Two friends meet for 5 minutes in Jerusalem

Israel/Palestine
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Three days ago Maha and Walaa May 16, 2013 Jerusalem

On May 16, Maha, the Palestinian woman on the left in the above photograph, tweeted this photograph of meeting her friend Walaa from Gaza in Jerusalem. A friend in Gaza sent it along to me with this note: 

Walaa made it to Jerusalem for the first time in her life. Here is a picture with her Palestinian friend Maha. They only met for five minutes, full of tears. Injustice!

Walaa is Walaa Al Ghussein. She wrote about the cruel restrictions on travel from Gaza for us last month, and I wrote to her to ask her about the meeting above. At first she politely turned me down, explaining it was “indescribable”. But I persisted, and she provided the following explanation.

It’s not easy for a Gaza resident to get a permit to enter the occupied lands of Palestine, or even to leave Gaza through Erez checkpoint. And it’s impossible for anyone from there to enter Gaza.

Our permanent dream is to meet, one day, in our own land. And we never gave up this dream. But I almost did when I was there, in Jerusalem, not having time to meet one of my friends because of my permit and some restrictions. But my friend refused to give up and managed to follow me to the Gas station while I was on my way back to Gaza.

My friend, Maha came from Umm Al-Fahem to Jerusalem, just to see me for 5 minutes in the Gas station, knowing that I would have to go back to Gaza before 7 pm, because I have a limited permit.

What happened in those five minutes? I met Maha for the first time in my life, in my first visit to Jerusalem, to share with a her a long, deep hug and lots of tears without being able to utter a word, because our tears in such a moment say it all.

Maha was desperate. She started to fight with the driver, begging him to take us to the Old City for awhile, and go back to Gaza in time. But he refused to take such a responsibility, and we started to cry and hug each other again and again ceaselessly, not believing that we actually met, and that our dream is not entirely impossible.

But what power on earth could prevent two people from the same country to meet in their own land? It’s gross what occupation and apartheid can do to us.

What was more painful is stepping up in the car and leaving the Gas station watching Maha standing there in her place crying alone, like it was a dream.

Those five minutes were, heart wrenching, a first meeting and a goodbye at the same time, not sure if she’ll ever see me again. Or if she’ll ever meet her other friends in Gaza on this land.

Yes, I was in Jerusalem, but I didn’t have the time to actually see Jerusalem, and I met Maha, but I didn’t meet my other friends there, not even for five minutes.

But I gave Maha a promise that I’ll be back again soon, and one day, me and our other friends in Gaza will be able to hang out in Jerusalem and the rest of Palestine, without having to get a permit.

I expected this visit to be restricted and short, but I couldn’t imagine how heart wrenching it would be to meet any of my friends from there, and to leave the place.. I didn’t want to go home, because for me, this is my home, and it will always be.

It took me a lot to write, delete, and re-write this again, but whatever I write or say, will not be enough to describe my meeting with Maha, and my whole trip to Jerusalem. Because it’s simply indescribable. I couldn’t say anything during my whole visit, I remained silent with the tears refusing to leave my eyes, and it’s not easy to describe it with words now, I still cry whenever I try to talk about it.

 

I can not fathom living like this. The lifestyle being imposed on Palestinians is a human tragedy of massive proportions.

 (Hat tip Yousef M. Aljamal)

About Annie Robbins

Annie Robbins is Editor at Large for Mondoweiss, a mother, a human rights activist and a ceramic artist. She lives in the SF bay area. Follow her on Twitter @anniefofani

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  1. Woody Tanaka
    May 19, 2013, 3:26 pm

    My one day all of the Palestinians lands be free of occupation and this evil will no longer stalk that land.

  2. Les
    May 19, 2013, 3:52 pm

    Not being the dark swarthy robe-wearing Arab Palestinians our media prefers, don’t look for such accurate images by the NY Times.

    • Daniel Rich
      May 19, 2013, 9:02 pm

      @ Les,

      Off topic.

      Be careful , Les. Tread very lightly now, because the law might put you in the dock together with the widow of a man who died back in 2001.

      Not mentioned in the article is the fact that the court’s ruling is intended to ‘deter future musings along similar lines.’

  3. Annie Robbins
    May 19, 2013, 3:59 pm

    it just make me weep. and to think this is still going on after all these years turning into decades….

  4. just
    May 19, 2013, 4:18 pm

    So this is “modern day” Zionism/Apartheid/and cruel and inhuman treatment.

    (such beautiful humans pictured above, with such supreme, yet wistful, joy in their expressions).

    Thank you Walaa and Annie and Maha.

  5. Daniel Rich
    May 19, 2013, 4:59 pm

    Q: … because I have a limited permit.

    R: But you have unlimited love. Use that force to beat the Apartheid beast.

  6. RoHa
    May 19, 2013, 8:57 pm

    The Jewish State is what matters. Friendship and love must be set aside.

  7. ToivoS
    May 19, 2013, 9:01 pm

    annie, thanks for this. You do have have a good eye for a good and moving story.

  8. W.Jones
    May 19, 2013, 11:52 pm

    One Day We Shall Return

    (⁀‵⁀,)♥ ♥ ♥
    .`⋎´ ♥¸.•°*”˜˜”*°•. ♥
    … ♥¸.•°*”˜˜”*°•. ♥ ♥
    …•°*”˜˜”*°•♥

  9. Obsidian
    May 20, 2013, 1:33 am

    Maha could have driven from her home in Umm al Fahm to meet her friend nearer to Gaza.
    They could have spent all day together, maybe in an cafe or shopping mall in Ashkelon (al-Majdal).

    Maybe next time.

    • Woody Tanaka
      May 20, 2013, 9:26 am

      “Maha could have driven from her home in Umm al Fahm to meet her friend nearer to Gaza.”

      And Jews occupying Palestine can go live in Brooklyn, Poland and Russia and let the Palestinians go anywhere in their land of Palestine that they wish.

    • hophmi
      May 20, 2013, 10:04 am

      It’s not a great situation. But this is what happens when Palestinians dress as civilians, strap on suicide belts, and kill Israelis, Jew and Arab alike. It creates lots of fear. Maha would have had less trouble making this trip 25 years ago.

      • Annie Robbins
        May 20, 2013, 10:24 am

        hops, are you justifying the collective punishment and submission of millions of Palestinians for perpetuity? how convenient this subjugation just so happens to coincide with zionisms end goal, the completely judaization of the land. isn’t that also what you mean by “not a great situation”?

        and we know obsidian’s claim is not true. Many gazans have been subjected to these permits that don’t allow them to roam or hang out in cafes and shopping centers anywhere inside Israel, continually supervised, herded and corralled like cattle.

      • Woody Tanaka
        May 20, 2013, 10:27 am

        “hops, are you justifying the collective punishment and submission of millions of Palestinians for perpetuity?”

        Of course he is. Scratch a zionist, uncover a fascist.

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 10:59 am

        “hops, are you justifying the collective punishment and submission of millions of Palestinians for perpetuity?”

        No, of course not. That’s why we need a peace agreement.

        “how convenient this subjugation just so happens to coincide with zionisms end goal, the completely judaization of the land. isn’t that also what you mean by “not a great situation”?”

        Except that it doesn’t because no one is planning to “Judaize” Gaza. The Jews packed up and left, remember? So it’s about security, not “Judaization.” The “not great situation” is the situation that causes innocent Palestinians to bear the consequences of their terrorist neighbors.

        And complete “Judaization?” Have you forgotten that Israel within the 1967 borders is 20% Palestinian?

      • Annie Robbins
        May 20, 2013, 11:58 am

        The “not great situation” is the situation that causes innocent Palestinians to bear the consequences of their terrorist neighbors.

        iow, collective punishment. lofty words about “a peace agreement” doesn’t change what you’re saying here.

        Except that it doesn’t because no one is planning to “Judaize” Gaza.

        the location we were discussing is jerusalem and areas ‘inside’ israel. or did you forget Obsidian’s ridiculous allegation about walaa and maha spending the day in Ashkelon?

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 12:23 pm

        “iow, collective punishment”

        Is the murder of Israeli civilians collective punishment? Yes, of course it is.

        “the location we were discussing is jerusalem and areas ‘inside’ israel.”

        That part doesn’t seem to be clear. What part of Jerusalem are we talking about? There is always more to the story than what you post here.

      • Light
        May 20, 2013, 12:39 pm

        And complete “Judaization?” Have you forgotten that Israel within the 1967 borders is 20% Palestinian?

        Have you forgotten about the plans to Judaize the Gallilee, the Negev or the 30 Jim Crow laws within Israel?

        The “not great situation” is the situation that causes innocent Palestinians to bear the consequences of their terrorist neighbors.

        Which is the definition of collective punishment.

      • Cliff
        May 20, 2013, 12:57 pm

        hoppie said:
        “And complete “Judaization?” Have you forgotten that Israel within the 1967 borders is 20% Palestinian?”

        So what? Palestinians in Israel are treated as second-class citizens even though they are the indigenous population that Jewish terrorists did not ethnically cleanse in 48′.

        Israel is a Jewish State and a Jewish democracy (democracy for Jews). Palestinians have no agency in Israel. Only lip-service and tokenism.

      • Obsidian
        May 20, 2013, 1:18 pm

        @Annie

        What’s your proof that Mahaa was continually supervised, herded and corralled like cattle.

      • Annie Robbins
        May 20, 2013, 1:56 pm

        go back and read Walaa’s story again Obsidian. Maha chased down Walaa’s transport.

        and to answer your question, i know as much about Walaa’s story as you do as we didn’t chat about it. in fact, after she turned me down she didn’t respond at any of my several appeals. silence. her email just appeared in my inbox interrupting my concentration on another report i was working on, about an hour before it was published here. her response blew my mind.

        so she (Walaa) never claimed to be “continually supervised, herded and corralled like cattle. ”

        the reason i reacted so strongly to the original email w/photo and link to the tweet accompanied by my friends text ” They only met for five minutes, full of tears. Injustice!” is because i had heard about this sort of strange travel before from other gazans in conversation. i was literally flabberghasted when i first heard about it. being ushed around and not allowed off the transport vehicle and in constant supervision. this is why i suspected as much and wanted to hear walaa’s story. i did not however , communicate my suspicions. i just wanted to know her story. this is an aspect of palestinian life most americans are unaware of and even many activists (such as myself ) might not be aware of. it’s strange behavior in the extreme.

        i never knew of these partial permits that require constant supervision. walaa doesn’t say this, but one could surmise it. i never really thought about it for sick people either, they are probably treated like prisoners from leaving gaza and making the journey to the hospital. there’s so much we don’t know about palestinian life. and so much horrible stuff going on often the less radical stuff goes unmentioned. like the race for water at 4:46 in Mohammad al-Azza’s award winning video.

        link to mondoweiss.net

        imagine the humiliation to wait for water from an occupier who steals all yours, just to be able to do your dishes and then race to collect it. and they are the lucky ones on the WB, because it’s not salt water like it is in gaza.

        seriously, it’s endless. i could go on forever. this is one small story that takes place over a 5minute interval, and because of walaa … this story will go out to the world, as it should, teaching us how the planners of apartheid design palestinian submission.

        thanks for asking.

      • Bumblebye
        May 20, 2013, 2:06 pm

        Hop:
        “And complete “Judaization?” Have you forgotten that Israel within the 1967 borders is 20% Palestinian?”

        Annie wrote ” judaization of the land”. Through state theft, that stands at around 95% within Israel. You should read more carefully.

      • Woody Tanaka
        May 20, 2013, 2:34 pm

        “The “not great situation” is the situation that causes innocent Palestinians to bear the consequences of their terrorist neighbors. ”

        No, the thing that “causes innocent Palestinians to bear the consequences of their terrorist [sic] neighbors” is the racist ideology of zionism, nothing else. Your blood libel of blaming the victim is disgusting.

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 2:50 pm

        “Your blood libel of blaming the victim is disgusting.”

        Blood libel? LOL. Palestinian terrorism is a fact, Woody.

      • Cliff
        May 23, 2013, 4:23 am

        Saying Palestinian terrorism is a fact, is besides the point.

        You blame all Palestinians and justify racial profiling for the actions of Palestinian terrorists.

        And the context is clearly your support for Jewish terrorists during the Mandate era and your slandering of all Palestinians as Hitlerites and Nazis and your approval of the Nakba as a consequence of Palestinian rejection of Zionism.

        Etc. etc. – you’re a racist troll that Phil tolerates for demographic purposes.

      • Woody Tanaka
        May 20, 2013, 10:25 am

        “It’s not a great situation. But this is what happens when Palestinians dress as civilians, strap on suicide belts, and kill Israelis, Jew and Arab alike. It creates lots of fear. Maha would have had less trouble making this trip 25 years ago.”

        No, it’s what happens when a foreign ideology imposes an ethno-religious apartheid regime, enacting an ethnic cleansing and slow-motion cultural genocide on a people in their land. There’s never been a moment since the zionists started this phase of their war, in 1947, that they haven’t been stomping on the faces of the native people.

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 2:40 pm

        “No, it’s what happens when a foreign ideology imposes . . . ”

        No, actually, it really is what happens when terrorists kill people at random. These sorts of restrictions were not in place 25 years ago, and there’s a reason why.

      • eljay
        May 20, 2013, 10:31 am

        >> It’s not a great situation. But this is what happens when Palestinians dress as civilians, strap on suicide belts, and kill Israelis, Jew and Arab alike.

        As usual, a hateful and immoral Zio-supremacist glosses over the ugly reality of…
        - Jewish terrorism and the ethnic cleansing of Palestinians from their homes and lands,
        - the creation of an oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State” in Palestine, and
        - the supremacist “Jewish State’s” 60+ years, ON-GOING and offensive (i.e., not defensive) campaign of aggression, oppression, theft, colonization, destruction and murder,
        …and simply blames the Palestinians for the resulting “not a great situation”.

        Which, once again, proves that:
        - Zio-supremacists truly are hateful and immoral people; and
        - aggressor-victimhood is such a tough gig. :-(

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 2:44 pm

        “As usual, a hateful and immoral Zio-supremacist glosses over the ugly reality of…”

        As usual, you’re ignoring my argument and making an ad hominem attack, and as usual, the moderator is allowing you to do it despite the fact that it’s against the rules.

        “- Jewish terrorism and the ethnic cleansing of Palestinians from their homes and lands,”

        Jews were also ethnically cleansed from some neighborhoods during the 1948 War. I don’t see you talking about it.

        “- the creation of an oppressive, colonialist, expansionist and supremacist “Jewish State” in Palestine, and”

        A less oppressive state than any in the region. The attachment of other leftist buzzwords doesn’t fool anyone outside of the cult.

        “- the supremacist “Jewish State’s” 60+ years, ON-GOING and offensive (i.e., not defensive) campaign of aggression, oppression, theft, colonization, destruction and murder,”

        Uh-huh. Where have most deaths in the Arab world occurred since 1948? Not Israel.

        “…and simply blames the Palestinians for the resulting “not a great situation”.”

        Yes, because I’m able to see the conflict as a conflict, not as a black and white child’s game.

      • Les
        May 20, 2013, 11:29 am

        So that’s what Palestinians look like when dressed as “civilians.” The most important Jewish institution in the US is our big print and broadcast media outlets. Can you think of any other institution that has done more to racialize Palestine/Israel?

      • marc b.
        May 20, 2013, 11:46 am

        Maha would have had less trouble making this trip 25 years ago.

        25 years ago? you mean during the 1st intifada?

      • Cliff
        May 20, 2013, 12:56 pm

        And Israelis blow up Palestinians more often (10 times more children alone).

        And Israelis occupy and colonize Palestinian land.

        And Israelis carve the Star of David into Palestinian land.

        And Israelis spray paint ‘Gas the Arabs’ on Palestinian homes.

        The reason for this ‘not a great situation’ is Jewish colonialism – not Palestinian suicide bombing. Suicide bombing began in 1994 and ended several years ago.

        But all throughout that time period – as well as before and after – Israelis are still killing Palestinian civilians.

        Hence, it’s not Palestinian behavior or agency – it’s Israeli Jewish behavior and agency because that is where the power lies.

        So we should profile Jews the same way that Jews profile Palestinians, Arabs in general, and Muslims.

        Not to mention Jews deny Palestinian suffering or trivialize it or blame the victims themselves and say that Jewish blah blah is more important.

        This is a tribal conflict and Zionist Jews have the power, so they can dictate the daily events of Palestinian life.

      • hophmi
        May 20, 2013, 2:48 pm

        “And Israelis blow up Palestinians more often (10 times more children alone).”

        I’m not aware of a campaign by Israelis to kill as many Palestinians as possible. That has been Hamas’s campaign in the past. There’s no disagreement that Israelis have bigger weapons than the Palestinians do and that more Palestinians die than Israeli do. This says nothing about motivations.

        “The reason for this ‘not a great situation’ is Jewish colonialism – not Palestinian suicide bombing. Suicide bombing began in 1994 and ended several years ago.”

        The restrictions on movement have something to do with the end of suicide bombing, whether you care to admit it or not.

        “Hence, it’s not Palestinian behavior or agency – it’s Israeli Jewish behavior and agency because that is where the power lies.”

        You can argue that. I disagree.

        “So we should profile Jews the same way that Jews profile Palestinians, Arabs in general, and Muslims.”

        Well, when Jews start strapping on suicide belts in significant numbers, I’d guess they would be profiled.

        “Not to mention Jews deny Palestinian suffering or trivialize it or blame the victims themselves and say that Jewish blah blah is more important.”

        Many people, not just Jews, have a different view on Palestinian suffering than the Palestinians and their fellow travelers in the West, and yes, some do believe Jews have a right to self-determination.

        “This is a tribal conflict ”

        It’s nice to see you admit that it’s a conflict.

      • Cliff
        May 23, 2013, 7:06 am

        no, not many people

        just Zionist Jews and their ideological allies

        normal people (non-tribal) can identify the power dynamic as being that of master (Israeli Jews) and slaves (Palestinians)

        Israel kills more people and more civilians because it can get away with it

        if Hamas kills one person or fires crude rockets without guidance systems and which are ineffective, the Palestinian civilians suffer for it because Israel kills them indiscriminately

        so the issue isn’t power, but that plays a role, the issue is what people can get away with and Zionist Jews (like you) get away with murder, theft, and lies quite easily

      • eljay
        May 23, 2013, 8:43 am

        >> … some [people] do believe Jews have a right to self-determination.

        If “self-determination” means “a supremacist ‘Jewish State’”, some people either are hateful and immoral supremacists, or have been deceived by hateful and immoral Zio-supremacists.

        Jews do not have a right to a supremacist state. No group is entitled to a supremacist state.

      • RoHa
        May 23, 2013, 11:50 pm

        “some do believe Jews have a right to self-determination.”

        But do they have any response to the arguments against it?

      • pjdude
        May 20, 2013, 11:46 pm

        bs. the jews started the attacking the palestinians the terror you complain about was of the fear you and yours caused.

  10. DICKERSON3870
    May 20, 2013, 4:27 am

    RE: I can not fathom living like this. The lifestyle being imposed on Palestinians is a human tragedy of massive proportions.” ~ Annie Robbins

    MY COMMENT: I betcha Franz Kafka could fathom living like that! ! !

    FROM WIKIPEDIA [The Metamorphosis]:

    [EXCERPTS] The Metamorphosis (German: Die Verwandlung, also sometimes translated as The Transformation) is a novella by Franz Kafka, first published in 1915. It has been cited as one of the seminal works of fiction of the 20th century and is studied in colleges and universities across the Western world. The story begins with a traveling salesman, Gregor Samsa, waking to find himself transformed into a monstrous vermin. It is never explained in the story why Samsa transforms, nor did Kafka ever give an explanation.

    • Part I

    One day Gregor Samsa, a traveling salesman, wakes up to find himself transformed into a “ungeheures Ungeziefer”, literally “monstrous vermin”, often interpreted as a giant bug or insect. He believes it is a dream, and reflects on how dreary life as a traveling salesman is. He looks at the wall clock and realizes that he has overslept and missed his train for work. He ponders on the consequences of this delay, and is annoyed at how his boss never accepts excuses or explanations from any of his employees no matter how hard working they are, displaying an apparent lack of trusting abilities. Gregor’s mother knocks on the door and he answers her. She is concerned for Gregor because he is late for work, which is unorthodox for Gregor. Gregor answers his mother and realizes that his voice has changed, but his answer is short so his mother does not notice the voice change. His sister, Grete, to whom he was very close then whispers through the door and begs him to open the door. All his family members think that he is ill and ask him to open the door. He tries to get out of bed but he is incapable of moving his body. While trying to move, he finds that his office manager, the chief clerk has showed up to check on him. He finally rocks his body to the floor and calls out that he will open the door shortly.
    Feeling offended by Gregor’s delayed response in opening the door, the clerk warns him of the consequences of missing work. He adds that his recent performance has been unsatisfactory. Gregor disagrees and tells him that he will open the door shortly. Nobody on the other side of the door could understand a single word he uttered (Gregor was unaware of the fact that his voice has also transformed) and conclude that he is seriously ill. Finally, Gregor manages to unlock and open the door with his mouth. He apologizes to the office manager for the delay. Horrified by the sight of Gregor’s appearance, the manager bolts out of the apartment, while Gregor’s mother faints. Gregor tries to catch up with him but his father drives him back into the bedroom with a cane and a rolled newspaper. Gregor injures himself squeezing back through the doorway, and his father slams the door shut. Gregor, exhausted, falls asleep.

    • Part II

    Gregor wakes and sees that someone has put milk and bread in his room. Initially excited, he quickly discovers that he has no taste for milk, once one of his favorite foods. He settles himself under a couch. The next morning, his sister comes in, sees that he has not touched the milk, and replaces it with rotting food scraps, which Gregor happily eats. This begins a routine in which his sister feeds him and cleans up while he hides under the couch, afraid that his appearance will frighten her. Gregor spends his time listening through the wall to his family members talking. They often discuss the difficult financial situation they find themselves in now that Gregor can’t provide for them. Gregor had plans of sending Grete to the conservatorium to pursue violin lessons, something that everyone else including Grete considered to be a dream. Gregor was however pretty determined to do so on the same Christmas before which the metamorphosis occurs. His incapability of being the provider of his family as well as his shattered dreams in respect to his sister coupled with his speechlessness reduces his thought process to a great respect. Gregor also learns that his mother wants to visit him, but his sister and father will not let her.
    Gregor grows more comfortable with his changed body. He begins climbing the walls and ceiling for amusement.
    Discovering Gregor’s new pastime, Grete decides to remove some of the furniture to give Gregor more space. She and her mother begin taking furniture away, but Gregor finds their actions deeply distressing. He tries to save a picture on the wall of a woman wearing a fur hat, fur scarf, and a fur muff. Gregor’s mother sees him hanging on the wall and passes out. Grete calls out to Gregor—the first time anyone has spoken directly to him since his transformation. Gregor runs out of the room and into the kitchen. The father throws apples at Gregor, and one of them sinks into a sensitive spot in his back and remains lodged there, paralyzing his movements for a month and damaging it permanently. Gregor manages to get back into his bedroom but is severely injured.

    • Part III

    One evening, the cleaning lady leaves Gregor’s door open while the boarders lounge about the living room. Grete has been asked to play the violin for them, and Gregor who usually took care to avoid crossing paths with anyone in the flat, in the midst of his depression and thus caused detachment, creeps out of his bedroom to listen. The boarders, who initially seemed interested in Grete, grow bored with her performance, but Gregor is transfixed by it. One of the boarders spots Gregor and they become alarmed. Gregor’s father tries to shove the boarders back into their rooms, but the three men protest and announce that they will move out immediately without paying rent because of the disgusting conditions in the apartment.
    Grete, who has by now become tired of taking care of Gregor and is realizing the amount of burden his existence puts on each one in the family, tells her parents that they must get rid of Gregor or they will all be ruined. Her father agrees, wishing Gregor could understand them and would leave of his own accord. Gregor does in fact understand and slowly moves back to the bedroom. There, determined to rid his family of his presence, Gregor dies.
    Upon discovering that Gregor is dead, the family feels a great sense of relief.
    The father kicks out the boarders and decides to fire the cleaning lady, who has disposed of Gregor’s body. The family takes a trolley ride out to the countryside, during which they consider their finances. Months of spare living as a result of Gregor’s condition have left them with substantial savings. They decide to move to a smaller apartment than the present one to further save their finances, an act which they were unable to carry out in Gregor’s presence. During this short trip, Mr. and Mrs. Samsa realize that in spite of going through hardships which have brought an amount of paleness to her face, Grete appears to have grown up into a pretty and well figured lady, which leads her parents to think about finding her a husband. . .

    SOURCE – link to en.wikipedia.org

    • DICKERSON3870
      May 20, 2013, 4:42 am

      P.S. Silly me, I forgot to include the musical score!
      ● Philip Glass: Metamorphosis (full album: 2006), piano Branka Parlic [VIDEO, 1:12:46] – link to youtube.com

      • Les
        May 20, 2013, 11:47 am

        Way back when I bought Glass’ The Photographer based on the LP cover. It was a terrific introduction to his genius.

      • DICKERSON3870
        May 21, 2013, 5:44 am

        Some of his music has an almost trance-inducing quality to it.
        Philip Glass – Tirol Concerto – Movement II (Part 2) [VIDEO, 9:04] – link to youtube.com

        AND HE IS A FASCINATING INDIVIDUAL:
        “Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve Parts”, 2007, NR, 115 min
        Filmmaker Scott Hicks (Shine, 1996) takes you behind the scenes to spend a year in the life of legendary composer Philip Glass as he travels the globe writing and recording music. Featuring exclusive interviews with Glass’s family and colleagues as well as glimpses into the composer’s private life, this portrait of one of modern music’s most celebrated talents also includes appearances by Ravi Shankar, Woody Allen and Martin Scorsese.
        • Netfix DVD – link to dvd.netflix.com
        • Internet Movie Database – link to imdb.com
        Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve PartsTrailer [VIDEO, 02:50] — link to youtube.com
        THIS DOCUMENTARY IS ALSO ON YouTube.
        Part 1 (VIDEO, 51:36) — link to youtube.com
        Part 2 (VIDEO, 1:07:36) — link to youtube.com

      • DICKERSON3870
        May 21, 2013, 6:32 am

        P.S. Glass: A Portrait of Philip in Twelve Parts: Bonus Material, 2007, NR, 180 minutes
        The bonus material for the intimiate look at this great American composer includes additional interviews and the following performances: Kronos Quartet’s “Dracula” rehearsal, Metamorphosis’ Solo performances, “Orion” and an “Einstein on the Beach” Adelaide rehearsal.
        Format: DVD
        Netflix listing – link to dvd.netflix.com

  11. seafoid
    May 20, 2013, 9:46 am

    It is a system , not a tragedy . A cruel system .

  12. Yousef M. Aljamal
    May 20, 2013, 9:56 am

    Welcome to the only ‘democracy’ in the Middle East!

    • Annie Robbins
      May 20, 2013, 2:34 pm

      thank you yousef. i am so glad i met you. you really exemplify CPDS’s definition

      facilitating Palestinians representing themselves “in the tongues of its own people” to convey their own message to the world and enhance Palestine’s presence in world forums and international organizations.

      you’re a good friend, a good person and you’ve enriched my life and taught me a lot.

    • Obsidian
      May 22, 2013, 1:25 pm
      • Annie Robbins
        May 22, 2013, 2:05 pm

        obsidian, israel started the gaza massacre of 08-09 by claiming hamas was planning on kidnapping someone. these preemptive arrests based on israeli allegations are just not compelling coming from a government that is constantly lying. and one of the people was in a wheelchair. btw, did you notice israel abducted another young talented palestinian yesterday. no charges. link to palsolidarity.org

        israel arrests people based on nothing all the time, so just because they pretend to have a justification this time, they would or could have arrested them without one. it’s completely meaningless. if israelis were arrested for planning a crime, the entire government would be in jail.

      • Obsidian
        May 24, 2013, 10:48 am

        @Annie

        No. The ceasefire between Hamas and Israel, 2008, ended when Hamas was discovered to be building a kidnap tunnel (ala Gilad Shalit) along Israel’s border fence. Israel bombed the tunnel, killing two Hamasniks. Tit lead to tat and the rest is history.

      • Annie Robbins
        May 24, 2013, 11:44 am

        obsidian, everyone already knows israel alleged they had some insider’s knowledge (aka ‘leak’ ‘intel’ or otherwise known as bs/hasbara) hamas was intending on kidnapping which they threw up as an excuse to preemptively invade and kill 6 (not 2) people thereby breaking the ceasefire.

        of course, there was no proof and no evidence presented whatsoever “Hamas was discovered to be building a kidnap tunnel “. the nyt headline screamed ‘israel breaks ceasefire’ because …they did.

        Israel blew up an underground bunker filled with military personnel. that’s not proof of anything other than israel wanting to get their war on, the one they planned for over 6 months, right after agreeing to a ceasefire. it’s been reported over and over.

        even wiki timeline phrases it as an allegation:

        On November 4, 2008, Israel launched a military incursion into a residential area of Dayr al-Balah in central Gaza. Israel stated its aim was to destroy what it said was a tunnel on the Gaza-Israel border dug by militants to infiltrate into Israel and abduct soldiers, however an Israeli defense official was quoted in the Washington Times acknowledging that Israel wanted to “send Hamas a message.”[85] According to Israel, the raid was not a violation of the ceasefire, but a legitimate step to remove an immediate threat. Israeli infantry, tanks, and bulldozers entered 250 m into the Gaza Strip, the first major incursion since the June truce. A gunfight broke out, in which one Hamas fighter was killed. Hamas responded with a barrage of mortar and rocket fire at Israeli troops. Three Israeli airstrikes on Hamas mortar and rocket positions then killed five Hamas fighters. According to eyewitnesses, another three Hamas fighters were wounded in an Israeli UAV strike over the el-Burejj refugee camp.[86] Three Israeli soldiers were also wounded during the operation. Hamas said it would take revenge for what it perceived as an act of Israeli aggression that had violated the truce.[86][87] Hamas launched 35 rockets into southern Israel in what was described by Hamas spokesman Fawzi Barhoum as a “response to Israel’s massive breach of the truce, stating that “The Israelis began this tension and they must pay an expensive price. They cannot leave us drowning in blood while they sleep soundly in their beds.”[88][89]

        link to en.wikipedia.org

        iow, hamas was never ‘discovered’ to be building anything. israel just broke the ceasefire, stared a war (mowing the lawn ) and framed it as preemptive. how original/not.

      • Woody Tanaka
        May 24, 2013, 11:50 am

        “a kidnap tunnel (ala Gilad Shalit) ”

        Shalit wasn’t kidnapped. He was a prisoner of war.

      • Cliff
        May 24, 2013, 12:27 pm

        Gilad Shalit was not kidnapped. He is a soldier of the occupying government and army and was CAPTURED.

        Israel broke the cease-fire and refused another when Hamas wanted to extend it to the West Bank.

        Israel instigated the Gaza massacre of 2008.

  13. Fathi Alhaj
    May 20, 2013, 2:53 pm

    When i was their in this moment while Walaa and Maha are crying with a tears falling from every eye in the place
    one thing just come in our minds all ( why we can’t stay more, this is our land , our place , My capital why we should leave it now )
    I wish to me and to all of you can go their not for hours but BUT MORE

  14. LanceThruster
    May 20, 2013, 3:51 pm

    Life happens in the margins. This so trivial and yet its pettiness is meant to have a powerful cumulative effect. It reaffirms that no intrusion is too inconsequential to miss out on the opportunity to impose your will. It is meant to unshakably instill the resignation to anything those exercising power enact.

    It is in the model of breaking a wild animal.

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