Clinton Foundation’s ‘good friend’ Bahrain quashed Arab spring without protest from Sec’y Clinton

Middle East

Lots of news organizations have picked up on the fact that Secretary of State Hillary Clinton met with the Crown Prince of Bahrain after his family gave millions of dollars to the Clinton Foundation. “Good friend of ours,” as a Foundation official put it.

But no one has yet explored the possible foreign policy consequences of that gift. Bahrain violently put down its Arab Spring, not long after those contributions.

And Clinton had very little to say against the Bahrain repression of nonviolent protesters.

Here’s the New York Times report on the latest email drop involving Clinton at State:

The emails, drawn from [aide Huma] Abedin, included an appeal by Douglas Band, a Clinton Foundation executive, for Mrs. Clinton to meet with Bahrain’s crown prince, whose family had contributed millions of dollars to the foundation.

“Good friend of ours,” Mr. Band wrote.

Ms. Abedin, after expressing Mrs. Clinton’s reluctance to schedule a meeting “until she knows how she will feel,” then wrote back to Mr. Band to offer the crown prince an appointment the next morning. She encouraged Mr. Band to let the prince know, “if you see him,” though she said the State Department had also contacted him through official channels.

That exchange was in 2009, according to Judicial Watch, which released the emails. The rightwing organization says that Clinton declined to meet the Crown Prince except when he went through the Clinton Foundation:

Included among the Abedin-Band emails is an exchange revealing that when Crown Prince Salman of Bahrain requested a meeting with Secretary of State Clinton, he was forced to go through the Clinton Foundation for an appointment. Abedin advised Band that when she went through “normal channels” at State, Clinton declined to meet. After Band intervened, however, the meeting was set up within forty-eight hours. According to the Clinton Foundation website, in 2005, Salman promised to set up the Crown Prince’s International Scholarship Program (CPISP) for the Clinton Global Initiative. And by 2010, it had contributed $32 million to CGI.

Bahrain’s timing was fortuitous. The Arab Spring in Bahrain, which attracted more than 100,000 peaceful protesters, was put down violently in February-March 2011 with the assistance of the Saudis. Remember when Saudi troops crossed the causeway? Wikipedia:

On 14 March 1,000 troops from Saudi Arabia and 500 troops from UAE entered Bahrain and crushed the uprising. A day later, King Hamad declared martial law and a three-month state of emergency

Clinton was asked about Bahrain during a press conference in Cairo on March 15, 2011.

Well, we call for calm and restraint on all sides in Bahrain. We’re particularly concerned about increasing reports of provocative acts and sectarian violence by all groups. The use of force and violence from any source will only worsen the situation and create a much more difficult environment in which to arrive at a political solution.

So our advice to all sides is that they must take steps now to negotiate toward a political resolution. The security issues are obviously important because there has to be an environment of stability and security in order for these talks to proceed. But it is important that everyone abide by that. And we know that the Government of Bahrain requested assistance from their fellow members in the Gulf Cooperation Council. We regret that the dialogue that was attempted had not started, and we call on all sides immediately to begin that dialogue and to look for ways to compromise to arrive at a peaceful resolution.

Her remarks seem to blame the democracy protesters for “provocative acts.” Clinton began her remarks that day by celebrating the Egyptian revolution of a month before:

I want to begin by saying very clearly and directly to the people of Egypt that this moment of history belongs to you, that this is your achievement and you broke barriers and overcame obstacles to pursue the dream of democracy, and the United States and President Obama and I will stand with you as you make this journey.

Bahrain went ahead with a full-on crackdown on the democracy protests. Wikipedia says 80 died in the crackdown, and journalists were imprisoned and tortured.

Clinton had plenty of time to reflect as she prepared her 2014 memoir of her State Department years, Hard Choices. The 495-page paperback version includes only a brief, confusing criticism of the Bahraini repression. In the original hardback edition, some 100 pages longer, Clinton does say more about Bahrain. She says she didn’t criticize the Bahraini monarchs because she needed their help to build an international coalition to go into Libya and “prevent a much larger abuse — a full-fledged massacre.” She wrote, “We continued to speak out in the months that followed, emphasizing that mass arrests and brute force were at odds with the universal rights of Bahrain’s citizens and would not make legitimate calls for reform go away.” (Why did she remove even this mild criticism from the paperback version?)

So here’s the question. Did the Bahraini monarchs contribute to the Clinton Global Initiative just as you would buy an insurance policy, in case they were to eventually need diplomatic support from Secretary Clinton? And would the U.S. have spoken out more forcefully against the Bahraini repression at the time if the Clinton Foundation had never existed?

About James North and Philip Weiss

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53 Responses

  1. silamcuz
    August 24, 2016, 6:23 am

    What a disgusting display of yellow journalism. The foundation receives money from a huge variety of state and private donors that happen to share its goals and objectives. Why single out Bahrain, as if the people running the foundation has any means to investigate the donors for their complicity in whatever type of repression Phil may feel to be happening, every time someone from Bahrain offers their donations.

    Also Phil, I find it quite sickening for you to not even mention the fact that Qatar, the progressive nation bordering Bahrain, also contribute large amounts to the foundation. The same Qatar that is the leading financial and diplomatic backer of the BDS movement. The BDS movement that is currently gaining global support against Israel and is fast becoming the movement that will eventually uproot Zionism and hold Israel accountable for its crimes against humanity.

    • justicewillprevail
      August 24, 2016, 11:40 am

      So now you’re a shill for Clinton (the ‘white supremacist’). lol, willingly turn a blind eye to the repression in Bahrain. And repeat the zionist hysteria about Qatar, of which evidence they tout the funding of one conference, yikes. Qatar, btw, a similarly repressive regime to Bahrain. But that’s ok with you.. Too funny. Do make your mind up.

      • silamcuz
        August 24, 2016, 9:15 pm

        Justicewillprevail,

        LOL have you even stepped foot on Qatar? Do you know any Qatari folks? Trust me they are one of the most content, happy people in the world and appreciate their government greatly for their dutiful care of all Qataris.

      • silamcuz
        August 24, 2016, 9:37 pm

        If Qatar is repressive, then I can only wish the US and all other countries to follow and learn the ways to be as repressive as Qatar.

        No crime, no widespread mental and psychological issues, no school shooting, no rape in colleges, no mass incarcerations, respectful and polite people, women are happy, safe and free, men are full of pride and self-assured, no toxic masculinity, no misogyny or racism. Seriously, if I was fortunate enough to be a Qatari, I would go to bed every night praying for the repression to never stop.

      • justicewillprevail
        August 27, 2016, 4:43 pm

        Yes, I have been to Qatar, which was extremely educational, and is nothing like the paradise you claim in your fantasy. Just google human rights there, or talk to any of the construction workers, but beware of getting them in trouble.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 5:33 pm

        “women are strong happy, safe and free, men are handsome, full of pride and self-assured, no toxic masculinity, no misogyny or racism, and all the children are above average.”

        Sounds like that fabled oasis, long celebrated by the Persian poets, of “Lake Woebegone.”

        (And now that I know for sure it’s not a sign of “toxic masculanity” I have got to get me one of those ceremonial daggers to wear on the front of my belt!)

      • Kay24
        August 28, 2016, 6:57 am

        Silamcuz, the Qataris may be happy, but that is because they are well looked after by their government, from the time they are born – free education and even given homes. They should be happy especially when they are so fortunate and have others do their dirty work.

        On the other hand those they hire from third world nations, especially the laborers, are treated very badly, live in deplorable conditions, and Qatar has been criticized harshly for their treatment of these poor people.

        http://www.bbc.com/news/world-middle-east-35931031

    • Mooser
      August 24, 2016, 6:17 pm

      “as if the people running the foundation has any means to investigate the donors for their complicity in whatever type of repression”

      Yes, the Clinton Foundation has a unique fund-raising method which precludes any investigation of donors!
      The funds manager sit in a darkened, sealed room, with a dollar-bill size slit in the door. All day money comes through it, and drops softly into the Axminster. Heck, they can’t even count it till the day is over, and somebody brings a flashlight.

      • silamcuz
        August 24, 2016, 9:49 pm

        Even journalists dedicated to exposing Bahrain have a hard time documenting who is responsible for the crimes against minorities, and to what extent. And these people have a intimate interests in doing exactly that, but to date all the news articles and editorials I have read on Bahrain fail to convince me that there is an apartheid going on against the Shia citizens.

        Plus, the foundation is not selling any products. The donations are made free of any strings attached and out of good-will. If the Bahrainis feel the can somehow secure their supposed illegitimate grip on power by donating to the Clinton Foundation, I would like to know why.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 5:40 pm

        “The donations are made free of any strings attached and out of good-will.”

        Sure, it just drops in through the slot, and nobody knows how it got there. Or who brought it.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 7:36 pm

        ” fail to convince me that there is an apartheid going on against the Shia citizens.”

        Yours is the only mention of the word “apartheid” on this page.
        So what would you call what is “going on against the Shia citizens”?
        Is it genocide? Is it discrimination? Is it segregation? Just the healthy give-and-take of multi-cultural democratic societies?
        Nobody said anything about “apartheid” except you, as usual.

  2. Boomer
    August 24, 2016, 8:46 am

    re “And Clinton had very little to say against the Bahrain repression of nonviolent protesters.”

    U.S. policy was shameful, regardless of what motivated it.

    • eljay
      August 24, 2016, 8:53 am

      || Boomer: … U.S. policy was shameful, regardless of what motivated it. ||

      Sadly, it won’t be any less shameful under Clinton (or Trump).

      • Lillian Rosengarten
        August 24, 2016, 10:49 am

        I completely disagree and find this to be a dangerous comparison. Although Hillary’s neo con connections cause strong anxiety and fear, she can still be influenced to make changes. and has a more progressive domestic agenda. There is a strong grass roots progressive movement that will need to have a united voice. Hopefully congress will change hands. Don’t forget the supreme court nominations are of major importance.On the other hand Trump is a loose cannon, volatile, ignorant and dangerous. He is advised by extreme right wing white supremacists, a sexual predator, and nationalist ideologues. In addition, he has unleashed violent racism and hate .

      • Tuyzentfloot
        August 24, 2016, 11:00 am

        Although Hillary’s neo con connections cause strong anxiety and fear,

        I’d mostly agree but that’s a pretty noncommitted statement. Right now this is very dangerous.

      • RoHa
        August 24, 2016, 7:14 pm

        Interesting comment on Trump from Scott Adams.

        http://blog.dilbert.com/post/149412367306/con-man-or-hitler

        As I’ve said before, my main concern is which candidate is most likely to lead Australia into war with Russia and/or China.

      • eljay
        August 25, 2016, 7:37 am

        || Lillian Rosengarten: I completely disagree … ||

        Fair enough. :-)

        || … Although Hillary’s neo con connections cause strong anxiety and fear, she can still be influenced to make changes. … On the other hand Trump is a loose cannon, volatile, ignorant and dangerous. He is advised by extreme right wing white supremacists, a sexual predator, and nationalist ideologues. … ||

        I could just as easily write this: Although Trump’s extremist connections cause strong anxiety and fear, he can be influenced to make changes. On the other hand, Hillary is a stong-willed, determined and dangerous. She is advised by neo-conservative war-mongers and Zionists whose agendas threaten the safety of America, Americans and the citizens of countries elsewhere in the world.

      • oldgeezer
        August 25, 2016, 1:13 pm

        @eljay and Lillian

        Sadly you are both correct. While I don’t get a vote I don’t see an alternative that is both viable and palatable.

      • RoHa
        August 26, 2016, 12:52 pm

        I’m not convinced that Trump is the racist monster that some people suggest. One point in his favour is that both the power elites and the poncey fashionable elites are against him. Nut I don’t know whether he has the firmness to be a President. Has he whacked as many enemies as Hillary?

        But American politics are depressing, and will remain so until the Americans come to their senses and take me as their King.

        Another interesting comment from Scott Adams.

        http://blog.dilbert.com/post/149460388421/clinton-and-trump-switch-brands

      • Mooser
        August 26, 2016, 1:13 pm

        “I’m not convinced that Trump is the racist monster that some people suggest”

        Well, yesterday Trump abandoned the centerpiece of his campaign, the Mexican Wall and Muslim Deportation(!!!) and praised Obama’s immigration policy, and said Obama was a deporter par excellence. And that he, Trump, would continue Obama’s policy.

        (Of course, this happened on the very day Ann Coulter released her book, saying Trump could do anything in the world except that and she would love him. Made for an interesting book-signing, and release party. She was on a Twitter rant before the day was through.)

      • Mooser
        August 26, 2016, 1:55 pm

        “Americans come to their senses and take me as their King.”

        King only? What we need around this cave is a good Philosopher-King.

      • RoHa
        August 26, 2016, 4:26 pm

        Mooser, I’m already a philosopher.

      • silamcuz
        August 27, 2016, 10:46 am

        Mooser, I’m already a philosopher.

        One who can’t figure out what racism is, and why Trump is a racist? Aren’t philosophers meant to be some sort of cerebral tour-de-force, the thinking class of humanity, the ones who know what others merely feel…hmmmm philosophy sure has changed since the days of Plato, Al-Rumi, Al-Ghazali and the likes.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 12:21 pm

        “Mooser, I’m already a philosopher.”

        Well, in that case, run for King, too! You will be the Philosopher-King at the bar, I will be Chef Rabbi Bar Sh’eesh Kabob, slicing the Novy and schmearing on weekdays and playing with a Hydraulis trio on weekends, and Plato’s Cavern will be the hottest club in the civis.

      • RoHa
        August 27, 2016, 12:38 pm

        Please enlighten me. I’m quite prepared to learn what racism is and what makes Trump racist. Perhaps you can start from here:

        “1Prejudice, discrimination, or antagonism directed against someone of a different race based on the belief that one’s own race is superior…

        1.1The belief that all members of each race possess characteristics, abilities, or qualities specific to that race, especially so as to distinguish it as inferior or superior to another race or races…”

        http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/racism

        For my part, I would question whether “the belief that one’s own race is superior” is a necessary part of the concept, but I’m sure you will take up that issue as you elaborate.

        (I will, however, point out that, even though you might persuade me that Trump is as racist as he is reputed to be, I think a racist, mysogynist, etc. president who does not start wars with Russia and China, and who does not bomb the unmentionable out of black, brown, Muslim, etc. people is preferable to an unracist, feminist, etc. president who is enthusiastic about reducing the world to smoking piles of rubble.)

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 5:27 pm

        “One who can’t figure out what racism is, and why Trump is a racist?”

        It’s called the Socratic method, if I am not mistaken. At Plato’s Cavern Club, where “RoHa” is Philosopher-King, (and Chief Mixologist) we use nothing but.

      • silamcuz
        August 30, 2016, 3:49 am

        Roha,

        Please enlighten me. I’m quite prepared to learn what racism is and what makes Trump racist. Perhaps you can start from here

        First of all, racism is so complex that unless you have lived through it and experienced it first hand, it is impossible for you to fully understand regardless of how many people you speak to or how many articles you read on it. There is simply no substitute to lived experiences when it comes to understanding and developing empathy.

        You need to step relying on the dictionary to understand a concept that is the single most pressing issue affecting tens, possibly hundreds of millions of people in the Western hemisphere, beyond matters like politics, finance, economy, romance, family etc.

        The classical definition of racism about believing someone is inferior due to his skin color is grossly outdated and irrelevant in the present era. We consider that today as a form of prejudice, which can be possessed by anyone of any race. Racism however involve more than just mere beliefs, it requires concrete, measurable actions that aims to reinforce such beliefs in real-life.

        Racism can be covert and overt and rely upon institutional systems of oppression to manifest itself within individuals. Since black, brown and Natives lack such institutional powers, at least relatives to whites, they cannot be racist regardless of how terribly prejudiced they may be. They don’t have the capacity to hurt others through their prejudice in the same manner as white people do.

        But all of that are besides the point. If you don’t understand racism now, you will never understand it and it’s okay. That’s just how life works. However, it is important that you acknowledge that racism exist and always be prepared to listen to those who do understand racism because they have lived their entire lives dealing with it.

        You don’t need to understand racism to know that it’s wrong and unjust and must be eradicated.

        TL:DR – Just watch this video if you can’t be bothered reading what I wrote

      • RoHa
        August 31, 2016, 3:56 pm

        Another damned video. I refuse to waste my time listening to some talking head wurfling on about it when I can read the same information in a matter of seconds. If the ideas are worth knowing, they are worth writing down.

        You stress the difficulty in understanding racism, but I’m sure you don’t mean to imply that I cannot know what racism is, for you tell me that I must acknowledge that it exists. I cannot acknowledge the existence of something if I do not have some idea of what it is.

        However, I gather that you think of racism as the discriminatory practices, rather than just the attitudes. This seems fair enough, and not difficult to understand at all. Nor is it so very different from what I previously thought.

    • Kay24
      August 24, 2016, 9:52 am

      The US can be very selective about which country deserves to be condemned, and sanctioned, for human rights violations. Their favorite nations who scratch their backs gets a huge pass, and usually gets a wink and a nod from our officials, while those refuse to go along with US policies, or even dares stand up to it, becomes the evil empire.

      Case and point: An arrogant occupier, who has occupied for decades, keeps stealing lands and building illegal settlements, steals water, kills unarmed civilians in their homes, shelters, and simply walking by, and abuses children in prisons, who has been spying on us, attacked our naval ship, sold our weapons to China, http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/israel-accused-of-selling-us-secrets-to-china-1510406.html, disrespects the WH, and have killed American citizens at various times, keeps getting our unwavering support.

      Any other nation would have been made into a pariah and sanctioned.

      • eljay
        August 24, 2016, 10:02 am

        || Kay24: The US can be very selective about which country deserves to be condemned, and sanctioned, for human rights violations. … ||
        Israel and the U.S. really do have “shared common values”:
        – they think they’re (morally) superior to the rest of the world;
        – they selectively embrace nations that engage in unjust and immoral behaviour;
        – they selectively condemn nations that engage in unjust and immoral behaviour; and
        – they routinely, deliberately, hypocritically and with impunity engage in unjust and immoral behaviour.

      • Kay24
        August 24, 2016, 11:44 am

        All true. Israel is the mini me America, perhaps that is why it keeps getting away with murder.
        The only difference is the US has not occupied for decades. It attacks and leaves behind bases in many countries.

      • eljay
        August 24, 2016, 11:58 am

        || Kay24: All true. Israel is the mini me America, perhaps that is why it keeps getting away with murder. … ||

        Birds of a hateful and immoral feather…

        || … The only difference is the US has not occupied for decades. It attacks and leaves behind bases in many countries. ||

        While the U.S. hasn’t occupied countries in decades, it has (to name just a few evils):
        – invaded or supported the invasion of sovereign nations;
        – overthrown or supported the overthrow of governments;
        – installed compliant regimes; and
        – enabled and engaged in torture.

      • Kay24
        August 24, 2016, 7:18 pm

        I agree Eljay, the US has done, and keeps doing, so many unacceptable things that I still learn of even today. We have interfered in other nations, toppled governments, turned opposition groups into “rebels”, armed and trained groups that became “terrorists” that ultimately threatened us, decides who must be leader of some nation, and also decide we should take “democracy” over there, and our bombs have killed thousands. It should make us hang our head in shame.

        We are also complicit in all Israel’s crimes because we continue to send this wealthy nation aid and weapons.

  3. Marnie
    August 24, 2016, 9:05 am

    “And Clinton had very little to say against the Bahrain repression of nonviolent protesters.” –

    Could be this is the template for repression of nonviolent protesters in the u.s. after she or trump steal the white house, er, um, are elected.

  4. Kay24
    August 24, 2016, 9:18 am

    So our sorry choice for President is either a loony bigot and liar, who knows diddly squat about running a country versus a corrupt, dishonest woman, who does know how to run a country, but will most probably abuse her powers to resort to shady dealings, and will sleep with the devil to achieve her objectives.

    It seems some passionate people are already protesting her wealthy campaign donor, who is known for being an Israel firster over his own country, which can be deemed unpatriotic by some.
    Good luck to them.

    http://www.alternet.org/grayzone-project/protests-target-clinton-fundraiser-hollywood-home-pro-israel-mega-donor

  5. nubwaxer
    August 24, 2016, 11:31 am

    correction: USA good friend . . .
    bahrain is a solid ally in a strategic location. we need them, with or without the clintons. our government accomodates their wishes to a great extent. is the author here trying to alienate them or is this merely more factuendo, a presentation based on presumed but not evidence based facts? isn’t this simply another hit piece?
    the clinton foundation is 5 star rated as a charity distributing 89% of its donations to real charity work.
    what’s donald j. contribute to any real charities in real money?

  6. David Nelson
    August 24, 2016, 12:08 pm

    I am not one to stick up for Clinton, but I think there is more to the story here. I’d say that Saud crossed that bridge due to direct orders from the US government, not on appeal by Bahrain to the GCC. Those orders would have stemmed from concerns over the future of the US Fifth fleet in Bahrain. Bahrain/Fifth fleet is nexus of US imperialism in the region, crucial for its hegemonic goals there.

  7. Citizen
    August 25, 2016, 1:36 am

    Bahraini Authorities Continue Campaign Against Sheikh Isa Qassim and Shia Religious Leaders http://birdbh.org/2016/08/bahraini-authorities-continue-campaign-against-sheikh-isa-qassim-and-shia-religious-leaders/ via @BirdBahrain_

  8. Citizen
    August 25, 2016, 1:56 am

    Some info on the Bahrain in Hillary’s emails: http://forums.theozone.net/offtopic/messages/355155.html

  9. silamcuz
    August 27, 2016, 11:24 am

    Bahrain quashed Arab spring without protest from Sec’y Clinton

    Firstly, I note the use of extremely emotive language in the title that I am certain was deliberate by Phil. Evil Bahrain quashing Arab Spring protests like a problem child stomping on bugs and little animals for shit and giggles. Except that they didn’t do anything close to that nature and merely contained protesters threatening to overthrow the government. Once contained, most protesters were handled using completely civic means.

    But being the hypocrite Phil is, he considers this as protests being “quashed” whatever that means, that ought to be protested by Madam Hillary. But when Assad is bombing ten of thousands civilians to smithereens along with everything within a set radius of them for protesting against the regime, Phil believes Hillary should leave Assad alone.

    Now onto the next bit of the article. He mockingly calls Bahrain as Madam Hillary’s good friend because they happen to donate to her charitable organisation in an obvious attempt of tarnishing her reputation.

    So if through the measure of donating one become good friends of Madam Hillary, then Qatar should equally be noted as a good friend. But noting that Qatar is also a generous friend of Hillary would not produce a reaction Phil is looking for, since Qatar has been a loyal ally of Palestine for decades and have been instrumental in the development and success of the BDS movement in addition to being an all-around pleasant and respectable little nation.

    Face it Phil, Madam Hillary win or lose the election, will never go down in history as the person you are desperately working to cast her as. I along with millions around the world will always remember her for as a person of the highest calibre, a leader far too competent, a womyn of great strength and even greater compassion and love for justice. You on the other hand, man I can’t even describe the nausea within me thinking I once admired you.

    • Mooser
      August 27, 2016, 12:01 pm

      “I along with millions around the world will always remember her for as a person of the highest calibre, a leader far too competent, a womyn of great strength and even greater compassion and love for justice.”

      Gee, since we’re getting sentimental, I will always remember her as a woman who always, in the end deferred to what she thought were powerful men, (Bush and Cheney)and voted for the War on Iraq.

      ” You on the other hand, man I can’t even describe the nausea within me thinking I once admired you.”

      In that case, you will have to keep on supplying Mondo (that is Phil Weiss) with a steady stream of “hits”, “UPVs” and “sessions” in between trips to ‘worship the Porcelain God’, or just keep a bucket handy.

      • silamcuz
        August 27, 2016, 1:13 pm

        I’m sorry but I never meant to say I hated engaging in the conversations in Mondoweiss. On the contrary, I enjoy reading the type of editorials and articles that are typically published here and commenting on them. As such, I would only be glad to know if my comments serve to benefit the site in some form.

        However, as a person dedicated to justice, I get too riled up easily upon reading blatantly unjust writings, regardless who these are written by. I just can’t stand injustice and Phil, as decent as a man he tries to be, do slip into a lousy reporter from time to time, in my view at least.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 4:51 pm

        “I’m sorry but I never meant to say I hated engaging in the conversations in Mondoweiss.”

        Then you really should give it a try.

        BTW, have you managed to get over your nausea yet?

      • Annie Robbins
        August 27, 2016, 5:52 pm

        like a problem child stomping on bugs and little animals for shit and giggles …. merely contained protesters threatening to overthrow the government

        “Massacre in the Middle East: Horrific video captures Bahrain troops gunning down peaceful protesters in the street”

        Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1358570/Middle-East-massacre-Video-captures-Bahrain-troops-gunning-protesters.html#ixzz4IZUQ1zze

        Bahrain Bloody Thursday– https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bahrain_Bloody_Thursday

      • silamcuz
        August 30, 2016, 11:00 am

        Annie,

        “Massacre in the Middle East: Horrific video captures Bahrain troops gunning down peaceful protesters in the street”

        Read more: link to dailymail.co.uk

        Bahrain Bloody Thursday– link to en.wikipedia.org

        Wiki says a shocking total of 4 people died during the event known as Bahrain Bloody Thursday, after 10000 people decided to participate in a not so peaceful protest.

        If 4 people dying after protesting to topple the state calls for US intervention, what does 50,000 people dead civilian in Syria require of us? A nuclear-powered annihilation of the entire Syrian government?

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2016, 11:49 am

        shorter sila: i can whitewash a gov killing 4 and wounding 300 in a pre dawn raid of sleeping people as ‘merely containing protesters’. impressive/not.

        you’re the guy who wrote “I would suggest some moderation and reservation against our rather reckless opposition towards the Gulf Monarchies, and possibly even Saudi Arabia.”

      • silamcuz
        August 30, 2016, 12:24 pm

        shorter sila: i can whitewash a gov killing 4 and wounding 300 in a pre dawn raid of sleeping people as ‘merely containing protesters’. impressive/not.

        you’re the guy who wrote “I would suggest some moderation and reservation against our rather reckless opposition towards the Gulf Monarchies, and possibly even Saudi Arabia.

        I’m not saying the 4 deaths are justified or otherwise. I am in no position to judge how the entire tragedy developed and why it ended up the way it did, with 4 people unfortunately dying.

        All I am asking if why is Hillary obligated to intervene in what essentially a foreign government maintaining its authority, while at the same time she is criticized for trying to stop another foreign government practically engaging in forced depopulation?

        Why not advocate for both, or neither? Why call for one intervention but oppose the other?

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2016, 1:03 pm

        I am in no position to judge

        yet you’re always judging:

        What a disgusting display of yellow journalism.

        a constant nag and lecture. why are you back here 3 days later on this old thread?

      • silamcuz
        August 30, 2016, 1:11 pm

        Right, so you have decided to abandon any reasoned conversation on the topic and choose to engage in ad hominem attacks instead.

        How typical.

      • Annie Robbins
        August 30, 2016, 1:42 pm

        i don’t consider your hasbara and diversions “reasoned conversation” therefore i’ve abandoned nothing but another opportunity to perpetuate your continued propping up of clinton, the serial liar and war monger.

        choose to engage in ad hominem attacks instead.

        coming from sila, the queen of ad hominems, that’s quite a compliment.

    • justicewillprevail
      August 27, 2016, 4:51 pm

      Are you a Clinton staffer, or on drugs? Who on earth has that absurdly hyperbolic view of her, outside of some cult of acolytes? So now you are a defender of Gulf oligarchs and Hillary at the same time claiming you care about justice and human rights? Nobody in their right mind could make that equation. i can’t take you seriously, this is ridiculous. Your are just taking the mickey. That is your ‘benefit’ to this site.

      • Mooser
        August 27, 2016, 7:18 pm

        ” i can’t take you seriously, this is ridiculous.”

        “justicewillprevail”, I know what you mean.
        Here’s my personal favorite from his oeuvre.
        “Silamcuz” is activating hard here, for the women of Pakistan:

        “Last time I checked, women in Pakistan or Bangladesh are not being economically forced to engage in degrading and dehumanising sex work in the same scale American women are. There are also sophisticated societal mechanisms that empowers women politically, financially and politically in Pakistan that is completely foreign to American women.” “Silamcuz” http://mondoweiss.net/profile/silamcuz/?keyword=Pakistan#sthash.nx6B8syk.dpuf

        A real activator, that one.

  10. Mooser
    August 27, 2016, 4:36 pm

    “However, as a person dedicated to justice…”

    No, as you have made perfectly clear, and doubled down on, more than once (“I stand by my comments”) you are dedicated to violence, and will correct Phil with a “good old fashioned slap”!

    So slap away, “Simmy”! As you say, you “know of no better way…”

    But please, don’t let me stop you from explaining why Ms. Clinton’s vote for the War on Iraq was of the greatest benefit to POC all over the world. I’m sure you can. After all, wasn’t that some of that good old violence which stops “injustice”?

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