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A Mizrahi appeal against Israel’s Nation State Law

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“My Arabic is mute” by Almog Behar

My Arabic is mute
strangled at the throat
Cursing itself
Without uttering a word
Sleeps in the airless shelters of my soul
Hiding
From relatives
Behind the Hebrew blinds
**Translated by Dimi Reider

The Israeli poet Almog Behar wrote these words long before the “Israel as the Nation-State of the Jewish People Law” passed last summer, sometimes called the Nationality Law. Yet the sentiments foreshadow the legislation that downgraded Arabic from an official language to one of  “special status in the state.” In response at least 50 Mizrahi (Arab Jews, or Jews of Middle Eastern and North African heritage) activists and intellectuals, including myself, filed a complaint with the Israeli High Court of Justice in Jerusalem on January 1, 2019.

The complaint was inspired by an endless stream of emails between the 50 of us in Israel and abroad. We agreed the law is fundamentally unacceptable, offensive, racist and anti-democratic. It undermines the status of 20 percent of the state’s citizens as a national minority, the Arab-Palestinian minority in Israel, as the most obvious problem. Indeed, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu fueled the racist symbolism of this law by posting on Instagram this week and reported in the Guardian, “Israel is the nation state of the Jewish people – and only it.” (Israel’s President rejects Netanyahu’s comments about Arab citizens).

But our petition also points out the lack of Mizrahi lawmakers in the legislative process. With this kind of exclusion, it is no surprise then that the law effectively denies Israel’s Arab history, be it Palestinian or Jewish.

Arab culture, which has always included Jews, Muslims, and Christians, is so much older than the Israel. Moreover, Israel is not a European state. It is located in the Middle East where the majority of Jews are Mizrahi not Ashkenazi.

The Nation State Law violates our rights as Mizrahim to private and collective dignity, to preserve our cultural and historical heritage, to our ties and traditions. We have bonds with the areas in which our cultural identity was formed. It is in this context that we ask what is the place of Mizrahi culture in Israel if the origin is considered inferior by the government?

The court was due to discuss our petition on March 12, yet it informed our lawyer last week the debate is pushed back to June 6, 2019. Some of us have speculated the postponement was due to Israel’s elections which will take place next month and could lead to shuffling in the state attorney’s office.

“The petition was filed due, among other things, to serious flaws in the legislative process due to the absence of comprehensive and in-depth work on the wide impact of the Nation Law on all Israeli society and those of the Jews from the Arab and Islamic countries in particular. The declaration of the annulment of the Nation Law is required sooner rather than later, because of its present and future grave consequences,” a letter from our lawyer, Netta Amar-Shiff, said.

The signatories to the complaint include author Sami Michael, Prof. Yehuda Shenhav, Prof. Henriette Dahan-Kalev, co-founder of the Israeli Black Panther Party and social justice activist Reuven Abergil, spoken word artist Yosi Zabari, Van Leer Institute scholar Dr. Yoni Mendel, psychoanalyst and activist Iris Hefetz, founder of Taayush, activist and historian Prof. Gadi Elgazi, Hebrew University Prof. Yael Berda, NYU Prof. Zvi Ben Dor Benit, activist Sapir Slotker Amran and so many more more.

Arabic, Arab Jews and Mizrahi culture

Here are the sections of the new Nation State Law that concerns language:

“A. The state’s language is Hebrew.

  1. The Arabic language has a special status in the state; Regulating the use of Arabic in state institutions or by them will be set in law.

  2. This clause does not harm the status given to the Arabic language before this law came into effect.”

After the law was passed, leading human rights organizations in Israel such as Adalah and the Association for Civil Rights in Israel both took action to repeal the law. As well Arab members of Knesset filed a complaint in Israel’s High Court and members of the Druze community staged protests with tens of thousands in Tel Aviv opposing the law. But an appeal from an Arab-Jewish, or a Mizrahi, point of view is unique in that it questions the legitimacy of the law from a more nuanced position within Israeli-Jewish society; we oppose the law not only as Israelis concerned about its discrimination towards Palestinian citizens, but as Arab Jews who talk about race, ethnicity and class. We challenge the law as Jews who feel discriminated by it.

In addition to harming the Arab minority in Israel who comprise 20 percent of the population, the Nation State Law erases the history and culture of Arab Jews who immigrated from the Arab world. It is obvious to us, this law gives supremacy to the Hebrew language and by extension to Ashkenazi Jews in Israel, or Jews with heritage from Europe.

Let’s examine how this law looks to Jewish people who emigrated from Arab and Muslim majority countries.

My mom was born in Baghdad and still speaks an Iraqi dialect of Arabic with my grandmother, her mother. There is a revival of Arabic among Arab Jews of my generation. Baghdadi-Iraqi dialect, and more (Yemeni, Moroccan, Tunisian, Syrian) are now taught independently to children who have never visited the countries where the languages and their families lived. A Facebook group called “Persevering the Iraqi language” organizes lessons and a return of the Jewish Iraqi culture. Related, new “Jewish Arab” programs were created both at Tel Aviv University and Ben-Gurion university, responding to this thirst for knowledge about Jewish history in Arab lands.

Moreover, young Mizrahi musicians are using traditional Arabic prayers in contemporary music. Most notably, the three Yemenites sisters formed the band the A-WA. Another famous singer, Dudu Tassa (he opened for the last Radiohead tour), recorded two albums in Iraqi-Jewish dialect. His band, Dudu Tassa and the Kuwaitis, is an homage to his Baghdadi grandfather and great-uncle who were born in Kuwait and also recorded in this dialect. Saleh and Daoud al-Kuwaiti, are acclaimed musicians and their music continues to be played on the radio in Iraq to date.

Yemenite-Israeli members of the music group A-WA in a shoot for Signon Magazine. (Photo: Rotem Lebel/Signon Magazine/a-wamusic.com)

Yemenite-Israeli members of the music group A-WA in a shoot for Signon Magazine. (Photo: Rotem Lebel/Signon Magazine/a-wamusic.com)

Mizrahi communities in Israel continue to make a significant effort to preserve the special connection to the Arabic language, despite Israel’s policy of exclusion and erasure in relation to all aspects of identity and the Arabic language in space. Several activists explained this in statements adjoining the complaint.

Yifat Hillel is one of the founders of the nonprofit Hagar: Jewish Arab Education for Equality, which opened a shared space for Jewish and Arab residents in the Negev. The project is based on the foundations of multiculturalism, bilingualism and equality. Her father’s family came from Tunisia and her mother’s family from Iraq. She wrote a statement about how her organization spreads Arabic in the classroom. I translated an excerpt of her statement here:

“Many told my friends and I that the chance of succeeding in establishing bilingual educational programs in the city with traditional and conservative dominion was weak and delusional. Today, after more than 11 years of activity Hagar has 346 children in various institutions: nurseries, kindergartens, a youth group and an elementary school. Our programs grew and expanded over the years. The work model places the language at the center and sees Hebrew and Arabic not only as tools, but as linguistic spaces that express identity, culture, and relations.”

At the same time that people like Yifat are working towards cultural preservation through language in Israel, we face exploitation or a kind of whitewashing (or in this case, Ashkenazization) for our use of the Arabic language. For instance, for years the Israeli military deployed Arab Jews in Syria, like the famous spy Eli Cohen. Because of their Arab identity, culture and language, they were invaluable intelligence officers. Yet at the same time, this was during an era where you couldn’t hear Arabic on public radio or television channels, or learn Jewish dialects of Arabic in school.

Indeed top students in Israel who study Arabic have job stability in the military (look how a Mizrahi IDF spokesperson became the cultural minister of Israel, to speak of the promotion of Mizrahi people in the IDF). The Israeli Defense Forces runs a counter-terrorism unit that costumes themselves in supposedly Arab dress in order to surveil Palestinians. They can be spotted at protests in Jerusalem and in the West Bank against the ongoing colonization of the Palestinian people. The unit is colloquially referred to as “mista’aravim,” a term that means “Arabized.” Their presence is so ubiquitous these days you can even see actors playing mista’aravim in the hit series “Fauda.”

The Israel government’s use of Arabic in oppression and in the destruction of the Palestinian public space has further created a clear wall between Jewish and Palestinian Arabs. I feel Arabic was stolen from us, as Mizrahi Jews who wished to differentiate ourselves and our use of the language, and placed a negative charge on it.

The Nation State Law supports segregation

Our legal petition also confronts another part of the law that privileges and prioritizes newly constructed Jewish towns in Israel.  The townships this law seeks to establish are mostly gated communities that close their gates to many. Article 7 of the Nation State Law reads,

“7. The state views Jewish settlement as a national value and will labor to encourage and promote its establishment and development.

While seemingly innocuous, these towns claim to first serve Jewish needs and interests, but a closer examination shows that is not the case. What’s important to note here is that “Jewish settlement” and “development” are coded language.

Many of the towns that stand to benefit under the law are in fact segregated communities run by “admissions committees,” a vague term for a private group that can legally deny access to settlements. Generally anyone whose origin is from an unprivileged background including Arabs, Immigrants, and of course, Mizrahim, are excluded. This practice has been long-standing in Israel. Historically the government threw Mizrahi immigrants into the periphery, far away from the power centers in Israeli society.

Mizrahi Jews form an underclass in Israel. Studies have shown our incomes are 30 percent less than Ashkenazi counterparts, meaning often upscale Jewish communities are out of purchasing reach for Mizrahi Jews. Of course our story is different from the story of the Palestinians of 67 or 48 Because we still have some kind of Jewish privilege and they are excluded on many levels in Israel-Palestine.

Therefore, our petition, does not seek to augment or correct the Nation State Law. We want to abolish it as a whole.

Mati Shemoelof

Mati Shemoelof is an Arab-Jewish poet, author and editor based in Berlin. His writing includes six poetry books, and plays, articles and one collection of short stories. His 2018 lecture was printed as a booklet, "Reißt die Mauer…" (Aphorisma Verlag). A German edition of his poems, "Gedicte. Texte zwischen Bagdad, Haifa und Berlin," will be published by the Berlin publisher Aphorisma in 2019. His latest book "An eruption from the east: Re visiting the emergence of the Mizrahi artistic explosion and it's imprint on the Israeli cultural narrative 2006-2019" will be published by Iton 77 publishers in Israel in 2020. He is currently working on a new literary project "Anu אנו نحن: Jews and Arabs writing in Berlin." He is the founder of the the Berlin-based "Poetic Hafla," a group that creates literary and performances events.

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30 Responses

  1. Stephen Shenfield on March 13, 2019, 12:24 pm

    Israel is in Asia geographically but in Europe psychologically. It seems that Europeans also accept it as a European state, otherwise why is Israel allowed to participate in the European song contest? I suppose it is because the ruling stratum has its roots in Europe.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius on March 13, 2019, 4:10 pm

      Israel was always intended to be a state for the European Jews. Early Zionists didn’t even consider non European Jews as possible settlers, and often regarded them as being barely Jewish at all. It was only when the population of European Jews was so decimated by the holocaust that Arab Jews were considered as possible ‘Israelis’.

  2. Maximus Decimus Meridius on March 13, 2019, 4:13 pm

    Do Arab Jews also change their names to ‘Israeli’ ones in the same way that many European Jews do?

  3. YoniFalic on March 13, 2019, 5:26 pm

    Most either translate, change pronunciation, or take a new name.

  4. wdr on March 14, 2019, 4:49 am

    This is rather misleading. The Ashkanazi Jews of Europe did not speak Hebrew. No one spoke Hebrew as a vernacular language- no one- before about 1880. They spoke Yiddish, which is a dialect of German written in Hebrew letters- an Indo-European language. The Zionist movement deliberately discarded Yiddish (or any other Western language) in favour of Hebrew, which is a Semitic language akin to Arabic- in other words, they went from a European to a Middle Eastern language, not the other way around, as this posting says.

    • Keith on March 14, 2019, 11:53 am

      WDR- “The Zionist movement deliberately discarded Yiddish (or any other Western language) in favour of Hebrew, which is a Semitic language akin to Arabic- in other words, they went from a European to a Middle Eastern language….”

      Why revive a modern version of a dead language? If they wanted a “Semitic” language, why not use Arabic to facilitate communicating with their neighbors? Or was their plan to remain apart from the surrounding Arab communities? And for European Jews to linguistically pretend to have a Semitic history?

      • YoniFalic on March 14, 2019, 12:19 pm

        Modern Israeli Hebrew (MIH) is Yiddish both

        1) relexified unsystematically to Hebrew, Aramaic, and some Arabic lexemes and also

        2) cosmetically dressed with elements of the grammar of Rabbinic & Mishnaic Hebrew.

        MIH cannot be considered a Semitic language. It is an artificial language like Esperanto. MIH serves the propaganda purpose of camouflaging a vicious bloodthirsty murderous white racist settler-colonialism that culminated in the genocide of 47-8 and that continues genocidal acts before the eyes of the world.

        In many ways the creation and establishment of Esperanto, which has two million speakers and which had no large funders financing its establishment, is much more impressive.

        When we investigate the creation of the artificial mandatory Hebrew and look behind the curtain, we find that the Zionist movement was rather ineffective in establishing mandatory Hebrew. The mandatory government enabled the Zionist school system to draw upon the extensive British experience in establishing Urdu and Hindi on the base of Hindustani. This development in India was instrumental in whipping up ethnic hostilities.

        Elements of the British government wanted to remain in Palestine permanently and viewed establishment of mandatory Hebrew a key to create permanent hostilities that would give the UK reason to stay in Palestine permanently.

        But for the British Mandatory government the fake artificial language of Modern Israeli Hebrew would never have been successfully established in the Yishuv.

  5. Nathan on March 14, 2019, 10:22 am

    Hebrew was the cultural heritage of the Jewish communities of the Middle East as well, so it was misleading that the author claimed that Hebrew is the language of European Jews, meaning that it is not the language of the Jews who had lived in the Arab world. It certainly was a new angle in the anti-Zionist narrative that I’ve never heard before. There seems to be an inability in this website to present an anti-Zionist agenda while at the same time presenting fairly and accurately the point of view of others. The revival of Hebrew is an amazing achievement of Zionism, and so our author (being anti-Zionist) wishes to take his distance from Hebrew, claiming that his language is Arabic. That’s his view, and he’s entitled to his opinions. However, to leave the impression that this is the viewpoint of the Jews who immigrated to Israel from the Arab world is simply manipulative.

    • Keith on March 14, 2019, 11:44 am

      NATHAN- “The revival of Hebrew is an amazing achievement of Zionism….”

      Why do you think so? In my opinion, the “revival” of (modern) Hebrew serves primarily to facilitate a return to medieval Jewish tribalism, to reinforce a sense of apartness from non-Jews. Also, why modern Hebrew and not Yiddish?

      • Nathan on March 14, 2019, 12:31 pm

        First of all, Keith, the revival of Hebrew is amazing in the technical sense (i.e. how was is done). You might try a little experiment in your spare time and see if you can create a little society in which children become native Sanskrit speakers. Good luck. Secondly, the revival of Hebrew has created a situation in which ordinary people (not just the experts) can read an ancient book which is the source of their civilization. That’s absolutely amazing, and it’s without precedent.

        Why Hebrew and not Yiddish? Hebrew is the heritage of all the Jews, and everyone who came to Israel from all the different lands of Diaspora could identify with it. And that’s what happened.

        Finally, language is an important component of identity (peoplehood). The Danes speak Danish, for example, and you wouldn’t accuse them of “tribalism”. The only reason that “tribalism” bothers you is because you have an anti-Israel prejudice. Everyone belongs to a tribe; i.e. there are those who are your own, and there are those who are foreigners (and they don’t speak your language and they don’t know your culture). Even if your “tribe” has hundreds of millions of speakers, it’s just as “tribal” as being Maltese or Frisian or Polish or Hebrew.

      • eljay on March 14, 2019, 12:51 pm

        || Nathan: … Hebrew is the heritage of all the Jews … language is an important component of identity (peoplehood). The Danes speak Danish … ||

        …and yet the Hebrew-speaking non-Jews of the “Jewish State” continue to be denied their rightful Jewish peoplehood. I wonder why that is.

        Oh, right, it’s because Jewish:
        – is a religion-based identity that can only be acquired by undergoing a religious conversion to Judaism or by being descended from someone who underwent a religious conversion to Judaism; but,
        – is not an identity that can be acquired by being born in or living in “Judea and Samaria” / the “Land of Israel” / the “Jewish State” of Israel, by speaking Hebrew (“the heritage of all the Jews”) or by partaking of Jewish culture.

      • Talkback on March 14, 2019, 1:34 pm

        Nathan: “You might try a little experiment in your spare time and see if you can create a little society in which children become native Sanskrit speakers.”

        You want to compare Hebrew to Sanskrit? Seriously? ROFL.

        Nathan: “… Diaspora…”

        No exile, no diaspora. The “diaspora” is a hoax.

        Nathan: “The Danes speak Danish, for example, and you wouldn’t accuse them of “tribalism”.”

        Nope, because the Danes are the citizens of Danemark. All of them. That’s nationalism. Contrary to the tribalism of the “Jewish state” in which a minority became a majority by expulsion and forcibly changed the language of the native population of this country.

        Nathan: “The only reason that “tribalism” bothers you is because you have an anti-Israel prejudice.”

        The only reason you say this is because you have an anti-Gentile prejudice.

        Nathan: “Everyone belongs to a tribe;”

        Sure, but contrary to the Jewish “tribe” the Danes. Maltese, Polish or the Palestinians are a constitutive people, the people of a country, whether they are Jewish or not. And the Jews will never be a constitutive people, but merely a “tribe” within a nation. The only difference is between being the major or a minor tribe. But Jews will never be a nation in the relevant sense of citizenship.

        Apples and Oranges Nathan, all the time. What’s your agenda?

      • Keith on March 14, 2019, 3:25 pm

        NATHAN- “… see if you can create a little society in which children become native Sanskrit speakers.”

        You make my point. It would be stupid to teach Europeans Sanskrit as a condition of settling in the Middle East. The rather obvious intend was to create an artificial community united by ideology and language uniqueness. To return to a mythological past while simultaneously shunning the surrounding cultures which the original Hebrews were part of. Zionist Jews didn’t return to their Middle Eastern roots, they imposed their European sense of superiority on the descendants of the original Hebrews who converted to Islam as a practical matter.

        NATHAN- “… ordinary people (not just the experts) can read an ancient book which is the source of their civilization.”

        Too funny! Ordinary Jewish Israelis into ancient texts, are they? Other than the Torah, what “ancient texts” are now best sellers? If you are into ancient texts. what “ancient” texts have your read in original Hebrew? Careful, Yoni Falic is going to grade your answer.

        NATHAN- “That’s absolutely amazing, and it’s without precedent.”

        No and no. Please read Yoni Falic’s comment of 3/14 @ 12:19pm above.

        NATHAN- “The Danes speak Danish, for example, and you wouldn’t accuse them of “tribalism”.

        You should be embarrassed over this comment. Danes who move to the US tend to learn to speak English, the language of their surroundings. They don’t require new immigrants to speak “new Norse” and treat the locals like shit. But then again, the US isn’t a Third World country and the Danes aren’t colonial invaders.

        As for Jewish tribalism, Zionism is a reversion to the sectarianism of medieval Judaism and is antithetical to the multiculturalism of present day America.

      • Nathan on March 14, 2019, 4:12 pm

        Gee, Talkback, what is wrong with the term “Diaspora”? Everyone uses the word, and everyone understands the intention. On the other hand, I’ve never come across the term “constitutive people”, and I couldn’t find the phrase in Wikipedia either. Is it your term? How does it translate into Arabic? Anyway, the non-constitutive Jewish people has succeeded in reviving the Hebrew language and even founding a sovereign state – and, amazingly, the earth still keeps spinning on its axis in defiance of the laws of anti-Israel political science.

      • Nathan on March 14, 2019, 5:05 pm

        Keith – Why is it that an anti-Israel person is just incapable of seeing the world through the eyes of others? It’s a mystery. For you, as an anti-Israel activist, “the rather obvious intent was to create an artificial community…” However, this is not about you, and how you see the world. Those who revive the Hebrew language were motivated by the idea of renaissance. They saw it as the renewal of the Jewish civilization. I understand that it might be difficult to imagine that someone else’s intentions are not defined by their ideological adversaries and enemies, but the world is more complicated than your perspective of “let me tell you what you are thinking”.

        Yes, Keith, you have understood correctly that the ancient Hebrew text is the Hebrew Bible. Everyone in Israel studies it in school in the original language. Everyone quotes it at ease in the original language. I understand that for a person with an anti-Israel agenda it is impossible to say “wow”, but this is “wow”. Nowhere on planet earth (except in Israel) is there a child in second grade who can open up a story written in the seventh century BC and understand it (and quote it) as it is in the original language.

        I think that it should be possible for an intelligent person who has an anti-Israel persuasion (but has a bit of self-confidence) to be able to present his anti-Israel case while at the same time to be able to say: “Yes, the revival of Hebrew is quite a special story”. Alas, anti-Israel activists seem to have a fear that any positive statement about Israel might shake their world.

      • Talkback on March 14, 2019, 6:39 pm

        Nathan: “Gee, Talkback, what is wrong with the term “Diaspora”? Everyone uses the word, and everyone understands the intention.”

        Oh the intention is very clear. Everything outside “Eretz Israel” is “in the diaspora”. Why is that, if there has never been an exile? Are Christians who are living outside the “holy land” living in the “diaspora”, too?

        Nathan: “On the other hand, I’ve never come across the term “constitutive people”, and I couldn’t find the phrase in Wikipedia either. Is it your term?”

        ROFL. Learn to use Google. It means the people of a state as defined by its constitution.

        Nathan: “How does it translate into Arabic?”

        قوم الدولة

        Nathan: “Anyway, the non-constitutive Jewish people has succeeded in reviving the Hebrew language and even founding a sovereign state – and, amazingly, the earth still keeps spinning on its axis in defiance of the laws of anti-Israel political science.”

        Yeah, as soon as you realize that you can’t justify it, you refer to the status quo and what was achieved through war and expulsion. You must be really proud of Jewish Apartheid. What an achievement that is.

        Are you going to answer the question, if the pre 48 citizens of Palestine and their descendants have a right to an independent state in their country? I’m going to repeat it until you do.

      • Keith on March 14, 2019, 8:42 pm

        NATHAN- “For you, as an anti-Israel activist….”

        I can hardly be described as an activist and I am not anti-Israel per se, only anti-Zionist. I oppose blood and soil nationalism and the consequences of sectarianism. You don’t?

        NATHAN- “Yes, Keith, you have understood correctly that the ancient Hebrew text is the Hebrew Bible.”

        The mostly atheist Zionists who founded Israel were promoting bible study? Who knew? It would seem to more efficient to promote Hebrew study locally rather than cruelly subjugating the Palestinian Arabs.

        NATHAN- “Nowhere on planet earth (except in Israel) is there a child in second grade who can open up a story written in the seventh century BC and understand it (and quote it) as it is in the original language.”

        New Hebrew isn’t ancient Hebrew. Did you read Yoni Falic’s comment? Besides, look at all of the literature in English, Arabic, French, etc, which has to be translated into New Hebrew for these insular 2nd graders. All of this language crapolla is your after the fact justification for the unjustifiable, and dishonest to boot. None of the early Zionists brought up New Hebrew as a major selling point.

        NATHAN- ” Those who revive the Hebrew language were motivated by the idea of renaissance.”

        What pilpul! Zionism is a rejection of the renaissance and modernity and assimilation. It is retreat into a mythological past. A retreat, I might add, only made possible by the Zionist exploitation of the Holocaust, prior to which Zionism was unpopular with the majority of Jews. Enough said, pilpul master Nathan.

      • RoHa on March 14, 2019, 9:46 pm

        “But then again, the US isn’t a Third World country and the Danes aren’t colonial invaders.”

        Bit off the mark, there, Keith. The Greenlanders and Faeroese might demur a bit. Denmark officially stopped having colonies in 1953.

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danish_overseas_colonies

        And as for the US not being a Third World country …

      • RoHa on March 14, 2019, 10:22 pm

        ‘The Danes speak Danish, for example, and you wouldn’t accuse them of “tribalism”.’

        I actually know Danish, so I hesitate to use the word “speak”. But that aside, the two cases are quite different.

        Danish was not formed by a bunch of Lithuanians and Poles moving to the land, cooking up a communication system from belches, gurgles, and choking noises,and then imposing that on themselves as a language to make themselves into a group separate from everyone else.

        No, Danish originated in what was almost certainly a perfectly respectable old Norse* language, which the group used among themselves all the time, and which slowly changed (Swedes will say not for the better) into the language it is today.

        “Hebrew is the heritage of all the Jews”

        I hold the general principle that all human cultural products are the common “heritage” of all humans, so I need you to explain what makes a dead language the “heritage” of a specific group, especially when the members of that group don’t know it?

        What dead language would count as my “heritage”? Latin? Old English? Peramangk?

        (*My kingdom for a )

      • Talkback on March 15, 2019, 6:04 am

        Nathan: “Nowhere on planet earth (except in Israel) is there a child in second grade who can open up a story written in the seventh century BC and understand it (and quote it) as it is in the original language.”

        That may be what they second graders children in Kahanistan after they teach most of them who also go to religious school that Nonjews are not human. (https://www.haaretz.com/1.5128683)

        But outside of Kahanistan we have:
        Chinese
        Sanskrit (primary language of about 14.000 people)
        Tamil
        Aramaic
        Lithuanian
        Basque
        Irish Gaelic
        Armenian

      • Bumblebye on March 15, 2019, 12:07 pm

        Keith, i must take issue with your claim that the Danes had no colonies!
        I wouldn’t exist if it weren’t for Danish colonies in the Caribbean (who d’ya think sold half the Virgin Islands to the US 100 years ago?!) and colonies in pre-british India (particularly the one in Tamil Nadu whose fort got hammered by the tsunami in ’05).

      • Keith on March 15, 2019, 2:43 pm

        BUMBLEBYE- “Keith, i must take issue with your claim that the Danes had no colonies!”

        I never said that Danes never had colonies. I said that ” Danes who move to the US tend to learn to speak English, the language of their surroundings. They don’t require new immigrants to speak “new Norse” and treat the locals like shit. But then again, the US isn’t a Third World country and the Danes aren’t colonial invaders.” The point being that Danes who move to the US aren’t colonial invaders like the Zionist Jews who conquered Palestine, hence, they adopt the language of their surroundings. The entire history of Zionism is a history of European Jews who claim to be returning to some mythical homeland yet reject the Middle Eastern culture of which this mythical homeland is a part. Instead, they see Israel as a European “villa in the jungle” (Herzl) of the Semitic Arab Middle East.

  6. Ossinev on March 14, 2019, 10:54 am

    @MDM
    “Do Arab Jews also change their names to ‘Israeli’ ones in the same way that many European Jews do?”

    I assume that if there is any flavour of Arabic in their birth names then de rigeur they adapt/change to a more “Jewish” sounding name. Urinating into the hurricane of course because in the only democracy in the etc they are and will always be second class Jewish “citizens”.Still not quite untermenschen like the Arab Israeli “citizens” but definitely looked down on by the ethnically superior European Jewish colonists.

    The European Jews? Well they can brazenly go with the flow – what`s in a name:
    EG From Mileikowsky to Netanyahu to Nitay :

    Now why has no one ever asked the Yahoo why he Angloabbreviated his proud cherished “Jewish” moniker during that little spell in the US ? I wonder what his weasel response would be ?

    • Nathan on March 14, 2019, 3:40 pm

      Netanyahu is a Hebrew name from the Book of Kings (Biblical Hebrew). Nitai is a Hebrew name from the Mishnah (see chapter Pirkei Avot). For you it’s “Angloabbreviated”, because you don’t anything about the Hebrew culture. Both names are Hebrew, and both names appear in the ancient Hebrew text.

  7. Ossinev on March 14, 2019, 2:03 pm

    @Nathan
    “The Danes speak Danish, for example, and you wouldn’t accuse them of “tribalism”.

    Wow I didn`t realize that the Danes were a religious cult ! Goes some way I suppose to explaining all those Scandi – Noir crime thrillers we are getting on UK television.

    I assume that Ragnar was some sort of Moses to them. No record of him having parted the English Channel with the help of God but as Zios well know it`s so easy to re write history to suit your sagas.

  8. Mooser on March 14, 2019, 5:39 pm

    Before the “Nathan-State” law any person who identified as a Jew could, if they were so inclined, feel like they were a partner in the Zionist project.
    But the “Nathan-State” law has made Jewish identity an adversary process. Not a good move, “Nathan”.

  9. Ossinev on March 15, 2019, 8:32 am

    @Nathan
    Still not getting down to the nitay gritty sunshine. Why was he “Ben Nitay” in the US back then? Why did his father change his name from Mileikowsky to Netanyahu? Was that something to do with the Book of Kings?(I don`t think there were many Mileikowskis driven out by those nasty Romans – sob ) Does N junior occasionally revert to the much more Anglo European alias/pet name when sitting around at home with the family enjoying the free meals,champagne and cigars?

    The Yahoo would change his name to Arthur Smith if it helped him stay in power and in the spotlight. He presumably entered the US and lived there with the official ( god given !) name “Netanyahu” on his passport. Why did he choose to refer to himself as “Nitay” then. He appears to be happy to refered to as Netanyahu when he visits the US nowadays to give Trump and all the other uS Ziopuppets the opportunity to moisturise his posterior.

    • Mikhael on March 15, 2019, 1:38 pm

      Ossinev March 15, 2019, 8:32 am
      Why did his father change his name from Mileikowsky to Netanyahu? Was that something to do with the Book of Kings?(I don`t think there were many Mileikowskis driven out by those nasty Romans – sob )

      It’s almost like you’ve never heard that Ashkenazim were forced to adopt surnames by the governments of various states in Europe beginning in the 18th century. In the case of Russian-controlled Poland (where Netanyahu’s forebears came from), an imperial ukaz required Jews to forgo their traditional Hebraic- (and occasionally Yiddish-) derived patrynomics and adopt surnames.
      Read all about it:
      https://www.familysearch.org/wiki/en/Jewish_Names_Personal#Compulsory_Adoption_of_Surnames
      https://jewishcurrents.org/editor/the-origins-and-meanings-of-ashkenazic-last-names-12849/

      At any rate, Netanyahu’s ancestors only bore the Milekowsi name for a few generations beginning not even two centuries ago. It is however quite likely that his descendants will be called Netanyahu for much longer than that, although one never knows if and for how long a given family line will persist. He has one daughter who is ultra-Orthodox and (as is common in that sector) has many children, but her kids don’t have the Netanyahu name. He has one idiot boy, Yair, who may or may not have issue and another kid. His older brother Yoni died as a hero in Entebbe while rescuing other Jews and had no children to survive him. He also has a brother named Iddo who has two kids. But there’s still a decent chance that there will be Hebrew-speaking Jews named Netanyahu living in the State of Israel hundreds of years hence. Hopefully, there will no longer be bitter and angry people insisting that their name is “Milikovski” because a long-dead ancestor was compelled to adopt a non-Jewish name by an anti-Jewish regime.

  10. Ossinev on March 15, 2019, 2:27 pm

    @Mikhael
    Got all that so before becoming or being obliged to become “Mileikowskis” the “Mileikowski” family had another name. Perhaps that was a post conversion to Judaism name in whatever country they were native to (ie not Biblical Israel). I wonder what that name was. Any knowledge / clues ?

    Still doesn`t answer the original question. Why did the Yahoo who originally entered the US on an Israeli passport giving his name as ” Benjamin Netanyahu” and presumably as someone who took pride in the family`s acquired Hebrew name choose to call himself “Ben Nitay” ?

    Was it perchance because it ahem! sounded too Jewish or too foreign to Americans he was endeavouring to ingratiate himself with.According to the thug himself it was apparently because American goyim found “Netanyahu difficult to pronounce”. LOL

  11. Mikhael on March 17, 2019, 4:31 pm

    Ossinev March 15, 2019, 2:27 pm
    @Mikhael
    Got all that so before becoming or being obliged to become “Mileikowskis” the “Mileikowski” family had another name. Perhaps that was a post conversion to Judaism name in whatever country they were native to (ie not Biblical Israel). I wonder what that name was. Any knowledge / clues ?

    As I stated earlier, Netanyahu’s ancestors, who were compelled to adopt a European name and apparently settled on Miliekowski a couple of hundred years ago, like most Ashkenazim, used patrynomics and had no surname, thus the father’s given name functioned as a surname. Ashkenazim are a branch of the Jewish People who trace their ancestry (like almost all Jews do) to the Hebrews, Israelites and Judeans of antiquity who lived in Eres Yisra’el, but who eventually migrated to and developed a unique cultural identity and although some of their lineage clearly includes Southern European female converts who married with exiles from the Land of Israel, their Jewish identity does not derive primarily from a conversion event — it is not a parallel phenomenon to the various Slav or Celtic or Germanic nations arriving at a Christian identity through some conversion en masse to Jesuscult, not like the various pagan goy nations such as the Bulgars adopted.

    Still doesn`t answer the original question. Why did the Yahoo who originally entered the US on an Israeli passport giving his name as ” Benjamin Netanyahu” and presumably as someone who took pride in the family`s acquired Hebrew name choose to call himself “Ben Nitay” ?

    Was it perchance because it ahem! sounded too Jewish or too foreign to Americans he was endeavouring to ingratiate himself with…..it was apparently because American goyim found “Netanyahu difficult to pronounce”. LOL

    Lots of people simplify foreign-sounding names to make it easier pronounce, as many Americans are notoriously ill-equipped to deal with foreign-sounding names. So what?

    Do you think Ken Alinbek is ashamed of being a Kazakh?https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ken_Alibek

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