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Israeli racism takes center stage at Manhattan JCC

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A month ago, JCC Manhattan, a center for Jewish life on the Upper West Side, provided a stage for an Israeli figure to justify racism against Palestinians, with such statements as “What I would want [in a two-state agreement] is maximal territory with minimal Arab citizens of that territory.”

No one deplored her comments, though when a member of the audience said that the U.S. should cut off all funding to Israel, the moderator quickly shut her down and the rabbi leading the event reminded the audience about showing respect to “the shared enterprise of Jewish community.”

The event was a March 19 discussion of the Israeli elections (podcast here), which had taken place two days before. Rabbi Ayelet Cohen, a director of programming at the center and an outspoken leader on gender questions, feminism and racial justice in the United States who also loves Israel, introduced Batya Kahana-Dror in glowing terms as a member of Israel’s orthodox community who has led “unrelenting battles for women’s rights.” Among others on the panel were Chemi Shalev of Haaretz and Rabbi David Ellenson of Hebrew Union College.

The moderator of the event was Ethan Bronner, a managing editor for international news at Bloomberg and a former Jerusalem bureau chief for the New York Times, operating comfortably inside a Jewish communal space. Bronner referred to the West Bank as Judea and Samaria and described the event as “a largely Jewish audience and a Jewish panel.”

But he also pressed Kahana-Dror on her view of Israel PM Benjamin Netanyahu’s controversial appeal to Jewish voters on election day to counter the Arab voters coming out in droves.

I want to ask Batya to address the Arab question. What you are hearing is people on this panel who were offended by the prime minister telling Jews in Israel, get out and vote because the left is bringing out Arabs. Were you offended by that?

Kahana-Dror rationalized the comments. Speaking in Hebrew, translated by Rabbi Cohen, she embraced the idea of Israel as an ethnocracy and disparaged the Palestinian political contribution to that society as demanding a Jewish “surrender” of identity:

What kind of democracy are we going to be? The Israeli democracy is a democracy which doesn’t identify with the Palestinians. It’s a different peoplehood that we want to give the character of the state. It’s a different situation from the European democracy. The Israeli democracy is an ethnocracy and wants to give precedence to the Jewish ethnicity. So the real problem is what’s going to be our future… What the Arabs want is a different kind of state, a neutral state, not a Jewish state. So are we going to surrender our Jewish identity and our Zionism?

Ethan Bronner

Ethan Bronner

Bronner pressed her for her response to Netanyahu’s appeal.

I can’t say that I felt good about it, that I felt comfortable about it, but on the other hand it represents the dilemma that I was trying to explain.

Bronner said that Netanyahu was “touching something real” in Israeli society, even though one could be critical of him for doing so. And Chemi Shalev then explained how Netanyahu’s comments seemed to many Israelis. They overwhelmingly see themselves as Jewish in nationality, not Israeli, and they see Israeli leftist NGOs working “in collusion” with Arabs to transform the society.

It sounds like some jargon, but the leftist NGOs– it’s become a big issue in Israel… The NIF [New Israel Fund] working on behalf of the Arabs, it’s a very touchy issue. What [Netanyahu] was trying to say and I think successfully was that these people are trying to make Israel less of a Jewish state.

As Shalev spoke, Bronner affirmed his analysis, saying “Of course” and “Right.”

No one said that such racial ideas would be outrageous and out of bounds in American politics.

Later Bronner pressed Kahana-Dror to describe the Palestinian “state” or “entity” that she wanted to live alongside. “Do you want to hang on to all of Judea and Samaria and the people in it. What is it you want?” She said:

What I would want if such an agreement could be achieved, is maximal territory with minimal Arab citizens of that territory.

There was nervous laughter (I hear, listening to the podcast), and Bronner encourages her view: “OK, but I mean, you can get there, there are things you can do to make that happen.”

Kahana-Dror then spoke of the Law of Return, which allows Jews from around the world to move to Israel:

There’s no other way to see it [except as] a law that declares Israel unilaterally as a Jewish state. Even the Supreme Court refused to permit reunification of Arab families because the overriding principle is that ultimately Israel is a Jewish state– and this gives us a problem in our democracy.

Here is a report on Israel’s racist policy against Palestinian family reunification from one of those leftwing NGOs, B’Tselem.

Soon after Kahana-Dror endorsed that policy, the floor was opened for questions and a woman said that she “was outraged when Netanyahu who I regard as a Tea Party Republican thumbed his nose at our president, my president, and spoke to the Congress” — a lot of applause — “and I was furious” when Israel told the “U.S. to go to hell” in the election returns. She went on:

Now I hear this sentiment: Are there any people who feel the way I do, that it’s about time that the United States tells Israel to go to hell and cut off all funding to Israel because obviously they don’t consider what the U.S. thinks?

The woman was booed, and Bronner ruled the question out.

Ok. Alright. We’ll move on to other questions.

Then Rabbi Cohen stepped in to suggest that the woman had been disrespectful.

I just want to remind us again, that the enterprise that we are engaged in is the shared enterprise of Jewish community. I really appreciate that people feel strongly and these are really important and essential issues… I ask you to try and treat one another with respect… to say what you think.. but to do so respectfully of one another.

So Kahana-Dror’s repeated justification of racism against “Arabs” gets a pass, but an American woman’s suggestion that the U.S. should cut off funds to Israel draws a rebuke. And you wonder why the American Jewish community is in a pickle over Israel.

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About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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61 Responses

  1. Krauss
    Krauss
    April 19, 2015, 10:12 am

    This is related and simply too important not to share:

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4648489,00.html

    Think about this next time you hear “liberal” Zionists/the “peace camp” talk about “reform from within” and how “pressure from BDS will empower the right”.
    Their racism and complicity in Apartheid is everywhere and constant.

    Whether in Israel or at the JCC.

    • Marnie
      Marnie
      April 19, 2015, 12:55 pm

      That was disgusting and you’re exactly right. A liberal zionist is a zionist, period. That guy is nothing but a poser.

      These young guys are the real thing.

      By Haggai Matar
      |Published April 19, 2015
      WATCH: Two conscientious objectors sent to military prison

      Kaplan served two years in the army before deciding to refuse. The two are expected to serve additional prison terms.

      Two conscientious objectors, Yaron Kaplan and Ido Ramon, were sentenced to 30 and 10 days in prison, respectively, for their refusal to serve in the Israeli army.

      For Kaplan, it is his first imprisonment. Until now he served as a conscripted soldier and decided to refuse to complete the final year of his service.

      During a protest at the Tel Aviv induction base last week, Kaplan explained that he feels obligated to refuse as a way of outstretching a hand of peace to his Palestinian partners in the struggle for peace and security for both peoples in this land.

      For Ramon it is his second imprisonment. He previously declared that he would not serve in the army, “which describes itself as ‘the most moral army in the world’ but rules over millions of people under occupation, violating their most basic rights.”

      The two are expected to be jailed again after their release.

      • Boo
        Boo
        April 20, 2015, 1:21 pm

        “The two are expected to be jailed again after their release”

        So the government considers each subsequent refusal to be a separate offense? And can jail them anew each time? Even in the depths of the Vietnam war, when getting a 1-O was akin to winning the lottery, “No Double Jeopardy” continued to be a fundamental precept of US jurisprudence, and refuseniks could only be tried and imprisoned once. Is Israel evading that legal principle by claiming each new refusal is a new “crime” — or are they simply ignoring it?

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        April 20, 2015, 2:44 pm

        Boo,

        Stands to reason. So they can say: “Militarist, who, us? Not on your life. Our objectors only get a couple days, not even a slap on the wrist.”

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        April 20, 2015, 8:35 pm

        Boo, why do you think American legal principles apply in Israel? Israel has its own legal system.

    • April 19, 2015, 12:59 pm

      The racism of the Zionists is over the top.

      The truly amazing thing about it is they do not see themselves as racists. Indeed, they view themselves as the victims of racism.

      Anyone exposing their racism does so due to antisemitism, or the term that has recently been put out there (David Horowitz’s doing?), “Jew hatred:”.

      These are some very deluded, very dangerous people.

      • pabelmont
        pabelmont
        April 19, 2015, 7:28 pm

        They have been “given permission” to be racists by the Zionist Project from day-1. Or, you might say of some of the older ones, “they have given themselves permission” to be racists. And had the gall to insist that the UNGA reverse its “Zionism is a form of racism” resolution.

        “Hey, its our country,” they seem to say, “and we can do what we want with it.” Including throwing out 85% of the non-Jewish Palestinians who lived there in 1947 (half if you count the entire territory of Palestine instead of only Israel-48). Yes, it is their country, they made it that way by force of arms, and they’ve performed their racism the same way.

        What’s really galling in this story is the miserable rabbi in Manhattan who says American Jews should all make nice within the Jewish Community and support crimes committed by Jews (and support the criminals) just because they are part of a so-called Jewish Community.

        A lot of Open Hillel types seem to be saying that there are many Jewish Communities, and not all of them stand up for criminality.

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        April 20, 2015, 10:58 am

        @pabelmont
        Agree. It’s very frightening, when I consider the power of the Israel Lobby within the US governing class. My country, USA, hitching its big-ass wagon to this tiny, demented star!

  2. traintosiberia
    traintosiberia
    April 19, 2015, 11:15 am

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/19/opinion/sunday/anti-semitism-in-the-soccer-stands.html?action=click&pgtype=Homepage&version=Moth-Visible&module=inside-nyt-region&region=inside-nyt-region&WT.nav=inside-nyt-region&_r=0

    Why NYT is focusing on events at a Stadium while parlaying the assertion of Simon Weisenthal center ?

    Neo Nazi and Jewish forces have been working together in Europe and USA targeting Islam and Muslim openly since 911.

    Violence has been its normative expression .

    http://wideshut.co.uk/edl-officially-announce-ties-to-zionist-state-of-israel/

    So why does NYT ignore racism against Muslim at home within US ? Spencer,Geller or the soft less strident articulation of racism by the rabbi above are not isolated phenomenon .They are the different facets of an organizing principle .At various time different Jewish Bodies have entered ,got out and re entered with changed names and new faces to further the anti Muslim crusade in US and Europe using the frank neo Nazi. NYT gets upset when some of these Neo Nazi don’t listen to the original master anymore .

  3. Eva Smagacz
    Eva Smagacz
    April 19, 2015, 11:36 am

    “What I would want [in a two-state agreement] is maximal territory with minimal Arab citizens of that territory.”

    Clear echoes of “Lebensraum” and “Judenrein”. The only question is how far are likes of Batya Kahana-Dror and Ethan Bronner willing to go to achieve that.

    • johneill
      johneill
      April 19, 2015, 12:20 pm

      exactly what i thought. it can’t be long before mainstream american media picks up on the stench of fascism coming from israel. perhaps they’ll even ask a palestinian about “the arab question.”

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        April 20, 2015, 11:04 am

        @ johnell
        Wish I could agree that “it can’t be long.” I don’t see US main media discussing the stench of fascism in the US-installed current Ukraine regime, do you? Israel is supporting those neo-Nazis too & they are led by Jewish oligarchs.

  4. Mooser
    Mooser
    April 19, 2015, 11:54 am

    Well, I was tempted to make one, but I won’t. There’s really no comparison..

  5. OyVey00
    OyVey00
    April 19, 2015, 11:56 am

    This really only sounds baffling if you assume these people to have a universal morality. Once you realize that everything they say or do is guided by the question “Is it good for the Jews?”, then their behavior really is completely logical.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      April 19, 2015, 3:00 pm

      “Is it good for the Jews?”, then their behavior really is completely logical.”

      I like you “OyVey00” you always express a lot of admiration for Zionism. You are pretty sure Zionism has been “good for the Jews”?

  6. Mooser
    Mooser
    April 19, 2015, 12:04 pm

    “Then Rabbi Cohen stepped in to suggest that the woman had been disrespectful.”

    And it would be a mitvot to rough her up or direct some epithets at her on the way out, especially if she is unaccompanied by a male? Very thoughtful, Rabbi.

    And here we see how much can be attained and understood when a discussion doesn’t cross “certain red lines”.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      April 19, 2015, 4:53 pm

      I hope that woman did not feel “uncomfortable” or “singled out”.

  7. traintosiberia
    traintosiberia
    April 19, 2015, 12:06 pm

    I have come to look at the soft racism as the precursor to much wider more coordinated more participatory racism often eventually sanctioned by the government and by the competing political rivals for different purposes .
    The racism also can be created in a way that the target remains fluid . Anti Arab hysteria in Europe or in US have its origin in the soft racism promoted by Israel in different forums for decades .Anti Iran was been added when that became a necessity to the Zionist . Now it is Islam and Muslim.
    it is no surprise to hear blatant violent racist comments from media, think tank or from the politicians when the softer racism are offered as ready default explanation for the social situation or political attitudes of the Islamic countries
    The racism supports ,by its very nature of attitude or reasoning ,violence .

    One can’t have land as big and as large as possible without the people who are already living there having a voice.Unless those very poignant voices are going to be manipulated and abused by identifying them as the sound of the swamp of the bigotry for more land grabbing it makes sense to pause,reflect,and question not only the rabbi but the silence of the audience .

  8. Boomer
    Boomer
    April 19, 2015, 12:19 pm

    Thanks for this report. Some might say that it isn’t the “American Jewish Community” that is “in a pickle over Israel,” but rather the Palestinians, and all Americans–regardless of religion or ethnicity–who object to the U.S. policy of enabling Israel’s mistreatment of the Palestinians.

  9. ckg
    ckg
    April 19, 2015, 12:36 pm

    And I see the NYT editorial board today rightly denounces anti-Semitism among European soccer fans but says not a word about racism among Israel’s soccer fans and Beitar Jerusalem FC management.

    • John O
      John O
      April 19, 2015, 1:16 pm

      Nothing in that editorial about (regarding the UK situation) the far worse racism black footballers have had to endure for years; or about the latest incident at a recent Liverpool match, where someone said on Twitter that the sight of two Muslims at prayer during the half-time interval was disgraceful. To Liverpool’s credit, they are investigating this and I hope will come down like a ton of bricks should the offender turn out to be a Liverpool supporter. (My initial reaction was to assume that the two guys were praying to God to get their team out of some desperate hole – something I’m sure every one of us has done at one time or another.)

      • ckg
        ckg
        April 19, 2015, 3:59 pm

        Thanks John. The editorial says

        The problem is getting worse, according to Kick It Out, a British watchdog organization, which said in March that there were more than 30 instances of anti-Semitic slurs reported in the first half of the season, surpassing last year, with chants of “Yids” and “Kill the Jews” heard at games attended by Jewish fans.

        I looked on Kick it Out’s website and found that it broke down the EPL discrimination on social media by category:

        The distribution of the messages when broken into the different categories of discrimination read as follows:
        Race (28%)
        Gender (25%)
        Sexual Orientation (19%)
        Disability (11%)
        Antisemitism (9%)
        Islamophobia (5%)
        Age (2%)
        Gender Reassignment (1%)

        Liverpool’s Mario Balotelli, who is black, received far and away the most discriminatory comments on social media.

  10. amigo
    amigo
    April 19, 2015, 2:15 pm

    First , thanks to MW for putting this out there.This is what Mondo Weiss means to me .We would never ever know about such openly racist and bigoted views without MW.

    That these people get to rant in this manner with virtual immunity is to say the least a disgrace to all that is just and decent.Imagine anyone referring to Jews being the wrong “Peoplehood ” and not worthy of participating equally in the many democracies they are citizens of.

    Why old abe foxman would blow a fuse.

    • annie
      annie
      April 19, 2015, 4:35 pm

      dealing w/zionism — it’s a completely different standard of what’s acceptable under other circumstances.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 19, 2015, 9:08 pm

        “Then Rabbi Cohen stepped in to suggest that the woman had been disrespectful.”

        Gee, too bad we aren’t living a couple of hundred years ago. The Rabbi could have called that woman out as a witch, and applied the float test.
        I’m sorry, but there’s just enough parfait gentil knight left in me for that to really piss me off. Not done Rabbi, not done! No doubt the Rabbi felt nice and safe and confortable and un-singled-out doing it.

  11. Laurent Weppe
    Laurent Weppe
    April 19, 2015, 4:13 pm

    “What I would want [in a two-state agreement] is maximal territory with minimal Arab citizens of that territory.”

    So I suppose she’d favor expelling most of the 3 million Mizrahim…
    (This kinda reminds me of France, where people tend to “forget” that virtually everyone south of the Massif Central is descended from Arabs & Berbers)

    • Walid
      Walid
      April 19, 2015, 11:51 pm

      “This kinda reminds me of France, where people tend to “forget” that virtually everyone south of the Massif Central is descended from Arabs & Berbers” (Laurent)

      That’s a new one for me.

      • Laurent Weppe
        Laurent Weppe
        April 20, 2015, 12:49 pm

        The former province of Septimania was under moor rule for 50 years during the eighth century, and intermarriage between Muslims and Christians were far from being unheard of (in fact, the Muslim lord of Septimania marrying the daughter of the duke of Aquitaine Odo the Great was the excuse Charles Martel used to justify pillaging south-west France): Occitans and Arabs have been cousins for 13 centuries

      • Walid
        Walid
        April 20, 2015, 9:03 pm

        Thanks, Laurent.

    • MRW
      MRW
      April 20, 2015, 8:34 pm

      Merci pour ça, Laurent.

  12. Shmuel
    Shmuel
    April 19, 2015, 5:34 pm

    It’s all right there in the JCC Manhattan mission statement:

    … DIVERSE … ENGAGES … VALUES … IDEAS … redefining what Jewish life means today … diverse … innovative … everyone … broad and inclusive … a better, fairer world … accessibility …. inclusive and accommodating … different backgrounds …

    AND …

    We are deeply connected to Israel.
    Our community connects to Israel through its sights, sounds, history, and complexity. We embrace the challenge of weaving our relationships with Israel into our diverse Jewish identities.

    To paraphrase a certain US auto-maker who wasn’t particularly fond of Jews: They can have any kind of Judaism they like, as long as it is “deeply connected to Israel”.

    It is noteworthy that no other doctrinal demands are made in JCC Manhattan’s “vision”.

    Former Jewish Home (Habayit Hayehudi) candidate and champion of (some) women’s rights Ms. Kahana-Dror was in exactly the right place, and Ethan Bronner and Rabbi Cohen were only defending JCC Manhattan’s “core value(s)”.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      April 19, 2015, 8:59 pm

      “They can have any kind of Judaism they like, as long as it is “deeply connected to Israel”.”

      Watch as we pull the plug.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 19, 2015, 9:13 pm

        “a certain US auto-maker who wasn’t particularly fond of Jews:”

        Oddly enough, we have three Fords now (2-door, SUV and pick-up) and we have had Fords for years. Oh, it get’s worse, Shmuel, it gets worse, for years I rode BMW bikes. Until I saw myself ride by reflected in a plate-glass window. I could’a been a dispatch rider for the Wermacht or something. Sold those pronto.

      • Marnie
        Marnie
        April 19, 2015, 11:59 pm

        You can’t do it fast enough!

  13. Shingo
    Shingo
    April 19, 2015, 5:55 pm

    This proves Reuven Rivlin’s point yet again – that Israel is a sick society.

    Not only is the racism do blatant, but we even see so called liberal and progressive Zionists attacking the left.

    • Laurent Weppe
      Laurent Weppe
      April 19, 2015, 8:03 pm

      Any society where institutionalized oppression has become a vital pillar of the ruling-class’ power structure will develop this type of (often fatal in the long term) sickness.

  14. Rooster
    Rooster
    April 19, 2015, 6:14 pm

    Wow. How is it that Bronner is/was allowed anywhere NEAR mideast reporting in the United States?

    Judea/Samaria? Really?

    “Things you can do to make that happen.” Chilling, Bronner. The words that lubricate fascism.

    The only democracy here is Herrenvolk democracy.

    But even in JCC Manhattan, the Palestinian narrative is breaking through, at long last. It is refreshing to see the fallout as Zionism in America transitions from “blissful ignorance” to “entitled racism.”

  15. JLewisDickerson
    JLewisDickerson
    April 19, 2015, 6:44 pm

    RE: “And you wonder why the American Jewish community is in a pickle over Israel.” ~ Weiss

    IN CASE YOU’RE WONDERING (from The Phrase Finder):

    In a pickle

    ● Meaning

    In a quandary or some other difficult position.

    ● Origin

    The earliest pickles were spicy sauces made to accompany meat dishes. Later, in the 16th century, the name pickle was also given to a mixture of spiced, salted vinegar that was used as a preservative. The word comes from the Dutch or Low German pekel, with the meaning of ‘something piquant’. Later still, in the 17th century, the vegetables that were preserved, for example cucumbers and gherkins, also came to be called pickles.

    The ‘in trouble’ meaning of ‘in a pickle’ was an allusion to being as disoriented and mixed up as the stewed vegetables that made up pickles. This was partway to being a literal allusion, as fanciful stories of the day related to hapless people who found themselves on the menu. The earliest known use of pickle in English contains such an citation. The Morte Arthure, circa 1440, relates the gory imagined ingredients of King Arthur’s diet:

    He soupes all this sesoun with seuen knaue childre, Choppid in a chargour of chalke-whytt syluer, With pekill & powdyre of precious spycez.
    [He dines all season on seven rascal children, chopped, in a bowl of white silver, with pickle and precious spices]

    The figurative version of the phrase, meaning simply ‘in a fix’ or, in the almost identical 19th century phrase ‘in a stew’, arrives during the next century. . .

    . . . There are a few references to ill pickles and this pickle etc. in print in the late 16th century, and Shakespeare was one of the first to use in a pickle, in The Tempest, 1610:

    ALONSO:
    And Trinculo is reeling ripe: where should they
    Find this grand liquor that hath gilded ’em?
    How camest thou in this pickle?

    TRINCULO:
    I have been in such a pickle since I
    saw you last that, I fear me, will never out of
    my bones: I shall not fear fly-blowing. . .

    SOURCE – http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/in-a-pickle.html

    • JLewisDickerson
      JLewisDickerson
      April 20, 2015, 3:15 am

      P.S. RE: “The earliest pickles were spicy sauces made to accompany meat dishes… The ‘in trouble’ meaning of ‘in a pickle’ was an allusion to being as disoriented and mixed up as the stewed vegetables that made up pickles.” ~ from above

      MY COMMENT: Consequently, it seems to me that “in a pickle” should be updated to “in a relish”!

      relish
      noun rel·ish \ˈre-lish\
      : a seasoned sauce that is used to add flavor to other foods and that is made of chopped fruit or vegetables; especially : such a sauce made from pickles
      http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/relish

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 25, 2015, 9:59 pm

        Living, as I do, in Wodehouse and still playing with matches, I came across “in the soup” or even better “in the mulligatawny” for being, well, “in a pickle”. As in: “When the horse on which I bet the family chemise came in first, in the next race, that is, I knew I was deep in the mulligatawny, with no financial life-raft in sight.”

  16. annie
    annie
    April 19, 2015, 7:11 pm

    just goes to show you can’t tell a book from it’s cover. her hippy dippy hairdo w/the scarf and glowing smile and twinkling eyes — and she’s a friggin racist. blatant as the sky is blue.

  17. eGuard
    eGuard
    April 19, 2015, 7:17 pm

    The twitter MJayRosenberg account is down for days, and MW doesnt know what or why?

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      April 19, 2015, 9:01 pm

      “The twitter MJayRosenberg account is down for days, and MW doesnt know what or why?”

      Maybe MJRosenberg had an attack of good sense and stopped tweeting. It doesn’t suit everybody.
      In any case, I don’t think he reports on his actions to Mondo.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 19, 2015, 9:20 pm

        Of course, please, I’m not saying that he shouldn’t! A call once in a while, an e-mail, is it that hard? A quick wass’up bro’ or ‘Hey! Hows by you?’ what could it hurt? People worry!

  18. lonely rico
    lonely rico
    April 19, 2015, 7:30 pm

    Batya Kahana-Dror … who has led “unrelenting battles for women’s rights.”

    UH ?

    Battles FOR rights for some women,

    AGAINST rights for other (Palestinian) women!

    How do they manage it without their heads exploding ?

  19. RoHa
    RoHa
    April 19, 2015, 9:35 pm

    ‘the rabbi leading the event reminded the audience about showing respect to “the shared enterprise of Jewish community.” ‘

    Maintaining an oppressive ethnocracy is the shared enterprise of the Jewish community? If so, that gives a pretty good reason for branding Jews in general as enemies of humanity. Did the rabbi not realise he (or maybe she) was promoting and justifying anti-Semitism?

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      April 21, 2015, 10:44 am

      “the shared enterprise of Jewish community.”

      Well, if it is a successful enterprise, I expect a dividend check. Where is it?

  20. ivri
    ivri
    April 19, 2015, 11:11 pm

    An important distinction is in place here: racism would be relevant only if it was directed against Arabs per se but that`s already not the case at all. There are increasingly strong ties between Israel and Gulf countries, even with the Jordanian elite and with Egyptian military. The dividing line is not ethnic but political so the racism charge is totally misplaced – a throwback to the past (that some just cannot let go out of mental inertia). The world now, in its advanced globalization phase, is an arena where political rivals compete for power and the confines of these new camps is what matters. That`s the only interpretational tool that really clarifies what goes on – not letting it cluttered with worn out slogans. Move on guys.

    • Walid
      Walid
      April 19, 2015, 11:40 pm

      “There are increasingly strong ties between Israel and Gulf countries, even with the Jordanian elite and with Egyptian military.” (Ivri)

      That’s because they share an equal disdain of Palestinians, making them sort of birds of a feather when it comes to racism.

    • oldgeezer
      oldgeezer
      April 19, 2015, 11:53 pm

      @ivri

      That’s absolute and total bs. Racism is always relevant. Racism is extremely relevant where power imbalances exist.

      I will agree that globalization changes some of the power dynamics. Money overtakes ancient irrational hatreds.

      “The dividing line is not ethnic but political so the racism charge is totally misplaced – a throwback to the past (that some just cannot let go out of mental inertia). ”

      I guess you feel the adl and the proven racist Foxman should close up shop as antisemitism is no longer relevant? A simple yes or no will do.

      • ivri
        ivri
        April 20, 2015, 4:05 am

        @Oldgeezer
        Such organizations were established in the New Land as a reaction to true and real bigotry in the Old World – rampant anti-Semitism for centuries – and they still monitor that. I am not claiming that all historical issues vanished altogether – relics of that still exist for sure – just highlighting the scene and main driving forces of this era of ours. Indeed, the ADL itself has been affected by that too – having become far more political than it used to be.

      • oldgeezer
        oldgeezer
        April 20, 2015, 8:03 am

        @ivri

        I knew I wouldn’t get a plain yes or no. Instead I got what boils down to an excuse of why it is different. Historical reasons for the adl but ignore zionist racism.

        DoubleStandards much?

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 20, 2015, 12:16 pm

        “DoubleStandards much?”

        Ol’ “ivri” wears a large button proclaiming “Je suis Generis”.

    • Boo
      Boo
      April 20, 2015, 1:31 pm

      “The dividing line is not ethnic but political so the racism charge is totally misplaced”

      Naaaah, the “politics” assertion is merely a tissue-thin veneer over racism going back to the founding of the state and expulsion of hundreds of thousands of indigenous Palestinians.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        April 20, 2015, 9:18 pm

        Racism is Zionist politics. Their racism and their politics are one and the same.

        Again perhaps the solution will have to take into account their incorrigible racism. But they don’t get absolution for it.

  21. eljay
    eljay
    April 20, 2015, 7:33 am

    Kahana-Dror rationalized the comments. Speaking in Hebrew, translated by Rabbi Cohen, she embraced the idea of Israel as an ethnocracy and disparaged the Palestinian political contribution to that society as demanding a Jewish “surrender” of identity:

    What kind of democracy are we going to be? The Israeli democracy is a democracy which doesn’t identify with the Palestinians. It’s a different peoplehood that we want to give the character of the state. It’s a different situation from the European democracy. The Israeli democracy is an ethnocracy and wants to give precedence to the Jewish ethnicity. So the real problem is what’s going to be our future… What the Arabs want is a different kind of state, a neutral state, not a Jewish state. So are we going to surrender our Jewish identity and our Zionism?

    IOW:
    – Israel is a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” and that’s how I like it.
    – Palestinians want a “neutral” state – presumably with equality – and not a supremacist state.
    – This will not do.

    Zio-supremacists are truly hateful and immoral people.

  22. CigarGod
    CigarGod
    April 20, 2015, 9:07 am

    But…thousands of missiles rain down on the most democratic people in the middle east.

    • Boo
      Boo
      April 20, 2015, 1:34 pm

      Strange, though, how it hasn’t “rained” there in so long now that you could almost call it a Biblical drought?!

  23. eusebio
    eusebio
    April 20, 2015, 9:52 am

    stop racism in World

  24. just
    just
    April 20, 2015, 2:10 pm

    How is it possible? “Land of the free, home of the brave”?

    Le ridicule.

  25. NER
    NER
    April 27, 2015, 4:25 am

    Like it or not, the Arabs in Israel are Israelis; not all of them, but all those who carry Israeli passports, pay taxes to the state and serve in government and the military. Mind you, not all Arabs are Muslim. A few are Christians and many are Jews.

    So how would you suggest categorizing the Arab population who happen to be Jewish? How should they choose their allegiance? Have they not suffered enough in having to hide and disregard their ethnic origins? Where would you like the new generation of Muslim and Christian Israelis, who love their country and sing its praises but still suffer racial and ethnic discrimination, to reside?

    In the face of a growing religious fanaticism in Israel and the surrounding Arab nations, the Israeli Arabs search to align themselves with the Palestinians. It is not only the “Left” that raises a cry of despair in the face of this extreme policy. The voiceless majority within the country, which can be traced on blogs and independent media, are searching for a peaceful solution to a bloody conflict.

    Some of the American Jewish community have conflicting loyalty to Israel, viewing it as a symbol of their racial identity but being opposed to its modern political and ideological ideals.

    It’s about time we stop the misrepresentation of self and others.

    Batya Kahana-Dror’s Jewish religion, which she shares with the Americans and Canadians and French, does not give her a right to discriminate against citizens of her own country.
    You can dislike Blacks, but you may not force them out of the state, nor kill them. You can detest Netanyahu’s policies but you should not punish the people who live there, who did not vote for him, nor support his actions.

    On both sides we deal here with a multi-headed beast that is hard to untangle and impossible to control.

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