designed to gin up paranoia.

P.S. Note that Joseph Massad and Sherry Gorelick have independently argued that insistence on wall-to-wall Jewish support for Israel is a form of anti-Semitism.

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60 Responses

  1. tokyobk
    tokyobk
    May 15, 2014, 1:33 pm

    “And if 74 percent of the people in North Africa and Middle Eastern countries harbor anti-Semitic attitudes, can that have anything to do with the west’s implanting a Jewish state in their midst, and that state’s reliance on Jewish symbols?”

    This is actually a question as or more relevant to people who argue for One State on universal grounds, than to the ADL and other pro-Israel groups. To what extent have Jews been treated as natural and normal parts of North African and the Middle East and to what extent were and would Jews be treated as such in a post Israel scenario?

    Its true that the ADL for its own purposes does not want to separate Jews and Israel, effectively treating negative beliefs about both to the same source, but it would indeed be far more interesting and perhaps useful to construct a survey which explicitly did this.

    An anti-semite is someone for whom there needs to be a Jew at the root of every problem. What percent of the world holds that? Not 25% and not 0% either.

    • tree
      tree
      May 15, 2014, 2:35 pm

      This is actually a question as or more relevant to people who argue for One State on universal grounds, than to the ADL and other pro-Israel groups. To what extent have Jews been treated as natural and normal parts of North African and the Middle East …

      I disagree, and would reformulate your question to be, “To what extent have Jews (as the ethnic/religious rulers of Israel) ACTED as a natural and normal part of North Africa and the Middle East?” I would argue that for the most part Israel not only has NOT acted like a “natural and normal part” of MENA (as the ADL survey refers to the region) but it continues to deny it is even a part of the region, claiming instead to be an outpost of Europe and a “villa in the jungle”. Its the epitome of chutzpah for a country that claims to represent ALL JEWS and not all its citizens and that harbors deep institutional oppression of and racism towards Arab non-Jews who comprise the vast majority of the region to assert that the problem is one of Arab non-Jews non-acceptance of them.

      Israel/Palestine already is one state, controlled by Israel (“the Jewish State”) with a very repressive hand towards non-Jewish Arabs ( and even some prejudice against Arab Jews). That is the problem that needs addressing first and to claim otherwise is to engage in Jewish exceptionalism, i.e., Israeli Jews don’t need to confront their own racism until every non-Jew in the region accepts them and their sense of ethnic/religious entitlement.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        May 15, 2014, 2:51 pm

        Not sure we actually disagree. “Were and would” means before Israel and in a One State scenario.

        “Yahud” is now used to mean Israeli and so its hard to sort out the differences, which leads to the 93% figure. What would that figure be in a scenario of full equality? That is a number that should be on the minds of any one advancing One State on universlaist grounds.

      • tree
        tree
        May 15, 2014, 6:10 pm

        What would that figure be in a scenario of full equality? That is a number that should be on the minds of any one advancing One State on universlaist grounds.

        Should that number (in reference to black attitudes towards whites) have uppermost in the minds of people advancing the end of apartheid? Was it more important to worry about the possibility of future racism on the part of black South Africans than it was to ensure full civil rights for all people in South Africa? Because that is the equivalent of what you are doing with respect to the push for equality and justice in Israel/Palestine, which, I repeat, is already One State as far as governance and control goes.

        Yes, we certainly do disagree. I think that my question is much more important to confront than yours, and I would not even find your question worthy of addressing until Israel makes some significant effort to address its own severe institutional racism. Until then, your question is simply a diversion and an excuse to continue repression and dispossession.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        May 15, 2014, 7:32 pm

        First of all yes, absolutely – regarding coexistence- the question of whether one wants to replace racism with reverse racism is exactly that taken up by Mandela and King and others who struggled against white over black racism.

        Secondly, its perfectly fine if you think the conversation about anti-semitism should be tabled, but the topic here is exactly that, and I am suggesting imo a better way to measure it. So, perhaps your question is better on a scale of important things but mine is more relevant to the actual thread here.

        If you asked me to list the most important things about peace in Israel/Palestine I would not put this at the top either though as I said in the above paragraph it was a central reason the world came to see the aforementioned anti-racism struggled in universalist terms. The global anti-Apatheid movement vetted the Mandelas and ANC which changed its rhetoric and tactics over the years appropriately. That was not only not a diversion but in fact helped the final push to end Apartheid.

      • tree
        tree
        May 16, 2014, 5:04 pm

        First of all yes, absolutely – regarding coexistence- the question of whether one wants to replace racism with reverse racism is exactly that taken up by Mandela and King and others who struggled against white over black racism.

        What was “taken up” by King and Mandela was the need and desire for full equality in treatment for all. This is the same thing that is propose by the anti-Zionist One-Staters you refer to. (Not to be confused with the Zionist One-Staters who have full Jewish supremacy in mind.) Those two men did not argue that there was a need to categorize, enumerate and reform overall black attitudes towards whites PRIOR to the institution of full equality, just as they did not argue that white racism had to be enumerated and reformed prior to full equality. In fact one of the best ways to reform racist attitudes is for governments and institutions to engage in full equality.

        To imply, as you do, that the inequality that underpins and reinforces this bigotry needs to remain until any possibility that the oppressed harbor animosity towards those who oppress them diminishes or vanishes altogether is simply an excuse for inaction and for a reprehensible status quo that you seem to worry about much more in regards to its possible future reverse, not its very present reality. Israeli Jews have had 66 years to figure out how to treat non-Jews as equal to Jews and have failed miserably at it. Why is it more important to deal with the future possibility that non-Jewish Palestinians will also fail, and thus prove to be just as bad as Israeli Jews, rather than dealing with the facts as they are? Unless you think that Palestinian suffering is more acceptable than possible future equivalent Israeli Jewish suffering, in which case you need to check your own bigotry before you worry about anyone else’s. BTW, from what I have learned of Palestinian, and Middle East history, the present Jewish rule has been harsher and more unjust than any Palestinian rule within the last several hundred years. If the native Palestinians had been one-tenth as anti-semitic as the Zionists claim they were in the late eighteen hundreds and early to mid nineteen hundreds, Zionism would have never survived the era. The lack of “co-existence” can be laid primarily at the feet of the early Zionists who had no interest in co-existence, but rather insisted on dominance from the very start.

        If one can legitimately call occupied Palestinians anti-semitic (and I strongly suggest that the numbers are vastly exaggerated and manipulated) then Zionist and Israeli Jews are largely responsible for earning that anti-semitic feeling. When I was a teenager in the early seventies, I had a close girlfriend who was black and had moved away from the South, where her brother had been murdered and the authorities did nothing. She confessed to me that she hated all Southern whites, because every white Southerner she knew was a racist. I couldn’t fault her feelings; I might have felt the same in her circumstances. Equality needs to come first to eliminate those hatreds. You can’t eliminate them (from either the oppressor group or the oppressed) as long as inequality exists, and to demand that they do is to support a repressive staus quo.

    • Boomer
      Boomer
      May 15, 2014, 3:28 pm

      Obviously, this thread could go in many directions, but your question, “to what extent have Jews been treated as natural and normal parts of North African . . . ” reminded me of an interview with Marco Werman, in which he observed that:

      “The French government gave citizenship to all Jews in its colonies — which in the North African colonies created great resentment among Arabs, who weren’t granted the same status. Some of that has carried over to the present. It’s weird, because to an outsider the Jewish and Arab Algerians are hard to tell apart. The Jewish music, to an untrained ear, sounds like Arabic music, the foods are the same. Yet they’re bitterly divided.”

      from: http://www.pbs.org/frontlineworld/stories/france/werman.html

      Resentment under such circumstances would be understandable. How much more reason for resentment in Palestine after 1948!

  2. amigo
    amigo
    May 15, 2014, 1:47 pm

    “The most striking example of a leading question undergirds the ADL’s claim that the highest percentage of anti-Semitism is among Palestinians who live in the occupied territories.”

    If we Irish had occupied Palestine I am sure Palestinians would hate us.

    I wonder if the ADL would come to our aid if we were the subjects of defamation.
    We all know that ADL is incorrectly named.It should be ADJL –(anti defaming of Jews League).
    When has Abe Foxman ever stepped outside the Jewish Box to defend against defamation of non Jews.

    • tokyobk
      tokyobk
      May 15, 2014, 2:13 pm

      Just look at their website.
      They do speak out bias against other groups.
      It does not change their pro-Israel agenda which is explicit, and a cynic might say the other work is to strengthen that project, but your basic assertion is incorrect.

      • tree
        tree
        May 15, 2014, 2:44 pm

        They do speak out bias against other groups.

        To a very small extent, and for the most part the ADL refuses to speak out against bias against Palestinians committed by Israel, except in very rare occasions. It does not in any way operate on a level playing field, and in fact has been engaged in defaming Palestinians and those who support them for decades.

      • amigo
        amigo
        May 15, 2014, 2:55 pm

        tokybk, they certainly talk the talk but I found no hard evidence of them walking the walk.

        Where are they when settler thugs are writing racist slogans on Moslem and Christian holy places.

        Abe Foxman is a fake and is only in it for the money and pushing the zionist agenda and defending Jews.Nothing wrong with that except their fake claims of defending others smacks of hypocrisy.

      • tokyobk
        tokyobk
        May 15, 2014, 8:26 pm

        The ADL is a pro Israel group that conflates Israel and Jews in a way that I disagree with strongly (agreeing with Massad and others that doing so may be in itself anti-semitic).

        You may also be right that it is a cynical talk and not walk.

        But, they did condemn the racist slogans in Israel.

        “Abraham H. Foxman, ADL National Director, issued the following statement:
        “We deplore the recent spate of price tag attacks in Israel, a number of which have targeted Muslim and Christian religious sites. These heinous actions are antithetical to Jewish values and those responsible – both for inciting and committing the attacks – must be identified and stopped.”

        http://www.sdjewishworld.com/2014/05/01/jewish-groups-denounce-price-tag-attacks-extremists/

      • pabelmont
        pabelmont
        May 16, 2014, 7:21 pm

        Nothing wrong with pushing the Zionist Agenda (ZA)? Hmmm. But since the ZA states something about “Jewish and democratic”, and since that seems — in the current state of play — to be impossible, and even unwanted by some orthodox (and many anti-Palestinian) Jews, pushing the ZA is i8mpossible for any decent person to do with a straight face.

        Conservatives and Reactionaries, who believe in creating or recovering power for the chosen class — or the formerly powerful class — do not regard lying and failing to make sense as undesirable. “Win at all costs” is the ticket, (Liberals often let their side down by being unwilling to lie, cheat, and steal.)

      • pjdude
        pjdude
        May 15, 2014, 6:11 pm

        Bull**** the adl propagates defamation against Islam and Muslims and critics of israel. Much if what it does is defaming people

    • lyn117
      lyn117
      May 16, 2014, 12:30 am

      ADL is commonly known as the “Arab Defamation League”

  3. charlesfrith
    charlesfrith
    May 15, 2014, 2:08 pm

    Nothing is more anti Semitic than Zionism

  4. Kay24
    Kay24
    May 15, 2014, 2:45 pm

    What a bunch of baloney. Before the hypocritical ADL conducts polls around the world, they should look within the apartheid state, to see just how much racism exists there. Perhaps when they make things right within the country, and make peace with their neighbors, anti Israel (not anti semitism) feelings around the world will diminish. As I mentioned before zionists have peculiar definitions of anti-semitism, and calls for boycotts and sanctions, according to their silly logic, are anti-semitism too.
    We should take that ADL poll with a pinch of kosher salt.

    Survey: Most Israeli Jews Would Support Apartheid Regime in Israel

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article32833.htm

  5. The JillyBeans
    The JillyBeans
    May 15, 2014, 2:59 pm

    I almost lost my ice tea upon reading the list of the most anti-semitic countries. These countries have a legitimate reason to dislike Israel/Jewish people, but that is in the context of political disagreement with Israel. The ADL is simply inflating and conflating the issue and losing it’s argument about what antisemitism is.

  6. W.Jones
    W.Jones
    May 15, 2014, 3:00 pm

    The number 1 problem with the survey is that it asks a stereotypical question format:
    “Are Jews X?”
    If you answer Yes OR No, you have made a generalization about all Jews.

    To pick a neutral question, it is like asking “Do Americans like rap music?”
    This cannot be a Yes or No question. The only way to answer it is by saying things like “It is more popular among young Americans”, etc.

    A question like “Did Americans invade Iraq” forces the audience to either generalize/stereotype positively or negatively about Americans.

    All this poll tells you is that if nations, like Palestinians, are forced to generalize/Stereotype Jews, for which questions they will pick a negative stereotype over a positive one.

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      May 15, 2014, 8:14 pm

      The ADL poll set out what it thought were stereotypes, mostly about Jewish power and sense of being “special,” entitled beyond all others. It then asked the polled audience to register if they thought those stereotypes were probably true or not.

      The ADL was thus asking, unconsciously, if Gentiles engage in “Jewish Geography”the same way Jews do.

      This whole thing is an embarrassment of riches, both for Zionists, and actual anti-Semites. Exactly what Israel wants, what Zionism thrives on.

      A responsible press would delve into the methodology of this poll. Don’t hold your breath.

      • piotr
        piotr
        May 16, 2014, 6:29 pm

        I guess the poll about anti-American attitudes would have a question “Do Americans like rap music too much? Or “Are too many American obese?”

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        May 16, 2014, 8:51 pm

        Piotr,

        Only the first matches the kind of questions given. The poll does not ask “Are too many of Group X ____”, which would just measure a subset instead of generalizing about everyone, like “Are those of Group X _____” would.

        The second kind of question that you mentioned does not involve stereotyping an entire group as having a certain quality.

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      May 15, 2014, 9:26 pm

      W.Jones :

      The number 1 problem with the survey is that it asks a stereotypical question format: “Are Jews X?” If you answer Yes OR No, you have made a generalization about all Jews.

      Good point.

      • W.Jones
        W.Jones
        May 16, 2014, 1:09 pm

        Sibiriak:

        Yes, it is not really the kind of question that calls for a definitive Yes/No answer, like “Is red a color?”, but one that requires a qualitative explanation instead of a generalization, like “Are racing cars red?”

        The Bloomberg website has a critical article about this:
        http://www.bloombergview.com/articles/2014-05-15/how-to-paint-the-world-as-anti-semitic

        Citizen listed the Questions here:
        http://mondoweiss.net/2014/05/israel-blames-breakdown.html/comment-page-1#comment-666041

        Out of them, Four and Nine could to some extent be used correctly as negative generalizations inherent in every nation, community, or religious group, not just Jews. For example, based on collective values and ways of thinking, Americans, Christians, Chinese, Armenians, etc. etc. might tend to think that they are better in some way than other groups (more democratic, kind, hard-working, or resilient, etc. etc.) It doesn’t mean they are right, but that collective thinking can work that way.

  7. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    May 15, 2014, 3:03 pm

    Why would anyone in their right mind expect anything else out of the New York Bloody Times? For decades they have produced and printed anti semitic propaganda against Palestinians having to do with the conflict. Even more recently journalist here at Mondoweiss have documented how NYT spins the conflict, the peace talks, who is to blame etc. NYBT sold the Iraq war based on lies, repeats unsubstantiated claims about Iran….Just no surprises here…more of the same

    • Walid
      Walid
      May 15, 2014, 4:12 pm

      What better way to keep those American cheques coming than keeping the Jews and everyone else spooked with such silly surveys about Israel’s existential threat? Israelis are confused and paranoid; they keep bragging about their innovative technical skills and superior military strength while at the same time they keep harping that they are in danger of extinction because they surrounded by a world that hates Jews. The victimhood schtick.

  8. W.Jones
    W.Jones
    May 15, 2014, 3:12 pm

    The article is just reinforcing a negative stereotype about Palestinians being “anti-semitic”, which is then used to justify the Israeli State brutalizing them as a “defensive” measure even when there is no actual provocation. The article is reinforcing this stereotype based on questions that force participants to either make a positive or negative generalization/stereotype about all Jews.

    Now do you actually care why Palestinians would pick the negative stereotype, or do you just want to label them and put them in the box? Did anyone care why could it be that Palestinians would be supposedly the most “anti-semitic”?

  9. German Lefty
    German Lefty
    May 15, 2014, 3:33 pm

    This anti-Semitism survey is such a joke.

    “People hate Jews because of the way Jews behave”
    This made me laugh. What’s wrong with hating people because of the way they behave? If someone behaves in a very terrible way, then I hate that person, no matter if this person happens to be a Jew or not. Apparently, the ADL wants us to love a Jew even if he treats us badly.

    “Jews are more loyal to Israel than to this country/the countries they live in.”
    All the statements in the survey are very vague. How are respondents supposed to interpret the word “Jews”? Does “Jews” mean “ALL Jews”, “MOST Jews”, “MANY Jews”, or “SOME Jews”? Respondents who read “Jews” as “ALL Jews” probably agree with none of the statements. However, I am one of those people who read “Jews” as “MOST Jews”. Therefore, I would agree with many of the statements. My answer would be that these statements are true for most Jews because most Jews are Zionists.

    Here are the results for Germany: http://global100.adl.org/#country/germany

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      May 15, 2014, 8:21 pm

      @ GL

      I also would agree with many of the statements, so I guess I am officially branded by the ADL as an anti-semite. Remember, the questions were asked in terms of probability as to each statement. Jewish accounting IMO should not be limited to Jews. Look at the positive contributions, but also the negative contributions,

    • Elisabeth
      Elisabeth
      May 16, 2014, 8:04 am

      What I find weird is this: Our neigbors Belgium and Germany have 27% ‘anti-semites’, and the Netherlands 5%. Do people radically change views at a country’s borders? Even the dialects are the same on both sides of the border and only gradually change into different languages.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        May 16, 2014, 4:09 pm

        What I find weird is this: Our neigbors Belgium and Germany have 27% ‘anti-semites’, and the Netherlands 5%. Do people radically change views at a country’s borders?

        I noticed that, too. However, I don’t think that the views are actually different.
        Perhaps the different results are caused by a different interpretation of the statements. I assume that Dutch people interpreted “Jews” as “all Jews” and Germans thought that “Jews” means “most Jews” or “many Jews”.
        Another explanation could be that the media reporting is different in the Netherlands. That’s just a guess. Perhaps Dutch MSM report on the existence of anti-Zionist Jews much more often than German MSM and this improves the overall reputation of Jews.

  10. Boomer
    Boomer
    May 15, 2014, 3:38 pm

    RE: “Again, aren’t Israelis part of that dyad? No; to say so would be to endorse one of 11 anti-Semitic stereotypes, per the ADL”

    There are so many aspects of reality that can’t be acknowledged without being called anti-semitic. Being out of touch with reality is one definition of insanity. Being aware of an immoral reality but continuing to enable it makes one guilty of perpetuating it. Being called anti-semitic then becomes a badge of honor.

  11. Krauss
    Krauss
    May 15, 2014, 3:44 pm

    One of the key ADL definitions of “anti-Semitism”: oppose Jewish apartheid and you’re an anti-Semite.

    The second part which is really weird is the notion that Jews can act as we want to other people and if they hate us for it, they must be irrational and “bigoted”. It is in of itself a bigoted view, because it means a Jew can never do wrong.

    It’s a very self-serving argument, and beyond that, it is not only ADL which is pushing it. It is a common, almost axiomatic, belief among the Jewish writers I’ve read on the topic of anti-Semitism.

    And it is a very toxic belief, because it leads to conclusions that 90+ % of Palestinians must be anti-Semitic because they oppose Jewish domination, and since any opposition to Jewish actions is in itself “anti-Semitism”, it in effect gives the moral pass to any Jewish extremist and settler.

  12. German Lefty
    German Lefty
    May 15, 2014, 3:54 pm

    By the way, the linked Guardian article points to a different survey:
    EU Views of Roma, Muslims, Jews
    http://www.pewglobal.org/2014/05/12/chapter-4-views-of-roma-muslims-jews/

  13. Bumblebye
    Bumblebye
    May 15, 2014, 4:45 pm

    Dave Rich, writing in
    http://www.leftfootforward.org/2014/05/britain-is-not-an-antisemitic-country-but-we-shouldnt-be-complacent/
    doesn’t question the (dodgy) methodology, but has this to say about the high levels found in MENA

    “Sure, we can rationalise this as a response to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: but conflict-driven prejudice is still prejudice.”

    He doesn’t question the “Community Security Trust” either, which bigs up anti-semitism from anything adverse remotely connected to anything Jewish. But he works for them. ADL lite.

    • Woody Tanaka
      Woody Tanaka
      May 15, 2014, 5:50 pm

      “‘Sure, we can rationalise this as a response to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict: but conflict-driven prejudice is still prejudice.'”

      Nonsense. These are separate phenomenon, as conflict-driven prejudice mostly fades after the conflict is over. (Note, e.g., the varying views of the Japanese and Germans among American in 1925, 1945 and 1965.) In fact, I would say that “conflict-driven prejudice” is a misnomer, and it’s actually simply “conflict-driven hate” and that hate can be expressed in racist and prejudicial ways.

  14. lysias
    lysias
    May 15, 2014, 4:48 pm

    I wonder if Jill Abramson’s departure will lead to any changes in NYT reporting.

  15. Palikari
    Palikari
    May 15, 2014, 4:49 pm

    That most Palestinians are anti-Semitic is a fact (sadly), not “propaganda”.

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      May 15, 2014, 8:28 pm

      @ Palikari
      Most Jews in Germany in the 1940’s and in the German OT were “anti-German/Aryan.”

      Is that also a sad fact?

      What’s the difference?

    • talknic
      talknic
      May 15, 2014, 8:37 pm

      Palikari “That most Palestinians are anti-Semitic is a fact (sadly), not “propaganda””

      ‘fact’ … evidence?

    • eljay
      eljay
      May 15, 2014, 10:14 pm

      >> That most Palestinians are anti-Semitic is a fact (sadly) …

      Being oppressed by supremacist Semitics for over 60 years makes one anti-. Fancy that.

    • Ecru
      Ecru
      May 15, 2014, 11:28 pm

      @ Palikari

      That most Palestinians are anti-Semitic is a fact

      I would imagine in much the same way most inmates of Treblinka were anti-German…..

    • seafoid
      seafoid
      May 16, 2014, 12:25 am

      Most Israeli Jews are racist . That’s not kosher
      Expecting Jews to behave decently is not anti-Semitic,.

      http://www.haaretz.com/opinion/.premium-1.588916
      .” But the draconian combination of imperialistic religiosity with extremist nationalism means Israel is liable to slide into severe racism, to which some rabbis will always offer their stamp of approval.
      It’s no wonder I feel this regression in my attitude toward the major national symbols. The interpretation being given to them deeply upsets me and is not something I can just accept”

      And Palestinians don’t accept it either.

  16. German Lefty
    German Lefty
    May 15, 2014, 5:12 pm

    One commenter on the Guardian website wrote this:

    Quite a bit of [the survey] actually IS about Israel – but for some reason the ADL has chosen not to publish its findings on this score.
    Interviewees were first asked whether they were “favorable/unfavorable” towards Israel and “favorable/unfavorable” towards Palestine, and then:
    Q18: Do actions taken by the state of Israel influence your opinions about Jews or do they not influence your opinions about Jews?
    – Major influence?
    – Minor influence?
    – Do not influence?
    Q19: Would you say that the actions Israel takes generally give you a better opinion of Jews or a worse opinion of Jews?
    – Better?
    – Worse?

    After I read this, I had a look at a 2012 ADL survey that included the responses to these questions.
    http://www.adl.org/assets/pdf/israel-international/adl_anti-semitism_presentation_february_2012.pdf
    Page 13: Is your opinion of Jews influenced by actions taken by the State of Israel?
    Page 14: Respondents who answered “yes” in the previous question were then asked the following question: Is your opinion of Jews better or worse?
    Page 15: In your opinion, is the violence directed against Jews in (insert individual country name) a result of anti-Jewish feelings or a result of anti-Israel sentiment?
    Page 16: Do you think your government is doing enough to ensure the safety and security of its Jewish citizens?
    These are the interesting questions.

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      May 15, 2014, 8:33 pm

      What if they asked the question, do you think your government is doing enough to ensure the safety and security of its non-jewish citizens while it pursues the same for its (small) percentage of jewish citizens?

  17. Xpat
    Xpat
    May 15, 2014, 5:24 pm

    1) For years, the ADL has worked hard to convince us that anti-Semitism in America was still a potent threat. Is the ADL’s large investment in the Global 100 survey an implicit admission that that is no longer the case?

    2) I’d be interested to see a comparative survey of the same people answering questions about ethnic (and other forms of bias) alongside anti-Semitism. This might illuminate anti-Semitic beliefs as a marker of other forms of bias. For instance, if the same percentage of ethnic Spaniards hate Jews as much as they hate Basques, we could apply the ADL’s research on anti-Semitism toward understanding that conflict.

    3) Regarding the methodology, I find it odd that you need to rack up at least 6 positives to be an anti-Semite. If the markers are so egregious, wouldn’t one be enough. Using the N word isn’t just a contributing factor, it is in itself a gross violation. So the ADL’s premise feels like witch-hunting, working from the assumption that there are hidden anti-Semites lurking everywhere (with the exception of 99% of Laos).

    4) Expecting people on the other side of the world to know about the Holocaust when we don’t care to know anything about their tragedies and genocides is an example of Marker #10: we talk too much about the Holocaust. There, I admitted it. I’m at least one sixth anti-semitic.

  18. Stephen Shenfield
    Stephen Shenfield
    May 15, 2014, 5:30 pm

    If the survey had any pretension to methodological rigor, it would start by asking respondents whether they have heard of a group known as Jews, what sort of group they think this is, what knowledge if any they have of this group, etc. Then respondents’ perceptions of Jews would be explored in as open-ended a way as possible, encouraging them to distinguish among “all Jews,” “most Jews” and “some Jews” (probably the ADL survey does not even allow them to draw such distinctions). This would yield data not only on anti-Semitism but also on related phenomena such as philo-Semitism. In Laos and quite a few other countries most people if not all are completely indifferent toward Jews, as Jews form no part of their life experience and are irrelevant to issues they care about.

    The main value of this “survey” is the insight it gives into what views the organizers regard as politically correct and incorrect (if we didn’t already know).

  19. Donald
    Donald
    May 15, 2014, 6:23 pm

    Phil is right to write about this with disgust, but at the same time I can’t get too excited, because anyone who isn’t a complete moron would look at the figures for the Palestinians and immediately realize that this study is stupid. The fact that Palestinians rate the highest for anti-semitism strongly suggests that the study design didn’t make distinctions between bigotry and the natural resentment oppressed people have for their oppressors. I assume some South African blacks had a pretty low opinion of the Boers.

    Someone should do a study on how much anti-Arab or anti-Palestinian bigotry there is among Zionists, both Christian and Jewish. Done correctly I think the number would be pretty damn high.

    • Kay24
      Kay24
      May 15, 2014, 6:50 pm

      You are spot on. The hatred from the Palestinians towards Israel, basically stems from being occupied, having suffered under their blockades, deprived of basic needs for years, being collectively punished, being killed near their apartheid walls, and fences, have their children dragged away at night, dumped in jails, and abused, and every human rights violation one can think of. Who would feel love for the oppressor? I know for a fact that if Americans walked in their shoes, they would be throwing more than stones at their tormenter.

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        May 15, 2014, 8:39 pm

        @ Kay24
        Yes, it’s a really stupid poll. Nothing but propaganda for Israel’s agenda.

  20. Abuadam
    Abuadam
    May 15, 2014, 7:09 pm

    Population of Laos is 6.65 million. So less than 1 percent would be say 60,000.
    Pray tell what did the Jews do to these 60,000 !

    As for me I am denied the right to reside in the land of my birth, because some ancestor decided he or she should believe in a different book of myths than their parents!!

  21. pjdude
    pjdude
    May 15, 2014, 7:59 pm

    Also problematic

    Do people hate jews because of the way jews behave?

    It’s basically saying that if you judge jews based on their actions and still dislike them cause your still anti Semitic in other words if jews are treated like everyone else and you find fault in them your still an anti Semite. The adl clearly views jews as higher than Gentiles and believes Gentiles have no right to even think of jews as anything other than perfect innocents.

  22. NickJOCW
    NickJOCW
    May 15, 2014, 10:05 pm

    If such a large percent are defined as anti-Semitic by an outfit that ‘sounds’ bona fide, doesn’t that open the door to the ill informed to feel, Well, that’s OK then? I mean if so many take a particular position in a contentious issue some may feel disinclined to be appear in the minority. I read somewhere that when one citizen in a thousand defies a law it becomes unenforceable for logistical reasons.

  23. Bandolero
    Bandolero
    May 15, 2014, 11:08 pm

    I think this ADL piece is a good opportunity to remind all people who didn’t so far to watch Yoav Shamir’s great movie “Defamation.” That movie explains this new ADL propagandapiece better than anything I know.

    Meanwhile Janet Yellen runs the international financial markets into the next big bubble, Muslim-haters in Germany regularly burn mosques without anybody caring for this, Shia-haters in Iraq & Pakistan bomb dozens of Shia people daily into pieces without anybody even finding it newsworthy, and of course, arab-haters in Israel kill arab people on a daily base while enjoying the full solidarity of the ADL and much of so-called civilized western world.

  24. Ecru
    Ecru
    May 15, 2014, 11:49 pm

    As I recall wasn’t it the ADL who published a survey about Europe and claimed the finding demonstrated a growth in “anti-semitism” (whatever the term meant that week)? A much trumpeted growth that when looked at was within the surveys own margin of error?

    Can we just rename it the “Goy Defamation League” as defaming non-Jews is all it seems interested in doing.

  25. Citizen
    Citizen
    May 16, 2014, 7:26 am

    It’s not only that the ADL is peddling crap poles conflating anti-semitism with criticism of Israel’s policies and conduct and US enablement of same–check out here where the Israel Project’s latest poll claims Americans blame Palestinians for breakdown in talks: http://www.thetower.org/0322-poll-americans-overwhelmingly-blame-palestinians-for-breakdown-in-talks/?

  26. jon s
    jon s
    May 16, 2014, 10:20 am

    This may interest your intrepid reporters:

    At BGU, here in Be’er Sheva, this coming Tuesday
    at 4:00 p.m.
    Lecture under the auspices of the Robert St. John Chair in Objective Middle East Reporting
    In the Eye of the Storm: Reflections on Being Jerusalem Bureau Chief for The New York Times
    by Ethan Bronner, Deputy National Editor of The New York Times
    Moderator: Prof. David Newman OBE, Dean, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences
    W.A. Minkoff Senate Hall

    http://in.bgu.ac.il/en/Board/Pages/44th-program.aspx

  27. Woody Tanaka
    Woody Tanaka
    May 16, 2014, 2:16 pm

    “Robert St. John Chair in Objective Middle East Reporting
    In the Eye of the Storm: Reflections on Being Jerusalem Bureau Chief for The New York Times
    by Ethan Bronner,”

    LMAO. A chair in “Objective Middle East Reporting” in an organ of the Zionist State. How Orwellian! You people aren’t even trying. And featuring Bronner??? Bronner’s son was an I”D”F terrorist in uniform and you pretend he could be “objective”… That’s some Chutzpah, that’s for sure. LOL.

  28. wondering jew
    wondering jew
    May 17, 2014, 3:29 am

    I think hatred of Yehudim is a relevant issue today, but the issues of Jew and Zionism are so mixed together that it becomes impossible to discuss one without the other. A phenomenon that erupted in such a violent fashion did not die overnight and to pretend that it did is to say that human beings are somehow different than physical phenomenon, that some kind of revolution of thought occurred, when there is no evidence of that. But the ADL’s questions are not designed to try to separate the issues but to blend them as much as possible.

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