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Zionism ate my religion, and I am taking it back

Activism
on 34 Comments

I remember being asked in grade school, “If Canada went to war with Israel, who would you fight for?”  The question made no sense to me. Canada didn’t go to war with Christianity, so why would it go to war with Judaism?

Theology being too difficult, Israel was my religion.  The 1967 war gave it a miraculous sheen.  When the First Intifadah threw my religion against my principles, I had no way to resolve the contradiction.  I was an absentee Jew for a quarter century.  While living four years behind the walls of Gaza, I began to study my religion through its principles, as I encountered Israel through its exercise of power.  Then Israel decisively left me during the assault of 2014.

I left Gaza a year later, wondering how to be a Jew without Zionism.  I left my work with communities affected by conflict, and returned to New Zealand.  While I settled into Wellington, the family and social consequences of having chosen to live in Gaza unfolded painfully.  I joined a liberal, Progressive temple, and stumbled into one more strenuously contested ground of this conflict:  how to unshroud Jewishness from the Jewish nationalism of our institutions.

Marilyn Garson

Through nine years in Afghanistan and Gaza, I had enjoyed the unselfconscious nearness of my colleagues’ religion.  At last, I inhaled my own.  I left each service feeling elevated.  I joined the choir, learned to read and chant the Torah, had my Bat Mitzvah and sometimes led the singing for Shabbat services.  I simply didn’t recite the prayers for Israel’s government (or, in other temples, for its army).  I didn’t celebrate the Israeli holidays or attend the Zionist events, although they formed a good part of the social calendar.  As I read commentaries on my first journey through the Torah, I set aside the ones more political than spiritual.  For example, Rabbi Lord Jonathan Sacks, Chief Rabbi of the United Hebrew Congregations of the Commonwealth 1991 – 2013, links the Korah Rebellion against the authority of Moses to a rather misleading portrait of BDS.  He is welcome to his political positions – but although he concludes that “the spirit of Korah lives on,” it’s not Moses  (or any other religious entity) who is being challenged today.

I put those things aside.  I understand that, if Israel is one’s religion, then a challenge to Israel elicits religious offense.  I thought I could sift out the religion, and be left alone by the rest of it.

Then came Trump, and then came Jerusalem.  Then the Israeli Ambassador informed a temple gathering that Israel has no obligation to the ‘inconvenient’ refugees, who ‘no one wants’.  I looked in anguish at the silent people around me.  They are principled, caring, often activist; and many of us are descended from inconvenient refugees.  The people in that room support all kinds of charities, including the interfaith campaign to increase New Zealand’s intake of refugees. I assume that some of them would have objected, and felt that the temple was not the right venue for it.

I am not here taking issue with their beliefs (with which I disagree, but which I do not own).  I am taking issue with the Jewish institutions that give such silence religious cover.  Institutions are, among other things, agreements about behaviour.  Institutions are political interests and they condition the politics of their members.  The socio-institutional context of prayer and ritual is a (provocative) field of liturgical analysis known as form-criticism.  When mainstream Jewish institutions wake up in bed with Donald Trump, the religious influence of Zionism is due for some serious form-critiquing.

I couldn’t tolerate the polite silence.  As Israel radicalized, they were being moved too far for me.

I had learned to study (for which I will always be grateful), and I had questions:  what is Judaism, if not Israel?  Why do we claim social justice differently from secular acts with the same aim?

I had Marc Ellis to thank for my dim sense of a prophetic liberation theology, although I had not a skerrick of understanding of ‘the prophetic’.  And I had a beginners’ Biblical Hebrew textbook.  I grew up knowing that the founders of Israel had revived a dead language while they were making the desert bloom.  Until I opened that textbook, I had not understood that they overwrote the language of our prayers and our source texts.  Biblical Hebrew had not died; they colonized it.

On the strength of that hopeful toolkit, I vowed to read the prophets in Biblical Hebrew.  I wanted sweat equity in my religion, not a set of received political positions.  I left the city for a year of remedial study.

For me, being a Jew in dissent requires, first, figuring out what it means to be a Jew.

That requires the language of our primary sources.  Language unlocks the lives of the prophets, who gave us a stern assignment, not an entitlement.  Prophetic Judaism critiques power and its theology elevates the care of the vulnerable.  Jewishness requires a study of the liturgy, the content and phenomenology of prayer.  And it has centuries of richly contested philosophy.  With that, I will have reached the starting line.

After years in the middle of other people’s wars, a friend suggested that this study calls to me because, ‘the value of religion [is to] heal, rather than destroy our humanity… for the establishment of any kind of grounded human decency.’  I had a long skype with a friend in Gaza this morning, and she, too, is yearning for some study time and some grounded human decency.  We are, after all, both women of our Books.

Judaism is spiritual.  Zionist nationalism is, emphatically, not.   It’s not hard to tell them apart, and public discourse is learning to do that.  If only more Jews could do the same.

Younger people are better at it.  Their co-activism imagines co-existence.  British youth say kaddish for the Gazans who have died, and IfNotNow is protesting Birthright.

Their parents need a positive, pro-Jewish walkout – a NotTooLate.  Lots of them; because being a non-Zionist Jew is a project without a single template.  In dissent, one spends a lot of time reacting, correcting, countering, browbeating and fending off despair.  We need also to create, to be fed and to envision the reconciliation that can be good for everyone.

Meanwhile, my Prophets Project flourishes.  Ezekiel made my hair stand on end.  I am no longer self-conscious about singing 2500 year old prayers into the sunrise, reciting irregular verbs in the shower, and pestering the scholar down the road with questions.  I feel fortified in my inheritance, nourished by its awe and argument and mystery.  I have found an asset to bring to my life, including the urgent matter of justice.

About Marilyn Garson

Marilyn Garson worked with communities affected by war, including Afghanistan and Pakistan (2005 – 2010) and the Gaza Strip (2011 – 2015). She is a co-founder of the Gaza Gateway, a social enterprise creating employment in Gaza. She writes from New Zealand, and blogs at Contrapuntal: Transforming Gaza. You can follow her on Twitter @skinonbothsides.

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34 Responses

  1. lonely rico
    July 12, 2018, 2:02 pm

    As Israel radicalized, they were being moved too far for me.

    Israel was not recently radicalized. It was always so.

    In a recent article in the Palestine Chronicle, Jeremy Salt, referring to Elor Azaria, who walked up to a comatose young Palestinian as he lay on the ground in Hebron and shot him in the head, asks –

    What kind of state and ideology can produce a citizenry which treats this murderer as a hero? We know the answer. A sick state. A state based not on morality, justice, and law but brute force. A state based on an ideology which Moshe Menuhin, the father of the great violinist Yehudi, described as the ‘decadence’ of Judaism in our time. A state which has brought nothing but violence to the Middle East … A state which is one of the greatest dangers to Jewish life in history.

    Elsewhere in his denunciation, Salt writes –

    We have watched this for seven decades. Seven decades of unremitting, remorseless, violence. A poisonous ideology gives rise to a state, poisonous at its roots, the people poisoned by the state, indoctrinated, taught to hate and taught to kill without compunction, without conscience.
    Israel is by far the worst settler-colonial experience in history, infinitely worse than Algeria at its worst and far worse than South Africa. Its violence extends from the market bombings of the 1930s to the massacres and destruction of close to 500 Palestinian villages and hamlets in the late 1940s.
    Onwards to massacres in Gaza, Lebanon and Jordan in every single decade that has followed, along with ‘targeted’ killings and individual assassinations, many of them far from Israel’s non-declared borders.

    The Moral Decadence of Zionism/Jeremy Salt

    http://www.palestinechronicle.com/the-moral-decadence-of-zionism/

    • JWalters
      July 12, 2018, 6:06 pm

      “Israel was not recently radicalized. It was always so. “

      Absolutely correct.

      And the reality is that God doesn’t give a damn if you’re Jewish or not. Garson could simplify her life for the better by giving up her obsession with being Jewish, the legacy of her childhood brainwashing. It’s a big world out there.

      Israeli-born, Jewish therapist Avigail Abarbanel has wisely written
      “It’s time for American Jews to recognize they have been duped”
      http://mondoweiss.net/2015/07/american-recognize-duped
      “Why I left the cult”
      https://mondoweiss.net/2016/10/why-i-left-the-cult

      • RoHa
        July 12, 2018, 7:01 pm

        “Garson could simplify her life for the better by giving up her obsession with being Jewish, the legacy of her childhood brainwashing.”

        Careful. Yonah has stopped talking to me because I say that sort of thing. Don’t want that to happen to you.

    • RoHa
      July 12, 2018, 6:59 pm

      Nice to see Moshe Menhuin hasn’t been forgotten.

      • Misterioso
        July 13, 2018, 10:34 am

        @RoHa

        “Nice to see Moshe Menhuin hasn’t been forgotten.”

        Indeed!!

        The late renowned Jewish scholar, Moshe Menuhin (father of the famous classical violinist Yehudi Menuhin), wrote in his The Decadence of Judaism in Our Time (1965) that he became “disenchanted with the developments of political Zionism” and left Palestine because he was convinced that such developments “implied wars of injustice and the degeneration of Judaism.” (Quoted by Sami Hadawi, Bitter Harvest, p. 77)

        He also expressed his outrage at the assassination of Count Folke Bernadotte (the Swedish United Nations Mediator for Palestine) and Andre Serot, chief UN Observer, by members of the Stern Gang on Sept. 17/48. The United Nations failed to hold Israel to account: “And thus Israel got away with murder….To this day it is almost a crime to recall the murder of Count Bernadotte because ‘it may be a disservice to poor little Israel.’ Forgotten is the name of the noble man who was a victim of ungrateful, land hungry jingoists.” (Moshe Menuhin, The Decadence of Judaism in Our Time , New York, Exposition Press, 1965, pp. 129-30)

        BTW, in keeping with Menuhin’s fears, Tel Aviv University philosophy lecturer, Adi Ophir wrote in his introduction to the issue of the Israeli journal Theory and Criticism marking Israel’s 50th anniversary: “The contributors write out of fear that control over the Palestinians in particular, and the adoption of the political forms of an ethnocentric and racist nation-state in general, are turning Israel into the most dangerous place in the world for the humanity and morality of the Jewish community, for the continuity of Jewish cultures and perhaps for Jewish existence itself.” (Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, December 1999, p. 88)

    • Paranam Kid
      July 13, 2018, 1:29 am

      @lonely rico: may thanks for sharing the link to Jeremy Salt’s article. His article, a short essay really (but hey, what’s in a name) is very well written. I also did not know this website and put its RSS feed in my RSS reader immediately. Thanks again ;-)

  2. edwardm
    July 12, 2018, 5:38 pm

    “I grew up knowing that the founders of Israel had revived a dead language while they were making the desert bloom.” Again. WHO made the desert bloom?

    http://lawrenceofcyberia.blogs.com/news/2010/03/palestinians-made-the-desert-bloom.html

  3. echinococcus
    July 12, 2018, 7:13 pm

    When mainstream Jewish institutions wake up in bed with Donald Trump, the religious influence of Zionism is due for some serious form-critiquing.

    And when private persons sound like they only just now woke up from a 100-year beauty sleep (kissed by a Trump?), all you can do is say better late than never.

  4. RobertHenryEller
    July 13, 2018, 8:53 am

    “I left Gaza a year later, wondering how to be a Jew without Zionism.”

    What is there to wonder about? From the time Jews were driven out of Palestine, whether in the 8th century BCE or the 6th century BCE, Jews in the Diaspora were Jews without Zionism for over two thousand, five hundred years. And yet we remained Jews, and Judaism did not die out. Most of Jewish culture derives from Jews’ and Judaism’s ability to survive without Zionism.

    Here’s something to really wonder about: Can Jews and Judaism survive Zionism and survive the State of Israel “speaking for Jews?”

    • Rob Roy
      July 13, 2018, 12:03 pm

      We hope not.

    • RoHa
      July 13, 2018, 8:31 pm

      But in those days Jews believed they had to be Jews because God told them to. Nowadays, lots of Jews don’t believe in God, but still believe they have to be Jews. And they have to find a reason why.

      • eljay
        July 13, 2018, 10:10 pm

        || RobertHenryEller: … Here’s something to really wonder about: Can Jews and Judaism survive Zionism and survive the State of Israel “speaking for Jews?” ||

        || Rob Roy: We hope not. ||

        I don’t know whether or not Jews and Judaism can survive Zionism, but since Jewish is a religion-based identity and a choice IMO it is – and it should be – entirely up to them. As long as people choose to embrace that identity and be/come Jews, Jews will exist. When people stop choosing to embrace that identity and be/come Jews, Jews will not exist.

        (The choice to be/come Jewish does not require or comprise a right to an oppressive, colonialist, (war) criminal and religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine.)

      • Keith
        July 14, 2018, 10:59 am

        ROHA- “But in those days Jews believed they had to be Jews because God told them to. Nowadays, lots of Jews don’t believe in God, but still believe they have to be Jews. And they have to find a reason why.”

        You are in agreement with Jacob Neusner (and me). Once, Jews were united by the Judaic religion which elaborated a common destiny. Hard times were said to be God’s retribution. The Holocaust changed that. Who could believe that was God’s will? So, the Zionists exploited the Holocaust to convince the various groups of Jews that they shared a common fate because they were Jews, hence, their best defense against irrational and eternal anti-Semitism was solidarity and support for the Jewish state.

        “Just as the Judaic tradition had formerly told Jews what it meant to be Jewish – had supplied them with a considerable definition of their identity – so does Zionism in the modern age. Jews who lost hold of the mythic structure of the past were given a grasp on a new myth, one composed of the structural remnants of the old one.” (p176, “Stranger at Home: “The Holocaust”, Zionism, and American Judaism,” Jacob Neusner)

      • Keith
        July 14, 2018, 11:07 am

        ELJAY- “… but since Jewish is a religion-based identity and a choice IMO it is – and it should be – entirely up to them.”

        You are significantly underestimating the psychological impact of the Holocaust in which it most assuredly was not up to the individual to decide if he/she was Jewish. The Zionists have exploited the Holocaust to convince many (most?) Jews that the Goyim will always consider them Jews, hence, Jews share a common fate. Additionally, nowadays there are a lot of advantages to sharing in Jewish kinship solidarity.

      • echinococcus
        July 14, 2018, 2:22 pm

        Keith

        The Holocaust changed that. Who could believe that was God’s will?

        Anyone who could believe the many God-ordered atrocities in the Old Testament.

  5. brwencino
    July 13, 2018, 11:20 am

    Marilyn, Zionism did not eat your religion; your religion ate Zionism. Israel is not a Zionist State; Israel, according to its Jewish inhabitants, the State of Israel and the organized Jewish community elsewhere, is “the Jewish State of Israel.”

    • Misterioso
      July 13, 2018, 12:19 pm

      @brwencino

      The entity known as “Israel” is neither a state nor a country, i.e., it has yet to officially declare its borders and have them agreed to as such by the international community.

  6. Misterioso
    July 13, 2018, 12:17 pm

    Re: “Israel, a light unto nations, [not.]”

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/dont-let-israel-become-the-promised-land-of-impunity-for-crooks-and-fraudsters/?utm_source=The+Times+of+Israel+Daily+Edition&utm_campaign=c464c475a9-EMAIL_CAMPAIGN_2018_07_01_12_23&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_adb46cec92-c464c475a9-55685937

    “Don’t let Israel become a promised land of impunity for crooks and fraudsters” Times of Israel, July 1/18, by Simona Weinglass and David Horovitz

    EXCERPTS:
    “Israel isn’t just a sanctuary for the world’s Jewish victims of persecution, it has also become a haven for financial fraudsters. Dealers in binary options and the like find law enforcement officers who are lenient or complicit, legislators who champion the illegal practice, and tax policies that encourage such conduct. Since Israel is a close ally of the US, it is unlikely that it will face sanctions from foreign governments, so it is up to Israel itself to clean its own house. Until it does so, it will have a welcome mat out for both homegrown and foreign fraudsters.”

    “On a recent trip abroad, The Times of Israel spoke with law enforcement sources who confirmed what we have long suspected but preferred not to believe. While law enforcement bodies overseas are devoting considerable effort and resources to tackling binary options, forex, cryptocurrency and other financial fraud emanating from Israel, Israeli police and other law enforcement bodies are not cooperating effectively with these efforts, and at times are actively stonewalling them.

    “Requests from overseas for help in bringing binary options operatives to justice, for example, are met with an exceedingly slow and partial response, and in some cases with no response at all, the Times of Israel was told. The assertion that ‘we outlawed binary options’ is frequently voiced by Israeli officials, we were told by overseas law enforcement personnel, as though the fact that Israel passed a law last October banning this particular form of fraud means there is no need to bring its many thousands of perpetrators to justice.

    “Over the last decade, Israel has become a global hub of investment scams, employing more than 10,000 citizens — many of them new immigrants and foreign-language speakers — in boiler rooms throughout the country, selling fraudulent binary options, forex, CFDs (contracts for differences) and cryptocurrency investments over the phone and internet to people abroad. Victims are lured into investments under false pretenses, and the vast majority lose their money. When the victim protests, the ‘broker’ more often than not disappears with the money. Binary options fraud alone was estimated to be earning between $5 billion and $10 billion a year before it was banned by a Knesset law that took effect on January 26 of this year. Some binary options operatives have simply ignored the ban, continuing to offer the product from Israel, while others now sell fraudulent forex or cryptocurrency investments, and still others have moved their operations abroad to countries including Russia, Ukraine, Philippines, Panama, Poland, Albania, Bulgaria, Cyprus and Serbia.”

  7. LHunter
    July 15, 2018, 1:25 pm

    Zionism killed a member of my family and I can’t get them back

  8. jon s
    July 16, 2018, 9:53 am

    This is an important and thought-provoking essay.
    It brings me back to a point I once made regarding Phil Weiss’ desire to “win the argument” in the Jewish community. I think that anti-Zionists like PW stand little chance of winning over the community as long as they seem to be indifferent to the needs and survival of the community and offer no real alternative. In other words if Jewish anti-Zionists said something like : “instead of supporting Israel , let’s devote our resources to strengthening our institutions, let’s have more Bible and Talmud study, more Hebrew or Yiddish language, more Jewish History and culture, etc. – then maybe they would have more of an impact.
    I also recall something that Peter Beinart wrote, when someone wrote that Jewish Zionists and anti-Zionists should get together to discuss Zionism and Israel and such he said that they should get together to discuss the weekly Torah portion…
    Ms. Garson’s essay seems to open up possibilities along those lines.

    • eljay
      July 16, 2018, 10:49 am

      || jon s: … I think that anti-Zionists like PW stand little chance of winning over the community as long as they seem to be indifferent to the needs and survival of the community and offer no real alternative. In other words if Jewish anti-Zionists said something like : “instead of supporting Israel , let’s devote our resources to strengthening our institutions, let’s have more Bible and Talmud study, more Hebrew or Yiddish language, more Jewish History and culture, etc. – then maybe they would have more of an impact. … ||

      According to Zionists, the majority of “the community” believes that:
      – Jews are entitled to a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine; and
      – the “Jewish State” is the “ancient / historic homeland” of all people who have chosen to be Jewish.

      But you’re suggesting that “the community” can be turned away from this unjust and immoral belief and the oppressive, colonialist and (war) criminal construct it has spawned;
      – not by embracing the ideal of justice, accountability and equality universally and consistently applied; but
      – by some Bible / Hebrew / Jewish History studies that would presumably reinforce “the community’s” belief in their “ancient / historic homeland”.

      Interesting.

      • jon s
        July 17, 2018, 2:35 am

        eljay,
        Studying Jewish texts and languges and history does not contradict ideals of justice, equality and peace. Those ideals could even be reinforced.
        And yes, Israel is the Jewish historic homeland.

      • eljay
        July 17, 2018, 8:06 am

        || jon s: eljay,
        Studying Jewish texts and languges and history does not contradict ideals of justice, equality and peace. … ||

        As it currently stands, the study of Jewish texts and languges and history seems to have convinced most of the world’s Jews that they are entitled:
        – to a religion-supremacist state in as much as possible of geographic Palestine; and
        – to do whatever evil is necessary to secure and maintain it.

        That directly contradicts the ideals of justice, accountability and equality.

        || … Those ideals could even be reinforced. … ||

        Since insufficient study has convinced most of the world’s Jews that they are entitled…
        – to a religion-supremacist state in as much as possible of geographic Palestine; and
        – to do whatever evil is necessary to secure and maintain it,
        …it’s unlikely that further study will convince them:
        – to dismantle their supremacist construct;
        – to accept responsibility and accountability for past and on-going (war) crimes committed; and
        – to live as equals with non-Jews in (one-state or two-state) geographic Palestine.

        || … And yes, Israel is the Jewish historic homeland. ||

        Neither Israel nor geographic Palestine is the “historic homeland” of people all over the world – citizens of homelands all over the world – who have chosen to embrace the religion-based identity of Jewish.

      • Talkback
        July 17, 2018, 8:47 am

        jon s: “And yes, Israel is the Jewish historic homeland.”

        How can something present be something historic? What do you actually mean with your nonsensical violation of temporal logic?

      • Mooser
        July 17, 2018, 4:15 pm

        “What do you actually mean with your nonsensical violation of temporal logic?”

        He means that he is going to repeat it over and over until it becomes true. He’s got about 27 more assertions to go.

    • Mooser
      July 16, 2018, 11:50 am

      “that anti-Zionists like PW stand little chance of winning over the community “

      Why must anti-Zionism “win over” the Jewish community?
      Why can’t anti-Zionism force Zionism to capitulate? Why can’t anti-Zionism make it necessary for Israel to compromise?

      Or are those 6 million Jews in Israel the most powerful force on earth, which can only be begged or paid to abandon its plans?

    • Talkback
      July 16, 2018, 12:37 pm

      Jon S: “I think that anti-Zionists like PW stand little chance of winning over the community as long as they seem to be indifferent to the needs and survival of the community and offer no real alternative.”

      Sure Jon S. Because there is no obvious real alternative to killing, disenfranchising and dispossessesing Nonjews when it comes to the needs and survival of the community, right?

      • Mooser
        July 16, 2018, 2:25 pm

        .” Because there is no obvious real alternative to killing, disenfranchising and dispossessesing Nonjews “

        And “Jon s” cannot, try as he might, envision any force on earth powerful enough to in any way dissuade Zionism from its goals. So why even consider it?
        No trauma ‘long “Jon s”.

  9. Nathan
    July 16, 2018, 4:04 pm

    It really was a surprise to read in this article a new grievance against Israel (or the Zionists) that I had never heard before:

    “Until I opened that textbook, I had not understood that they overwrote the language of our prayers and our source texts. Biblical Hebrew had not died; they colonized it.”

    I have to admit that this particular grievance sounds really awful. I am quite certain that it is without an historic precedence that a language was “overwritten” and “colonized”. However, I have to admit that I just don’t understand the meaning of “overwriting a language” or “colonizing a language”, and I wonder if the editor of this website has given the matter a moment’s thought. Perhaps it is just good enough that an article is anti-Israel, and it doesn’t really matter if some of the claims simply don’t make sense at all.

    Apparently, this issue at hand is that the author is displeased that the Hebrew language was revived. It was really a very special story, and quite a success. There are linguists today who claim that Hebrew wasn’t revived. Some claim that Modern Hebrew is simply the continuation of Yiddish (“relexified Yiddish”), and others claim that a new language was born (and it should be called “Israeli”). However, the mainstream still maintains that Hebrew is the only example of a language that had no native speakers for centuries, and then it became the native language of millions (i.e. revival).

    Our author complains that “Biblical Hebrew had not died”, but it’s a strange complaint. No one speaks Biblical Hebrew, although native Hebrew speakers today generally understand the Biblical text (but not always). Modern Hebrew was born when the language of the new secular Hebrew literature in 19th century Eastern Europe became the spoken language of a few thousand people in Palestine during the first decade of the 20th century.

    • Mooser
      July 17, 2018, 12:24 am

      .” However, I have to admit that I just don’t understand the meaning of “overwriting a language” or “colonizing a language”,

      Here’s something which might help, “Nathan”. Go and read your own archive, and see what you attempt to do with English. And if you haven’t noticed, your attempt is failing miserably.

      • Nathan
        July 17, 2018, 8:51 pm

        Mooser – Maybe you could be helpful. Please explain to me the meaning of “colonizing a language”. I have never heard this grievance before, and I just can’t imagine what it could possibly mean. After explaining what it means to “colonize a language”, could you please explain to me what is wrong with ““colonizing a language”? Is it as serious as splitting infinitives or using double negatives?

  10. Mooser
    July 18, 2018, 5:39 pm

    “Nathan”, if you don’t understand how you are “colonizing” the language, and what’s wrong with that, you have no business doing what you are doing. No wonder you are so bad at it.

    But this should help you get your outposts and settlements in order.

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