Trending Topics:

‘So wait, the Nakba is…?’: Listening to Israelis discuss the Nakba

Israel/Palestine
on 62 Comments

How interesting it was to read the answers of Israelis who were asked about the Nakba for the video “So wait, the Nakba is…?”, done by De-Colonizer. Interesting but yet kind of disturbing.

The interesting part was the idea of going around in Tel Aviv and asking random Israelis about this topic. In my opinion this step taken by De-Colonizer is really brave, because one has no idea what and how their reactions would be. I wonder what would be the answers of Israelis living in other cities and in the settlements?

The disturbing part was reading the answers of the people who had no clue what the word Nakba means. How can a word, event, hold so much pain and suffering to some people and yet means nothing to the other people who were part of making it happen? I was thinking how would a Jewish person react if someone had no clue what the Holocaust means. How would they react if someone said the holocaust is a Jewish holiday, or Jewish celebration?

Reading the answers gave me a very unpleasant feeling about the ignorance that most of the Israelis are living. Should I blame the Israeli education system for example? Or blame those who don’t know what the meaning is because they don’t look for the truth and search for it?

What do they actually teach in Israeli schools about how the state of Israel was created? Do they tell the students that the land was empty without people when they got here, and that they didn’t have to expel anyone?

I would divide the Israelis’ answers into three parts. The first are those who know nothing about the meaning of Nakba and responded with really silly answers. For example, the Nakba is an Arab or religious holiday, or the day of the Arabs, or it’s a big stone. These kinds of answers make you realize that they have never even thought about how the state of Israel was created. But those people, when asked whether they support or don’t support the right of return for Palestinian refugees, some of them actually supported it.

The second part were the people who knew what it means, but I got the feeling that they don’t really accept what they are saying, that in order for Israel to be established it expelled and displaced people. Or maybe they think it’s the way things should have been done and that’s it.  Part of these people supported the right of return as long as it does not result to uprooting Israelis. The other part strongly opposes the return of Palestinian refugees.

The third were those who know exactly what the word means, and what happened during the Nakba. Those people admit what actually happened, they are aware of the meaning of the word, and most of them support the right of return as long as no Israelis have to be uprooted.

It also made me think about the long way Israeli citizens have in order to wake up from their dream, that Israel is a democratic state, only exclusive for Jewish people. Israel had succeeded in creating this comfortable bubble for its Jewish citizens, where as everything is doing is seen to be essential and for the benefits of its own citizens. I’m afraid that if they were given the option to go back in time and do it in another way, they wont change a single thing.

But at the end it gives me hope on how different things would be if those Israelis know exactly what happened in 1948. Would it help change the way things are?

After all those few Israelis living in Tel Aviv definitely do not represent the majority of the Israeli society, if we want real results we should hear the opinion of the Israelis living in the settlements, living in Hebron, and not in Tel Aviv. That’s why I can’t wait reading the book the creators of this video are writing. There I’d find the results of the survey that shows what all Jewish Israelis think about that topic.

About Yara Dowani

Yara Dowani is 23 years old living in Jerusalem. Studied sports management in Barcelona. Now working at the east Jerusalem YMCA as a youth coordinator. If she’d leave the country for too long Israel would abolish her right to live in Jerusalem.

Other posts by .


Posted In:

62 Responses

  1. Kris
    May 15, 2015, 10:31 am

    “Reading the answers gave me a very unpleasant feeling about the ignorance that most of the Israelis are living. Should I blame the Israeli education system for example? Or blame those who don’t know what the meaning is because they don’t look for the truth and search for it?

    “What they actually teach in Israeli schools about how the state of Israel was created? Do they tell the students that the land was empty without people when they got here, and that they didn’t have to expel anyone?”

    Maybe mondoweiss commentor jon_s, who says he teaches in Israel, could help us out here.

    • ziusudra
      May 16, 2015, 1:35 am

      Greetings Kris,
      Serching for the subjective truth between the conquerors & the conquered is senseless.
      You’d get the same answers in the Americas, Australia, Taiwan, So. Africa , Cypres, Tibet,etc.
      Every Conqueror had an ideology. Zionistan is no different than those in the past.
      ziusudra
      PS The Albanians have been walked upon by the Serbs since the 12thC, They even converted to Islam to get help. Some things ne’er change & solutions don’t occur.

  2. Landie_C
    May 15, 2015, 10:39 am

    I love this video. It demonstrates yet again that critical thinking is only possible if one is emotionally motivated (open enough) to activate it. But I disagree with Dowani. It’s not so much about knowing, but about wanting to know (wanting to remember) and about interpreting that knowledge in a way that is not merely self-serving. And answers or solutions offered up in the spur of the moment may not mean as much as Dowani seems to think.

    Gotta laugh at the young lady’s willingness to accede to Palestinian right of return… to the Negev. Bada bum… TISH!

    Of course my favorite interviewee was the gray-haired gentleman in the green T-shirt and denim jacket. When I visit Israel for the first time next year, I hope I meet many individuals like him.

    • just
      May 15, 2015, 11:19 am

      I liked him, too.

      I was even more impressed by the bearded gent with the long locks. The lady in green at the fence, and the young guy in the hoodie, and the young leftist lady seemed quite ‘open’, too.

      There does seem to be a true generational difference. I, too, am looking forward to the book. Thank you for sharing the video and your thoughts, Yara. Stay strong! As anyone can see in the video, some of the Israelis are just willfully deaf, dumb and blind, in denial, and remain deeply committed to their Zionist sins.

      • amigo
        May 15, 2015, 1:32 pm

        “As anyone can see in the video, some of the Israelis are just willfully deaf, dumb and blind – See more at ” just.

        A lot like Americans then .So catalan tells us.

        “Americans are awful at math, chemistry, history and pretty much every other subject.” – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/profile/catalan#sthash.UfpalmyX.dpuf

      • just
        May 15, 2015, 1:39 pm

        There’s a difference, amigo. ;-)

        And yes, there are some really willfully deaf, dumb and blind Americans, too! A lot of them are running for office, or are already ensconced in one.

      • amigo
        May 15, 2015, 2:34 pm

        just , “There’s a difference, amigo. ;-)”

        Dead right , there is a difference.Most if not all Americans know that their nation was built on theft, aggression and ethnic cleansing These Jewish citizens of Israel also know it but cannot openly say so , not because they are dumb but because they are dishonest bigots.I would much rather be bad at maths than a total failure at history and geography and moer importantly , knowing whats right and what,s wrong.

        In any case I was just trying to get catalan to bite .He reveals more of himself every time he posts.Much like the “potato man”. Notice the similarities!. Make a seemingly conciliatory entrance.Then when you find out that bs is quickly exposed take a mildly combative stance which inevitably ends with the same outcome at which point , the real person emerges.Catalan for example has taken to insulting the very people with whom he works and from whose nation he prospers. This is the typical zionist mindset and especially Israel firsters. Damned hypocrites , every single one of them.

      • catalan
        May 15, 2015, 3:14 pm

        “Catalan for example has taken to insulting the very people with whom he works and from whose nation he prospers” -amigo
        Friend,
        First of all I work for a municipality, therefore I answer to the local citizens, not the nation. Additionally, I do not hold a political office and have as much right to bitch as anyone else. I am not on welfare; I perform work of decent quality and of technical nature. I don’t feel that it is immoral for me to point out flaws in this country.
        I have mixed feelings about America. I am sorry but as an immigrant I will always be an outsider. There are things in every culture that are just not accessible to the newcomer, no matter how fluent my English or how local my mannerisms. Sadly, there are things that I will never be able to communicate to my son, because he is truly American, born here.
        It’s like, you can never become Bulgarian, no matter how well you speak the language. There is a set of unwritten cues that are invisible.
        Anyway, if I was an Israeli firster as you put it I could have moved there. I had the opportunity many times but didn’t do it.

      • amigo
        May 15, 2015, 4:52 pm

        “First of all I work for a municipality, therefore I answer to the local citizens, not the nation” catalan.

        First of all , you said the following!!.

        ““Americans are awful at math, chemistry, history and pretty much every other subject.” – See more at: link to – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/05/listenting-israelis-discuss#sthash.L5yygnPE.dpuf

        You insulted “All ” Americans.Don,t try to use lame excuses or irrelevant geographical distinctions to divert attention from your disloyal words .You are an ingrate, at best.

        “Additionally, I do not hold a political office and have as much right to bitch as anyone else “catalan.

        you certainly have the right to bitch.You were not bitching.You were insulting the people who give you sustenance and a place to live with endless possibilities.Do you tell them to their faces they are stupid or are you just a coward who makes such statements on a the web under a false name behind their backs.

        “. I am not on welfare; ” catalan.

        Are you saying people on welfare are forbidden to complain.How very fascist of you.

        As I stated , the more you post the more your bigotry and dishonesty show.

        “Friend,
        First of all I work for a municipality —-;”

        Don,t patronize me ,I am not your friend. I am very particular about the kind of friends I keep.They do not include apologists for apartheid and aggression or disloyal ingrates.

      • catalan
        May 15, 2015, 5:15 pm

        “You are an ingrate, at best.” Amigo
        I actually don’t feel that I owe gratitude to a country, any country. Certain individuals-teachers, friends, managers – absolutely. I just don’t buy this concept that I owe something to the American people as a whole. I pay lots and lots in taxes, you know.
        There is a lot of mediocrity here, scams, fraud. In general, people are spoiled, both because they are born in abundance, but also just from residing in such a powerful place. They think they are great because their country is powerful. Like the kid whose father is a prize fighter.
        I wasn’t insinuating friendship, just translating the word Amigo. I have no illusions and you have made your feelings about me abundantly clear. Pity, because I like Ireland and wish I had friends there.

      • Mooser
        May 15, 2015, 5:25 pm

        I assume, “catalan” that you have the proper documents allowing you to work in the US, and keep a US citizen from a job? You mentioned your immigration status was not kosher in an earlier comment.

      • Mooser
        May 15, 2015, 5:28 pm

        “There is a lot of mediocrity here,”

        And everywhere else. By definition.
        Funny how that works. But of course, you are above the common run, a cosmopolitan, and entitled to judge.

      • gamal
        May 15, 2015, 5:48 pm

        “Pity, because I like Ireland and wish I had friends there.”

        ah just have a listen to Pogue Mahone, it’s an instruction sadly you will have to follow, the Irish are too good for you, you will have to aim lower, the Welsh are always available.

      • just
        May 15, 2015, 6:17 pm

        “In general, people are spoiled, both because they are born in abundance, but also just from residing in such a powerful place.”

        There you go again with your sweeping indictments/broad brush catalan bs.

        Tell that to the terribly poor people living hardscrabble lives all over America, both in inner cities and in rural areas! “residing in such a powerful place” indicates that folks are “spoiled”? Really?

      • amigo
        May 15, 2015, 6:38 pm

        catalan, you are obviously a very shallow person and lack the benefit of an honest intellect and the wisdom of gratitude and fair play.

        I envy you , you have much to learn.

        Our discussion is over.My head needs a rest.The wall is too dense and obviously impenetrable and I have zero masochistic tendencies.

      • catalan
        May 15, 2015, 7:22 pm

        I assume, “catalan” that you have the proper documents allowing you to work in the US, and keep a US citizen from a job? – Mooser
        That’s kind of intrusive but yes, I am a U.S. citizen. Clean record and all. Look, there are things I like about living in the U.S., and things I don’t. It is obvious that when I say Americans, I mean some Americans. Nobel winners in chemistry are good at chemistry.
        I just get ticked by self righteousness. And these amazing justifications of the U.S. wars on Mexico, which Talknic presents as legally kosher, this laughable “referendum” in Texas that supposedly justifies taking that place over and converting it into a slave plantation, well that triggered me. But no, there are great people here like anywhere else. But you have to admit, there is so much scam and fraud too.

      • RoHa
        May 15, 2015, 7:41 pm

        “And yes, there are some really willfully deaf, dumb and blind Americans, too! A lot of them are running for office, or are already ensconced in one. ”

        I thought it was a Constitutional requirement for those seeking election.

      • Keith
        May 15, 2015, 8:21 pm

        CATALAN- “I don’t feel that it is immoral for me to point out flaws in this country.”

        I agree completely and encourage you to continue to do so. I would suggest, however, that your critique take into account the symbiotic relationship between the American empire and Israel, the militarism, the disregard for the rights of victims, etc. Also, the significant role of American Zionist Jews in shaping the goals, objectives and policy of empire and neoliberal globalization. I would think that elementary concern for intellectual and moral integrity would compel you to do so.

      • Mooser
        May 15, 2015, 9:19 pm

        “That’s kind of intrusive but yes, I am a U.S. citizen. Clean record and everything”

        Nobody said you had to answer. But since you did:

        “As to me I used to be an illegal working with Poles, Philippinos and others in the restaurant business.”

        “Known poverty. Been illegal.”

        “I have mixed feelings about America. I am sorry but as an immigrant I will always be an outsider.”

        “And here in the States I am an immigrant with a Slavic accent so I don’t think I make a good American nationalist.”

      • catalan
        May 15, 2015, 9:41 pm

        “Nobody said you had to answer. But since you did”: Mooser
        There is no contradiction. Being illegal is not a criminal offense. So that’s what I meant by clean record. The U.S. forgives it if you become a permanent resident.
        Not sure why you are attacking from that angle. Many Americans were illegal first and then became citizens. I am sorry if you have a problem with that.

      • just
        May 16, 2015, 8:14 am

        @ amigo: “Our discussion is over.My head needs a rest.The wall is too dense and obviously impenetrable and I have zero masochistic tendencies.”

        amigo~ thank you for your comments, and for being present in the best sense of the word. I have respect for your opinion, and I very much admire the above! Sometimes it’s better for one’s sanity to walk away…

      • Mooser
        May 16, 2015, 12:08 pm

        What can I say, Catalan, You’ve been everywhere, man.

      • catalan
        May 16, 2015, 12:45 pm

        What can I say, Catalan, You’ve been everywhere, man. – Mooser
        Icarus. The Greeks figured it all out 24 hundred years ago.

      • Mooser
        May 16, 2015, 1:26 pm

        “Icarus. The Greeks figured it all out 24 hundred years ago.”

        Yes, I think it was a wise old Greek who said: “You can take an ass around the world, and it won’t come home a donkey.”

        “catalan” let me give you a tip. When you comment, don’t put your name, linked to a word-searchable comment archive, above your comments. It’ll only cause you no end of trouble.

      • just
        May 16, 2015, 3:05 pm

        Well put, Mooser.

        Perhaps some immigrants to America might benefit from Kashua’s most recent column:

        “Sayed Kashua isn’t offended by Americans, try as they may

        …I also get offended when security guards in the airports here direct me to a different line for the security check. It usually involves their running some sort of cloth strips over my palms and a wait of a few seconds before I continue on my way to the terminal.

        I’m offended, but differently than in Israel: Here it’s with a smile of embarrassment, almost of gratitude. What in Israel would enrage me to the point of bursting veins and maybe also shouting about being a victim of discrimination and racism, leaves me here with a feeling of great unpleasantness – but not anger or an urge to cry out against the injustice.

        Maybe it’s because I’m a guest here and have no ambition to be an equal citizen, or possibly it’s connected to the saying that every Arab child has engraved on his forehead, “Al’arib adib” – meaning, roughly, the stranger must be polite.

        I am offended when I hear a broadcaster on the local radio station repeating the term “Islamo-Nazis” 10 times in five minutes in connection with a shooting incident in Texas that was caused by a cartoon contest about the prophet Mohammed. And I fidget uneasily in my chair whenever I hear the commentator Bill Maher convey a message of Islamophobia to his viewers – though it’s nonetheless different from the levels of frustration and anger and nerves that comments on radio and television in Israel generated in me. …

        …Sometimes I wonder whether the day will come when I will get mad at a politician or a local newspaper the way I did in Israel. Sometimes I think about my children and wonder how they feel, how the other kids treat Arabs in school, what they think of Muslims. Do my kids also behave like polite strangers? Do they too get offended sometimes?

        This week, I was seriously offended when a neighbor knocked on my door and introduced himself as the representative of the neighborhood committee. I smiled politely and asked him in for a cup of coffee, but he declined and said he had to go but only wanted to tell me that the grass on our lawn was too long, that it’s a blight on the neighborhood landscape and that I should mow it fast if I didn’t want a fine from the municipal authorities.

        I was affronted to the very depths of my soul, wanted to tell him to go find someone to give his mother’s mother a good shaking, that back home in Tira a neighbor who came with complaints about the grass would be shot on the spot, and that there is no grass in Tira anyway.

        I wanted to tell him that this whole thing that Americans have with their lawns is just sick, that all day long I hear the nonstop buzzing of lawn mowers, even though no one, but no one, ever goes out to the lawn except those who mow it.

        But I’m not like them. I don’t understand this national sport, on Saturdays and weekends, when the white neighbors ride their lawn mowers back and forth.

        “I am so sorry,” I found myself telling the neighborhood committee representative, though until then I’d never heard of any such committee, not to mention the fact that I have no idea what the name of the neighborhood is.

        “I am so sorry, sir,” I smiled and blushed with shame. “Our gardener actually apologized last week that he couldn’t come because he was sick,” I added, lying brazenly. “He promised to come tomorrow and deal with the lawn.”

        The neighbor nodded his head and said “Alright” before leaving, and I thanked him and stood at the entrance to the house, smiling at his receding back. If I’d had a white kerchief I probably would have waved it in his honor, too.

        “What did he want – that guy?” my wife asked.

        “For us to cut the grass,” I said, and restrained myself from accusing her of being responsible for the length of the grass, even though she has nothing to do with it.

        “The nerve,” she said. “What’s it his business?”

        “That’s how it is, it’s his country,” I said, and picked up the car keys.

        “Where are you going?”

        “To buy a lawn mower.”

        http://www.haaretz.com/blogs/sayed-kashua/.premium-1.656496

        Humor. It works.

      • catalan
        May 16, 2015, 4:12 pm

        “catalan” let me give you a tip. When you comment, don’t put your name, linked to a word-searchable comment archive, ”
        Mooser,
        you thrive on exposing contradictions. Tell me, if things are so bad for Israel with BDS – your solution – where are the celebrations? When will BDS deliver?

    • CigarGod
      May 17, 2015, 10:44 am

      Isn’t critical thinking a skill? I think it must be taught.

    • ritzl
      May 17, 2015, 3:28 pm

      Great comment.

  3. echinococcus
    May 15, 2015, 10:48 am

    hear the opinion of the Israelis living in the settlements, living in Hebron, and not in Tel Aviv.

    What for? You heard what they have to say in the most optimistic situation:
    “support the right of return as long as no Israelis have to be uprooted. ”
    Do you expect “settlers” to be somewhat more human than that nonsense?
    As if Zionist opinion had any weight –it’s being heard too much as it is.

  4. pabelmont
    May 15, 2015, 11:40 am

    “These kinds of answers make you realise that they have never even thought about how the state of Israel was created.”

    Hunh?? No, it means they never heard the word. But, of course, this itself is strange, because, wasn’t there a recent Israeli law passed to make it illegal to celebrate the Nakba (or to do it on Israeli independence day)? You’d think the law might have recited the N-word. But, it might have used a Hebrew word for catastrophe.

  5. amigo
    May 15, 2015, 12:58 pm

    One might have thought the GOI “Propaganda ministry” would have a screed on this to ensure Israel,s Jewish citizens would be properly prepared for awkward questions from anti semitic Jew haters who insist the light unto the nations would be involved in ethnic cleansing.

    It might suggest that as God gave Israel to the Jews , any suggestion of ethnic cleansing would be blasphemous and a blood libel.People who insist that Israel expelled non Jews should be reminded that they will incur the wrath of God for this unholy rhetoric.It might also include Golda Meir,s statement that there are no Palestinians so how could they have been expelled.

    Leaflets containing the facts about this mythical Nakba subject should be dropped on Israeli cities and towns to get the message out there and put a stop to these Palestinian lies and persecution of the Jewish State.The one and only Jewish State in the universe.

    QED. Nakba problem solved

  6. Stephen Shenfield
    May 15, 2015, 1:27 pm

    It would be helpful to have comparable results for (say) 25 years ago. My guess is that there has been progress. That is, if you asked Israelis at random 25 years ago, even in Tel Aviv, it would have been surprising even to find one or two who knew what the Nakba was. The new historians made denial much more difficult. According to Ilan Pappe they had some impact on school textbooks. That is one reason why age matters: it determines when they went to school, what their teachers and textbooks told them.

    Of course, knowledge in itself doesn’t automatically translate into willingness to right past wrongs. It has a polarizing effect because while it does prompt some in that direction it leads many others to open support for ethnic cleansing. But the genie is out of the bottle and getting it back in may be beyond the powers of Netanyahu, Bennett, et al.

    I was struck by the fearful body language of the woman who said: “I am of the left but we are in the minority.” I think the responses indicate that the “left” (which in Israel means conciliatory toward Palestinians) is not as small and isolated a minority as she feels it is. Fear generates silence, the silence creates an exaggerated impression of the weakness of the left, and that demoralizes the leftists. Bringing this to light is the most important contribution of videos like this.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      May 16, 2015, 3:57 pm

      ”the “left” (which in Israel means conciliatory toward Palestinians) ”

      No. No it certainly does not! It means ”trying to give the IMPRESSION of being conciliatory towards Palestinians, while in practice supporting – or at the very least not opposing – every war, siege and occupation practised by Israel”. Some of the worst war crimes have been committed by ‘moderate’ Israeli governments.

      Support for the Gaza massacre was well above 90% in all surveys done this summer. Quite a few Israelis didn’t think the ‘war’ had gone far enough. Very very few thought it was too harsh. The ‘left’ in the sense you portray it is virtually non-existent in Israel. The mask has fallen. What you see is what you get.

  7. DaBakr
    May 15, 2015, 3:38 pm

    Most Israelis know exactly what the nakba is. When and how long it will tkae for it to no longer be seen as a de-legitimization of Israel and accepted as a part of the evolution of the ME may hold the answer to when Israelis will be more forthcoming when approached by videographers on the subject. I could go on and make similar points about the Palestinians but it is the same ‘competing narrative’ ongoing since ’67

    • Stephen Shenfield
      May 16, 2015, 7:24 am

      DaBakr: The video clearly suggests that MANY Israelis have no idea what “nakba” means (unless they are all pretending not to know, which is hard to believe). So on what evidence do you base your assertion that “most Israelis know exactly what the nakba is”?

  8. W.Jones
    May 15, 2015, 4:07 pm

    This reminds me of lack of recognition of the Armenian genocide by the Israeli government, which Israeli professor Yair Auron showed in his book “The Banality of Denial: Israel and the Armenian Genocide”. He discusses times when the government has actively blocked private commemoration efforts.

    • Maximus Decimus Meridius
      May 16, 2015, 3:58 pm

      Haven’t the Israelis started making noises – though never translated into action – about the Armenian genocide after falling out with Turkey due to the Mavi Marmara massacre? It was around the same time they suddenly discovered the cause of the Turkish Kurds, even though they actively supported the Turkish military when it was waging war with, and killing tens of thousands of, Kurds.

      • echinococcus
        May 16, 2015, 4:26 pm

        The fact is that in the US the main lobbying effort to block any mention of genocide by the US government has always been borne by the Zionist lobby, year after year, and a major lobbying effort it is, in the face of very active protests by millions of Armenians, Greeks, and other people in the US. In the few years following the public expression of Palestine solidarity by Erdogan, then the Mavi Marmara piracy and murder, Zionists have been playing blackmail in plain daylight, with discreet expressions of sympathy with the Armenians while continuing to lobby to bar recognition of the Armenian genocide. Two reasons: the opposition factions allied to the Zionists in Turkey, who are working for the overthrow of Erdogan and a return to military dictatorship, are infinitely more nationalist and murderous than the Erdogan government; also the Zionists intend to keep the genocide of the Jews, trademarked “Holocaust”, as the single one worth remembering and mentioning.

      • just
        May 16, 2015, 5:25 pm

        Thanks for that comment, echinococcus.

      • Maximus Decimus Meridius
        May 17, 2015, 4:35 am

        @echinococcus

        Yes, good comment. I do agree that much Zionist opposition to recognising the Armenian genocide has to do not only with the importance of the Israeli-Turkish relationship, but also to the ‘stealing our holocaust’ narcissism. The Armenians, like the Jews are also a succesful, well-off ethnic minority in the US, and the Zionists don’t want any ‘competition’ in the sympathy stakes.

        Pathetic.

  9. Qualtrough
    May 16, 2015, 12:56 am

    I am sorry but as an immigrant I will always be an outsider. There are things in every culture that are just not accessible to the newcomer, no matter how fluent my English or how local my mannerismsCatalan

    Question Catalan: Interesting. Immigrants as outsiders in every culture. We are constantly being told that Israel is the only safe place, the only welcoming place, the only home for Jews. And yet we now learn from you that they will always be outsiders. Or is it just different for Israel?

  10. Marnie
    May 16, 2015, 3:09 am

    This was an interesting video. Looks like Tel Aviv or Yafo maybe? I was pleasantly surprised by some, mostly disappointed or angered by others. Can’t imagine that same interview taking place in Hebron or Jerusalem. That old dog sitting behind a desk repeating the same garbage to justify the Nakba then to say “they just left” as if for some reason yet unknown, Palestinians just up and leave the lands they’ve tended and nurtured for centuries – go figure. Well, can they return – absolutely not. See a lot of fear in the older folks – fear of retribution or revenge, and a fear strong enough to keep them from opening their hearts.

  11. NoMoreIsrael
    May 16, 2015, 10:34 am

    Just imagine if 99% of the American people belonged to the Ku Klux Klan.

    You don’t have to imagine it. That place exists. It’s called Israel.

  12. RobertHenryEller
    May 16, 2015, 12:27 pm

    “How can a word, event, hold so much pain and suffering to some people and yet means nothing to the other people who were part of making it happen?”

    Because it is essential that the word means nothing to the people complicit in the pain and suffering in order for the pain and suffering to take place.

  13. Danaa
    May 16, 2015, 3:12 pm

    “How would they react if someone said the holocaust is a Jewish holiday, or Jewish celebration? ”

    But the Holocaust IS treated as a “celebration” of sorts even if it’s supposed to be tinged with sadness. In one sense it’s more like a “commemoration” not unlike Tisha b’av which commemorates the loss of the temple. It is a ‘celebration’ because hidden within the folds of the outward commemoration are the poison darts of a weaponized history. And poison darts are there to be wielded, and in the case of the Holocaust they are, as we all know.

    On Holocaust day, the jews of Israel do not just feel sad. They also feel totally empowered as “the greatest and most significant victims ever”. They also feel superior, as in having the high moral ground for any slight “the others” (ie, goys, not necessarily Palestinians) feel has been administered to them. Such as the compensation racket from Germany. Or the Nakba the Palestinians “claim” was inflicted upon them by the jews (and I mean “the jews” in this case, as in the great collective of them, inside israel and outside). Israelis on Holocaust day, KNOW why they DESERVED Israel – it’s not even a question of what the cost could have been to others. As in “it doesn’t really matter. SOMEONE had to pay the price”. So there is no need to take notice of such words like “Nakba” (let them try the israelis think – consciously and not – but we are still the master victims! and we know how the histoical narrative game goes – we won it every time, didn’t we?).

    One does not have to even be an israeli to partake in the Holocaust as ‘celebration” even if the weaponization has to be treated more gingerly elsewhere. Suffice it to be a grand supporter of israel in the world, especially a Jewish one. the Holocaust day for example is rarely accompanied by feelings of good will towards others who may be persecuted elsewhere, except those who are “conveniently remembered” like Tibetans or Darfurians. among jewish people in particular, you will not likely find an iota of sympathy towards the upward of 10 Million Russian civilians lost in the Great War. Or the Millions of Poles. Certainly not the millions of German civilians made to pay a huge price in death and suffering after it was all over.

    Of course, the people who have become accustomed to using the holocaust as a WMD, will deny the Nakba commemoration, precisely because deep at heart, they fear it turning also into a weapon, one that could be used to counter and poke holes in the holocaust narrative as justifying any and all obnoxious, disgusting actions perpetrated by the would-be inheritors to the holocaust tale-of-tales. The people of israel – the ignorant, the ugly, the bad, the wanting-to-be-good, and the actually good (all few 10’s of thousands in the last category) – they all know the implications and dynamics hidden within a single word. They know because they did it themselves throughout their entire history. After all, the entire bible is an informercial, designed to lead the jewish reader/inheritor, religious or not, to a place of great superiority, one that is beyond history.

    And this is why we will not only see no change in attitudes towards the nakba, but instead we’ll see further hardening of the hearts, minds and souls. Until all that’s left, after all this hardening are calcified residues of a once interesting people.

    • just
      May 16, 2015, 3:54 pm

      Well said and done, Danaa!

      A standing ovation from me to you.

      When I heard one of the interviewees say that it is ‘like the Palestinian Independence’ (@ 2:03) in response to what is the Nakba, I knew it was hopeless to expect much at all.

    • Keith
      May 16, 2015, 6:21 pm

      DANAA- “It is a ‘celebration’ because hidden within the folds of the outward commemoration are the poison darts of a weaponized history. And poison darts are there to be wielded, and in the case of the Holocaust they are, as we all know.”

      DANAA- “And this is why we will not only see no change in attitudes towards the nakba, but instead we’ll see further hardening of the hearts, minds and souls. Until all that’s left, after all this hardening are calcified residues of a once interesting people.”

      You are very eloquent and remind me of Arundhati Roy. Mondoweiss would benefit from more frequent comments by Danaa.

      • just
        May 16, 2015, 7:13 pm

        +1, Keith!

      • Danaa
        May 23, 2015, 2:49 am

        Keith, you flatter me so – Arundhati Roy – that’s quite a compliment. Ever worry it might go to my head? and what then?

        Just, thanks to you too – always glad to hear from you.

        And Mooser, what can I say? more unsayables perhaps?

    • Mooser
      May 16, 2015, 11:43 pm

      Danaa, could it be that one Zionist commenter here simply said the unsayable when he said: “The Holocaust justifies the Nakba completely”?

      • echinococcus
        May 16, 2015, 11:57 pm

        Mooser, wait! Unsayable? How so? I always believed it to be official Zionist doctrine.
        At any rate, if this were unsayable it’d be worse than swallowing camels whole and straining at an itty-bitty gnat.

  14. Vera Gottlieb
    May 17, 2015, 5:55 am

    During Nazi Germany times, many Germans didn’t want to hear the truth either. Why risk being faced with such unpleasant truths? Ignorance is bliss?

  15. Vera Gottlieb
    May 17, 2015, 10:41 am

    Since 1948…how many Jews did Arabs push into the sea??? How much longer are these people going to cling to this lie? Such narrow-mindness is absolutely mind boggling. It isn’t the Arabs, it is israelis who are pushing themselves into the sea.

  16. truth2power
    May 18, 2015, 11:15 am

    One of my father’s favourite sayings was: “Better to be thought a fool than open your mouth and prove it”!
    The ignorance (possibly feigned as an easier option than addressing their uncomfortable consciences, maybe?) of most of the interviewees was literally staggering – considering the history for ALL in the region since 1948. Only two of them, the man in the green shirt and the long haired, bearded man, addressed both what ‘nakba’ is and potential solutions with care, honesty and thought.
    The most encouraging part of this video, in the main, is the younger the interviewees were – the more open they seemed to see the wrong and be prepared and open to start addressing the needs of the refugees who have left. This can only be good for the future. Thank you for making this video and I shall certainly look forward to reading the book.

  17. Mayhem
    May 20, 2015, 9:41 am

    This drumming up of recognition for the Nakba is partly but significantly a manifestation of “Holocaust envy” which describes envy towards the Jews, due to the perception that the international community has endorsed the Jewish people since the Holocaust.

    The Holocaust has been a political factor up to present day, as there are Jews and non-Jews who use it to support the claims that Israel is needed as a Jewish homeland. Holocaust denial can be traced to Holocaust envy. By denying that the Holocaust has happened, one can try to bereave the Jewish people of international support.

    And the flip side of the coin …
    Holocaust Denial Still Rife Among Palestinians
    Few, if any, Palestinians agree with PA chief Mahmoud Abbas’ newly stated position that ‘the Holocaust is the most heinous crime’ of modern times. Many on the Israeli side have poured scorn on Abbas’s muted recant, pointing out his long history as a Holocaust denier, having entitled his Ph.D. dissertation “The Other Side: the Secret Relationship Between Nazism and Zionism.”
    On dozens of Arabic-language web sites, the overwhelming opinion of Abbas’ comments acknowledged the Holocaust were negative, many saying that Abbas had either been brainwashed, or had become a “turncoat” who is “enslaved by the lies being spread by the Zionists.

    • a blah chick
      May 20, 2015, 10:08 am

      “This drumming up of recognition for the Nakba is partly but significantly a manifestation of “Holocaust envy”

      Oh, my dear Lord.

    • just
      May 20, 2015, 10:22 am

      @ Mayhem’s “Holocaust envy”.

      sick, sicker, sickest. Idiotic, too.

      (your first filthy link is dead btw)

    • eljay
      May 20, 2015, 10:35 am

      || Mayhem: This drumming up of recognition for the Nakba is partly but significantly a manifestation of “Holocaust envy” … ||

      You sound like someone who’s annoyed by the screams of the victims in the rapist’s basement because they interfere with your fawning appreciation of his oft-repeated story about how he was abused as a child.

    • amigo
      May 20, 2015, 12:48 pm

      “Holocaust envy” .Mayhem.

      So the basis of Jew hatred is because 6 million Jews were exterminated and we goys envy Jews for their good luck.

      Mayhem , you are truly insane as is the buffoon who coined that phrase.

      • Mayhem
        May 20, 2015, 6:35 pm

        I didn’t make up this term – my first link went awry. I have only mentioned a behaviour that has been widely acknowledged and recognised; the usual suspects at MW can’t help themselves and fly off the handle.
        The term “Holocaust envy” has come into controversial parlance in contemporary cultural criticism, referring to efforts to seek recognition and redress for other, less prominent genocides.
        I note no concern whatsoever about what Abbas and the Palestinians have to say about the Holocaust on their side of the ledger.

    • Kris
      May 20, 2015, 3:16 pm

      Mayhem, it is so interesting how human minds work, and how we use projection as a psychological defense mechanism.

      Maybe what you are trying NOT to become aware of is ” factitious disorder,” formerly known as Munchausen syndrome. This disorder apparently affects most Zionists, as evidenced by claims of “Jew hatred,” “antisemitism,” and a fixed belief in their own eternal victimhood, despite empirical evidence to the contrary.

      “Factitious disorder is a serious mental disorder in which someone deceives others by appearing sick, by purposely getting sick, or by self-injury. Factitious disorder symptoms can range from mild (slight exaggeration of symptoms) to severe (previously called Munchausen syndrome). The person may make up symptoms or even tamper with medical tests to convince others that treatment, such as high-risk surgery, is needed.

      “A factitious disorder is not the same as inventing medical problems for practical benefit, such as getting out of work or winning a lawsuit. Although people with factitious disorder know they are causing their symptoms or illness, they may not understand the reasons for their behavior.

      “Factitious disorder is mysterious and hard to treat. However, medical and psychological help are critical for preventing serious injury and even death caused by the self-harm typical of this disorder.”
      http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/factitious-disorder/basics/definition/con-20031319

Leave a Reply