Iftar on the rubble

Israel/Palestine
on 50 Comments

My father was a social worker on Los Angeles’ skid row for decades. He felt deeply about the humanity of homeless people, and he did what he could to help each person to have a better life. Herb Lester, my father, saw homelessness as a humanitarian disaster; he saw it as the failure of governments to ensure the well-being of their people. And he felt a responsibility to act.

If my father were still living, he would have been appalled to hear about the demolition of Ashraf and Islam Fawaqa’s home in the Sur Baher neighborhood of Jerusalem. He would have been furious that Israel intentionally and systematically makes Palestinian families homeless.

I was thinking about my father on June 13 at the “Iftar on the Rubble,” which I organized with my friends at the site of Ashraf and Islam’s demolished home.

We planned the Iftar to show solidarity with Ashraf and Islam, and the tens of thousands of Palestinian families whose homes have been demolished, partially demolished, or sealed, and who live every day under the imminent threat of demolitions by the Israel authorities. I felt compelled not only by the humanitarian instincts I inherited from my father (and mother), but also by my profound disappointment in the United Nations coordinated humanitarian response, a prominent feature of the Jerusalem landscape, but not, in my point of view, an effective one.

Home demolition is not merely an Israeli administrative policy, as it is often presented in the western media. Home demolition is part of Israel’s political strategy to expel Palestinians from any place they want control, often through the establishment of Jewish settlements.

Given the magnitude of the impact of demolitions on Palestinians, I have long felt that the humanitarian sector should do more to fulfill its “protection” mandate. Protection involves reducing vulnerability, and for me, this means humanitarians should provide proactive, robust help to strengthen at-risk communities. Even after demolition, the response of humanitarian organizations is inadequate, bureaucratic, and according to some families, demeaning.

My friends and I felt that the least we could do to show these families–families who are on the frontline of the continuing Nakba–that they have real allies, that they are not alone.

On the night of the Iftar on the Rubble, local and international media were in attendance as Ashraf and Islam Fawaqa talked about the demolition of their home on May 4 and how they now live in limbo on the rubble of the demolition site.

Islam Fawaqa holds her daughter Aya, in front of rubble that remains after the Israeli authorities demolished her home in the Sur Baher neighborhood of East Jerusalem, June 13, 2017. (Photo: Nora Lester Murad)

Munir Nusseibeh of the Al Quds Community Action Center, one of Jerusalem’s most prominent lawyers, spoke about how demolitions are increasing and the danger demolition poses to the ability of Palestinians to stay in Jerusalem. Nurredin Amro, whose home was demolished on March 15, talked about his experience. His wife, Nabiha, spoke about the terrible psychological impact the demolition had on their children.

Powerful as it was to hear these families talk about their experiences, I think my father would have agreed that the real accomplishment was the Iftar itself. Muslims break the Ramadan fast at the sunset call to prayer, and that’s when the nearly 75 attendees pulled out the dishes they brought and set them out on long tables the Fawaqas had rented for the occasion. There were grape leaves stuffed by the Domari of Jerusalem, home baked cookies, whole meals contributed by the zakat society, and roasted chicken donated by Jerusalem Hotel and Café La Vie, dried figs and juice and more donated by Tanour Market and Abu Zahra Market. People from different walks of life, Palestinians and international solidarity activists, sat elbow to elbow and ate.

The sun went down and the temperature dropped, but people did not rush to leave. They stayed and talked and talked and talked. In the dim spotlight Ashraf rigged, an unusual mix of human beings enjoyed the cool Jerusalem breeze together on the rubble of the Fawaqa family home.

Fawaqa family sits inside of a tent erected out front of their demolished home in the Sur Baher neighborhood of East Jerusalem. (Photo: Iftar on the Rubble)

I felt my father’s presence with us that night in Sur Baher, Jerusalem. Like me, he would have been heartened by this real humanitarianism. It wasn’t programmed. It wasn’t funded. And it wasn’t part of anyone’s three-year plan. It was just people caring for people. And it felt hopeful.

About Nora Lester Murad

Nora Lester Murad, PhD, is an activist and writer living in Jerusalem, Palestine. She co-founded Dalia Association, Palestine's community foundation, and Aid Watch Palestine, a demand driven accountability initiative working in Gaza. She has published articles in The Guardian, Aljazeera, OpenDemocracy, Al-Adab, and has done public speaking all over the world on the topics of international aid, local philanthropy, and accountability to communities. She blogs at www.noralestermurad.com and can be reached at @NoraInPalestine.

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50 Responses

  1. JosephA
    June 20, 2017, 10:33 pm

    Dear Nora, thank you for sharing your story and bearing witness to this tragedy and the glimmer of hope that remains in humanity. That people could break bread on the rubble of a home immorally demolished in a gesture of support for the victims of the demolished home is something special.

  2. Kay24
    June 20, 2017, 10:44 pm

    Meanwhile the squatters not so far away, enjoy living on stolen lands, plenty of water, electricity, and are well taken care of by the very same evil people, who caused the pain and suffering of these poor Palestinians. I have always said that the Palestinians are resilient people, and this article proves it.

    • Misterioso
      June 21, 2017, 5:50 pm

      Palestinians are indeed “resilient.” While conquerors and occupiers have come and gone, they and their ancestors have lived continuously between the River and the Sea for about 9,000 years.

      • Emet
        June 23, 2017, 7:48 am

        In fact the Loch Ness monster teamed up with the Palestinians 8999 years ago, soon after the first Palestinian grew wings and hair of real gold. And that all happened before lunch. What, you don’t believe me?

      • zaid
        June 23, 2017, 11:29 am

        Actually more than 9000 year.

        Recent genetic samples from bones found in Palestine dating to the Epipaleolithic ( 20000-10500 BC) showed remarkable resemblance to modern day Palestinians.

        “The non-Levantine origin of AJs is further supported by an ancient DNA analysis of six Natufians and a Levantine Neolithic (Lazaridis et al., 2016), some of the most likely Judaean progenitors (Finkelstein and Silberman, 2002; Frendo, 2004). In a principle component analysis (PCA), the ancient Levantines clustered predominantly with modern-day Palestinians and Bedouins and marginally overlapped with Arabian Jews, whereas AJs clustered away from Levantine individuals and adjacent to Neolithic Anatolians and Late Neolithic and Bronze Age Europeans.”

        http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fgene.2017.00087/full

        AJ is Ashkenazi Jews

      • Annie Robbins
        June 23, 2017, 12:23 pm

        really interesting synthesis on that link zaid.

      • Talkback
        June 23, 2017, 2:24 pm

        Emet: “In fact the Loch Ness monster teamed up with the Palestinians 8999 years ago, soon after the first Palestinian grew wings and hair of real gold. And that all happened before lunch. What, you don’t believe me?”

        You seem to talk alot with burning bushes. You should write verything down and claim that these words come from God. I’m sure you find someone who buys your con.

      • Emet
        June 24, 2017, 4:56 am

        zaid, you are placing your Palestinian Arab brothers on thin ice here. We have been saying all along that a large majority of Palestinians now in Israel came from neighboring areas. DNA matching will confirm this. We all call for these Arabs to go home.

      • RoHa
        June 24, 2017, 10:47 am

        Emet, the majority of Arabs living in Israel were born there. They are not from outside the area.

      • Mooser
        June 24, 2017, 11:34 am

        “that a large majority of Palestinians now in Israel came from neighboring areas. DNA matching will confirm this. We all call for these Arabs to go home”

        Of course, “DNA tests” on Jews in Israel will show Zionists are all descended directly from King David, like me!

        (Gosh darn it, every goddam English-language Zionist site on the web should send Mondo a check, or at least a thank-you note. They ought to show some gratitude for all the moderation, mortification and banning Mondo saves them. )

      • zaid
        June 24, 2017, 12:02 pm

        Emet

        Palestine is part of the Levant , and The Ancient DNA samples used in the study was from a cave in North Palestine.

        Please Dont hide your disappointment Emet and face the reality , the study i linked to is the 4th one this year and all are saying the same thing, Modern Palestinians are indigenous to Palestine and Jews are not.

        Now pack your bags and go back to your homeland in Europe and Anatolia. I don’t want you near my historic homeland.

      • Talkback
        June 24, 2017, 12:11 pm

        Emet: “zaid, you are placing your Palestinian Arab brothers on thin ice here.”

        By referring to an article that mentions that Ashkenazi Jews’ origin is NON-Levantine?

        Emet: We have been saying all along that a large majority of Palestinians now in Israel came from neighboring areas. DNA matching will confirm this. We all call for these Arabs to go home.”

        Yep. That’s the truth about the Zionism. A Nazi like genetics and soil approach based on the myth of a Jewish exile and the ludicrous claim of a “return”. According to the article you would need to sent at least all Ashkenazi Jews home, too. And who knows how much more because of Judaism’s nearly 1000 years of proselytism. It’s quite funny that you of all people call Abbas “Adolf”.

        But compare your approach to the civilized rest of the world whose only legal relevant question would be: Who was a legal citizen of Palestine in 1948 and thefore had the right to self determination in Palestine and to decide Palestine’s goverment and future?

        According to the numbers of the mandatory’s “Village Statistics” of 1945 most most of the Jews who entered Palestine had not acquired citizenship. Should we all call for these illegal immigrants to go home, too?

      • RoHa
        June 24, 2017, 7:40 pm

        DNA tests, Mooser? I thought every Jew had a complete, certified, family record showing every generation in direct descent from Abraham, and with no hanky-panky in the woodshed.

      • Misterioso
        June 25, 2017, 1:12 pm

        @Emet

        “We have been saying all along that a large majority of Palestinians now in Israel came from neighboring areas.”

        Sigh.

        It seems like many others, you have been duped by Joan Peters’ long since debunked mountain of mendacity, “From Time Immemorial…”

        To wit:

        Dr. Porath, one of Israel’s leading demographic historians, called Peters’ book a “forgery… [that] was almost universally dismissed [in Israel] as sheer rubbish except maybe as a propaganda weapon.”(New York Times, Nov.28, 1985)

        Rabbi Arthur Herzberg, vice-president of the World Jewish Congress, agreed: “I think that she’s cooked the statistics…. The scholarship is phony and tendentious. I do not believe that she has read the Arabic sources that she quotes.”(ibid)

        To again quote Professor Porath: “The precise demographic history of modern Palestine cannot be summed up briefly, but its main features are clear enough and they are very different from the fanciful description Mrs. Peters gives…. [S]he has apparently searched through documents for any statement to the effect that Arabs entered Palestine. But even if we put together all the cases she cites, one cannot escape the conclusion that most of the growth of the Palestinian Arab community resulted from a process of natural increase.” (“Mrs. Peters’ Palestine” New York Review of Books, 16 January 1986.)

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2017, 10:34 am

        “I thought every Jew had a complete, certified, family record showing every generation in direct descent from Abraham, and with no hanky-panky in the woodshed.”

        Well, my family used to have one, but between the expulsions, the genocides, immigration, and wars, it got lost somewhere.

      • gamal
        June 26, 2017, 12:19 pm

        “that a large majority of Palestinians now in Israel came from neighboring areas”

        rather than neighbouring and distant continents like you, poor Jon s isn’t here to tell you that the well known name Maqdisi, which now we must write Muqadassi, means from Jerusalem, there aretwo famous historians an Al-Maqdisi and A2-Maqdisi, so as the Arabs came from neighbouring areas we’ve been thru this

        so came from neighbouring area like :

        Ibrahim, Musa, Ayyub who was from Oz but some insist from Dhofar, to mention just a few.

        when was Palestine ever empty, ever.

        and also whats this Israelite, Hebrew, Jew nonsense you can’t be all three, nor can there be any continuity between them because thats a contradiction in sperms.

      • RoHa
        June 27, 2017, 4:03 am

        That’s a shame, Mooser. But if you assure me that you are, indeed, a direct descendant of Abraham, I’m happy to take your word for it. I know I can trust you.

      • Mooser
        June 27, 2017, 11:43 am

        “But if you assure me that you are, indeed, a direct descendant of Abraham,”

        A descendant of many Abrahams! There were Abrahams all over the place in my family!

  3. Citizen
    June 21, 2017, 12:20 am

    Einstein would have approved of such spontaneous real humanism, humanitarianism.

    • Misterioso
      June 21, 2017, 4:32 pm

      Indeed!!

      For the record:

      In 1929, Einstein replied as follows to his friend Chaim Weizmann (then president of the British Zionist Federation) who had written to him about the Jewish Zionist question: “Should we be unable to find a way to honest cooperation and honest pacts with the Arabs, then we have learned absolutely nothing during our 2,000 years of suffering and deserve all that will come to us,” he wrote, adding, “should the Jews not learn to live in peace with the Arabs, the struggle against them will follow them for decades in the future.” (“When Albert Einstein was a Holy Land Ladies’ Man,” Haaretz, February 3, 2015, by Gili Izkovitch)

      In 1939 he prophetically wrote: “There could be no greater calamity than a permanent discord between us and the Arab people…. We must strive for a just and lasting compromise with the Arab people…. Let us recall that in former times no people lived in greater friendship with us than the ancestors of these Arabs.”

      It is unfortunate that the Truman administration ignored the wisdom expressed by Einstein in his testimony before the Anglo-American Committee of Inquiry in January 1946. When asked whether refugee settlement in Palestine demanded a Jewish state, he replied: “The State idea is not according to my heart. I cannot understand why it is needed. It is connected with narrow-mindedness and economic obstacles. I believe it is bad. I have always been against it.”

      In his Out of My Later Years, Einstein reiterated his views on partition, which was then reality: “I should much rather see reasonable agreement with the Arabs on the basis of living together in peace than the creation of a Jewish state. Apart from the practical consideration, my awareness of the essential nature of Judaism resists the idea of a Jewish state with borders, an army, and a measure of temporal power no matter how modest. I am afraid of the inner damage Judaism will sustain – especially from the development of a narrow nationalism within our own ranks, against which we have already to fight strongly, even without a Jewish state.” (Albert Einstein, Out of My Later Years, Citadel Press, Secaucus, New Jersey, 1956; p. 263)

      .

  4. Annie Robbins
    June 22, 2017, 11:59 am

    that video of the demolition of their home is so excruciatingly horrifying i had to turn it off. what sadism is this!

    • zaid
      June 25, 2017, 12:03 pm

      “How come this Arab people you call Palestinians, never produced any literature highlighting and documenting their lives and history?”

      Fake claim , I can send links to book writen about Palestine and Palestinians over a thousand year ago.

      “The first recorded mention of Jerusalem was in Hebrew.”

      Fake Claim e, the mention you are talking about were deemed a forgery.

      “The second, the third and the 400th recorded reference to Jerusalem are from the Jewish perspective. ”

      Fake Claim.

      “What, nothing from the Palestinians until recent history?”

      Fake claim.

      This woman/man is a spammer and a troll.

      • Misterioso
        June 25, 2017, 1:32 pm

        And he/she spews forth his/her nonsense alongside fatbastard.

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2017, 10:53 am

        “This woman/man is a spammer and a troll.”

        Exactly. That’s why they are here instead of at a Zionist site!

  5. Emet
    June 22, 2017, 4:39 pm

    Earliest mention of the word Jerusalem…

    http://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Ancient-papyrus-scroll-found-with-earliest-Hebrew-mention-of-Jerusalem-470898

    As Arabs reject the importance of Jerusalem to Jews, which is a disgusting distortion of the truth, hypocrites like Nora should rather use the word Al-Quds to describe where she lives. Every time she uses the word Jerusalem she is in fact giving indirect support to Jewish claims. Thanks Nora.

    • Talkback
      June 22, 2017, 9:13 pm

      The article is just about the earliest mention of the word in extra biblicial HEBREW writings. That doesn’t mean that the earliest mention of the word was in Hebrew. And the fact that most people of the world call it Jerusalem doesn’t support any claim.

      • Emet
        June 23, 2017, 4:09 am

        Hebrew = Jews. I know this is hard for you to swallow. But tough. You and your fanatical friends are not going to change the actual history of the city. The Palestinians have zero historical claims to the city. They have never ruled over the city or any part of it, and I am talking about in all of recorded history. And before recorded history, there was no Islam and no Arab people called Palestinians. Ramallah is a great city, so I’m told. Capital of Palestine will be Ramallah.
        And with the focus on Jerusalem and it’s history, most people in the world who care about what is really going on and who are ignorant of the history, will soon learn instead of eating up the propaganda being fed to them by you, Abu Adolf Mazen and friends.

      • Annie Robbins
        June 23, 2017, 11:13 am

        there’s a character in this latuff cartoon that reminds me of emet. https://twitter.com/anniefofani/status/877745359992127489

      • Mooser
        June 23, 2017, 11:41 am

        “there’s a character in this latuff cartoon that reminds me of emet.”

        Only one? I see two “Emetics”.

      • Talkback
        June 23, 2017, 2:11 pm

        Emet: “Hebrew = Jews. I know this is hard for you to swallow. But tough.”

        It is pretty hard for me and hard to swallow that you still fail to understand that the article is about the earliest time a Hebrew/Jewish writing mentions Jerusalem and that doesn’t mean that it was the very first time that it was mentioned at all. Your stupidity actually hurts.

        Emet: “You and your fanatical friends are not going to change the actual history of the city.”

        The city is older than Hebrew/Jewish writings you shmock.

        Emet: “The Palestinians have zero historical claims to the city.”

        A population of a country has a natural claim to its territory, whether Zionist settlers expell them or not.

        Emet: “They have never ruled over the city or any part of it, and I am talking about in all of recorded history.”

        Actually the Goverment of mandated Palestine ruled over the city on behalf of the citizens of Palestine. You know, the LEGAL residents and citizens of Palestine and not some foreign settlers. Nevertheless being a true colonialist you have to ignore that in post colonial times it is completey irrelevant if the population of the country have allready been allowed to rule over their country or a held under mandate or occupation They still are the souvereign of this country.

        Emet: “And before recorded history, there was no Islam and no Arab people called Palestinians.”

        Of course not. The people that are called today “Palestinians” existed before the Arab/Muslim and even the first Jewish conquest. So what?

        Emet: “Capital of Palestine will be Ramallah.”

        Do you have other fascist fantasies which you would like to impose upon other people?

        Emet: “And with the focus on Jerusalem and it’s history, most people in the world who care about what is really going on and who are ignorant of the history, will soon learn instead of eating up the propaganda being fed to them by you, Abu Adolf Mazen and friends.”

        You wouldn’t be the first Zionist i all of recorded history whose plank in the eye has started to penetrate his brain.

      • MHughes976
        June 23, 2017, 4:16 pm

        The earliest mention of Jerusalem is considered to be in the Egyptian Exexration Texts of maybe 1750 BCE, followed by a mention in the Amarna texts four centuries later. The Bible – not everyone believes this – tells us that in those early days it was a centre, long before it was Jewish, of the worship of God Most High. Zionist positions are based on a mixture, to me confusing, of claims based on biological and cultural continuity. Either way the Palestinians have a claim: they can hardly not have a significant degree of bio continuity with the ancient population and their religions, Islam and Christianity, are forms of worship of God MH.
        Not that it makes any shred of sense to exclude people from their homes or disfranchise or humiliate them because of their ancestral genetics or because of the religion of their ancestors at the dawn of recorded time.

      • Mooser
        June 24, 2017, 12:11 pm

        .” Zionist positions are based on a mixture, to me confusing, of claims based on biological and cultural continuity”

        Don’t waste your time pondering that BS.

      • Emet
        June 25, 2017, 10:40 am

        How come this Arab people you call Palestinians, never produced any literature highlighting and documenting their lives and history? Why is that do you think?

        Talkback: The first recorded mention of Jerusalem was in Hebrew. The second, the third and the 400th recorded reference to Jerusalem are from the Jewish perspective. What, nothing from the Palestinians until recent history?

      • YoniFalic
        June 25, 2017, 12:38 pm

        Why is Emet allowed to use the phrase Abu Adolf Mazen and thus to equate the victims of white racist genocidal European settler colonist invaders with German Nazis?

        As a matter of modern critical comparative history, Netanyahu is far more like Adolf Hitler while one might see similarities between Abbas and Vidkun Quisling — I think Abbas probably comes closer to Maréchal Pétain.

      • gamal
        June 25, 2017, 8:48 pm

        “How come this Arab people you call Palestinians, never produced any literature highlighting and documenting their lives and history?”

        how embarrassing, i mean popular texts are available in English say Amin Maalouf, here the notes will help you, there a lot of fadhail literature but it’s voluminous, why not try Amnon Cohens “Jewish Life Under Islam”, or you could just let ignorance be your shield and idiocy your armour.

        Shafi was from Gaza, but we buried him in the Mukattam.

      • RoHa
        June 25, 2017, 10:26 pm

        “you could just let ignorance be your shield and idiocy your armour”

        That seems to be the popular choice everywhere.

      • YoniFalic
        June 26, 2017, 8:36 am

        Emet asks:

        How come this Arab people you call Palestinians, never produced any literature highlighting and documenting their lives and history? Why is that do you think?

        Palestinians unlike Emet and me descend from Greco-Roman Judeans, who created the canonical Hebrew Bible, the Jerusalem Talmud, and the literary works (in Hebrew, Aramaic, and Koine Greek) of Greco-Roman Palestine.

        At that time the pagan Slavic and Turkic ancestors of Emet and me were illiterate and not producing any literary works at all. The lack of an early literate culture makes the later literary and intellectual achievement of E European Slavo-Turks that much more impressive. After E European Slavo-Turks became Rabbinic Jews, they became one of the founding peoples of Europe — probably the key founding people that made modern Europe possible.

        It can only be considered a form of self-hatred that Emet refuses to embrace the true history of “Jewish” Slavo-Turks while he tries to steal the history and legacy of Palestinians as he supports the theft of Palestine from the natives and the vicious genocide that racist Slavo-Turks have been orchestrating and committing against Palestinians since 1947.

        I have addressed this issue previously in From ‘Avalon’ to Madoff: What ‘The Wizard of Lies’ reveals about contemporary American Jewish identity.

      • Talkback
        June 26, 2017, 10:37 am

        Emet: “How come this Arab people you call Palestinians, .never produced any literature highlighting and documenting their lives and history? Why is that do you think? The second, the third and the 400th recorded reference to Jerusalem are from the Jewish perspective. What, nothing from the Palestinians until recent history?”

        Sheqer, you obviously don’t know anything about the country Zionist settlers took by war, terorism, massacres and expulsion. Or about its literature. Or that Muslims calls the city “Al-Quds”. It would be different if you (or your ascendants) were natives of Palestine before 1948 and not foreign settlers from a different continent. Then you would also have been a citizen of Palestine or a so called Palestinian., because this is the legal term for the constitutive people of Palestine since its nationality law was enacted in 1925. Unlike the term “Jews” which isn’t even a nation/citizenship and will never be. So if you talk about “this Arab people you call Palestinians” does that include Arab Jewish (Mizrahim) natives of Palestine or not?

        Your “Jewish perspective” – let’s call it Zionist brainwash – doesn’t seem to allow you to acknowledge ANY literature or history not written in Hebrew. I allready mentioned twice that your linked article is about the earliest HEBREW/JEWISH mention of Jerusalem but that this doesn’t mean that this was the earliest mention of Jerusalem in recorded history (whether the scroll is authentic or a fake as the “exile/diaspora” hoax which can’t be proven by Zionist “academics”). Wikipedia:

        “One of the oldest cities in the world, Jerusalem was named as “Urusalima” on ancient Mesopotamian cuneiform tablets, probably meaning “City of Shalem” after a Canaanite deity, during the early Canaanite period (approximately 2400 BCE).”

      • Mooser
        June 26, 2017, 11:00 am

        “Why is Emet allowed to use the phrase Abu Adolf Mazen and thus to equate the victims of white racist genocidal European settler colonist invaders with German Nazis?”

        You don’t know? It’s a pretty simple technique: Say bigoted things about others, and if anybody tries to give it back to you, start screaming “anti-Semitism”.

      • Keith
        July 3, 2017, 2:14 pm

        YONI FALIC- “It can only be considered a form of self-hatred that Emet refuses to embrace the true history of “Jewish” Slavo-Turks…..”

        Not self-hatred, Yoni, rather fealty to Zionist dogma. How else to justify the very concept of eternal and irrational Gentile anti-Semitism which underpins and Justifies modern Zionism if not to substitute myth-history for real history? The notion of Jews as an integral part of feudal society with a specialized role, having considerable agency to shape society for better or worse, doesn’t fit well with the notion of helplessness and eternal victimhood. But the notion of 2000 years of constant victimhood and the antipathy to Gentiles which that engenders suits the Zionist agenda, hence, real history is to be avoided and/or denied.

    • zaid
      June 25, 2017, 11:56 am

      Emet,

      “Earliest mention of the word Jerusalem…”

      The ancient papyrus you mentioned was ruled to be a fake one.

      http://www.haaretz.com/jewish/archaeology/.premium-1.749603

      http://www.timesofisrael.com/archaeologists-question-oldest-hebrew-mention-of-jerusalem/

      Zionsits are known with forgery of Archeological artifacts.

    • Misterioso
      June 25, 2017, 1:17 pm

      @Emet

      Reality:

      The Jebusite/Canaanites, ancestors of today’s Palestinians, founded Jerusalem around 3000 BCE. Originally known as Jebus, the first recorded reference to it as “Rushalimum” (or “Urussalim”) appears in Egyptian Execration Texts of the nineteenth century BCE, nearly 800 years before it is alleged King David was born.

      BTW, thus far, no real archaeological evidence, or more importantly, writings of contemporaneous civilizations have been discovered that prove that Solomon or David actually existed. To quote Jewish Israeli writer/columnist, Uri Avnery: “[David and Solomon’s] existence is disproved, inter alia, by their total absence from the voluminous correspondence of Egyptian rulers and spies in the Land of Canaan.” (“A Curious National Home,” by Uri Avnery, May 13/17 –
      http://zope.gush-shalom.org/home/en/channels/avnery/1494589093/)

  6. Ossinev
    June 23, 2017, 9:10 am

    @Emet

    “I am talking about in all of recorded history” Ah you mean the bit about seas being parted and animals two by two arks and the like. I must go through the Chronicles of Narnia again there has just got to be some “recorded history about the Jews and Jerusalem in there. There wasn`t anything in the Wizard of Oz as far as I can tell but with your expertise in “recorded history” I expect you would be able to find something.

    Happy ancient homeland hunting.

    • Emet
      June 25, 2017, 10:27 am

      If you say the same thing to your Muslim friends about the Koran, then your life will be in real danger. You don’t which makes you a simple hypocrite.
      So carry on making up stories about the Palestinians. You know, if you say it enough times, then some ignoramus will start to believe you.

      • YoniFalic
        June 25, 2017, 12:27 pm

        Muslims don’t depend on miracles from the text of the Quran. They consider the text of the Quran to be miraculous. The Hebrew Bible is much closer to the Chronicles of Narnia than the Hebrew Bible which contains mythic nonsense reworked during the Persian imperial period.

      • YoniFalic
        June 25, 2017, 1:22 pm

        I meant the following.

        Muslims don’t depend on miracles from the text of the Quran. They consider the text of the Quran to be miraculous. The Hebrew Bible is quite close to the Chronicles of Narnia. The Chronicles of Narnia contains mythic material reworked by CS Lewis. The Hebrew Bible contains mythic nonsense reworked during the Persian imperial period.

  7. Misterioso
    June 25, 2017, 1:25 pm

    @Emet

    The Palestinians have zero historical claims to the city.”

    Really?

    Reality, 1947.

    The total population of West Jerusalem (the New City) and East Jerusalem (the Old City) and their environs was about 200,000 with a slight Arab majority. (Professor Walid Khalidi, Harvard, “Plan Dalet,” Journal of Palestine Studies, Autumn, 1988, p. 17)

    The total land area of West Jerusalem (the New City) in 1947 was 19,331 dunams (about 4,833 acres) of which 40 per cent was owned by Palestinian Muslims and Christians, 26.12 per cent by Jews and 13.86 per cent by others, including Christian communities.
    Government and municipal land made up 2.90 per cent and roads and railways 17.12 per cent.

    East Jerusalem (the Old City) consisted of 800 dunams (about 240 acres) of which five dunams (just over one acre) were Jewish owned and the remaining 795 dunams were owned by Palestinian Muslims and Christians. (“Assessing Palestinian Property in the City,” by Dalia Habash and Terry Rempel, Jerusalem 1948: The Arab Neighbourhoods and their Fate in the War, edited by Salim Tamari, The Institute of Jerusalem Studies, 1999, map, pp. 184-85)

    • Talkback
      June 26, 2017, 11:26 am

      Emet doesn’t accept the basic common concept that if people live in a country for thousands of years they have a natural claim. He thinks that if someone claims that he or she is a personal descendant from someone who allegedly lived there before the others that its his or her land.

      Imagine the laughter if someone would argue like this outside of a mental institute and in a court of a real democratic state.

      • eljay
        June 26, 2017, 12:39 pm

        || Talkback: Emet … thinks that if someone claims that he or she is a personal descendant from someone who allegedly lived there before the others that its his or her land. … ||

        The only claim that really matters to Jewish supremacists – Zionists – is:
        – a religious conversion to Judaism; or
        – descent from someone who underwent a religious conversion to Judaism.

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