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‘NYT’ reporters parrot Israeli claims re cherry tomato

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The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gave a speech to the United Nations General Assembly yesterday and touted Israeli “perfection” of the cherry tomato:

Israeli knowhow is everywhere. It’s in your computers’ microprocessors and flash drives. It’s in your smartphones, when you send instant messages and navigate your cars. It’s on your farms, when you drip irrigate your crops and keep your grains and produce fresh . . .  It’s even on your plate, when you eat the delicious cherry tomato. That too was perfected in Israel, in case you didn’t know.

The New York Times bureau chief in Israel, Jodi Rudoren, promptly echoed the Prime Minister:

Wikipedia (citing Jewish Week) says the most common modern species of cherry tomatoes was developed in Israel in 1973.

Ethan Bronner was Rudoren’s predecessor as New York Times Jerusalem bureau chief. He also parroted the Israeli claim, in 2010:
The Israeli government, deeply worried about the country’s declining international image, began a campaign on Wednesday to turn every Israeli — and ultimately every Jew — into a traveling public relations agent .  . .
One main message of the campaign is that Israel is a technically advanced and diverse society and that its government policies are not the source of regional conflict. It notes that a number of important agricultural breakthroughs have occurred here, including drip irrigation and the development of the cherry tomato.

Rudoren’s source was this Jewish Week hasbara tour of a science museum in Israel, cited in Wikipedia:

My guides explained the revolutionary nature of how Hazera Genetics, under the tutelage of two Hebrew University professors, developed a strain of the small tomatoes that ripened slowly, stayed fresh in shipment, turned the tomato into a commodity to be bought in clusters like grapes and brought untold millions of dollars into the Israeli treasury.

And look at this, the Israeli ministry of Foreign Affairs also brags on Hazera Genetics:

Israeli tomato expertise has become legendary worldwide. The cherry tomato was developed in Israel in 1973, and it was here that Israeli seed breeder Hazera Genetics launched the first tomato strain with immunity to a devastating virus . . .

As’ad AbuKhalil, the Angry Arab, found the claim risible back when Bronner made it. He quoted an agricultural professor:
“The Israelis claiming that they have developed the cherry tomato is completely unfounded. As a matter of fact, the ‘regular’ tomato itself was developed from cherry tomatoes as one parent, and reports of the existence of cherry tomatoes appear before 1948. While the Israelis have produced some popular varieties, most commercial varieties were developed somewhere else. The coveted Santorini variety of cherry tomatoes that Rami refers to is still only grown in Santorini-Greece and is largely unchanged. It is also thought that the Santorini originally came from somewhere in Egypt, so the Egyptians can claim that they are behind one of the most famous cherry tomato varieties. Other very popular varieties like Sweet 100 and derivatives have been developed in the US. North Carolina State University (especially R. Gardner), as well as the USDA have developed many varieties as well as the breeding lines that others (like those Israelis) use to develop new varieties. This claim, as with their other false claim that they have developed drip irrigation (which was ‘invented’ in the US), as Rami said, is their usual practice of taking something that they have not invented and slapping their name on it. Of course, as any self-deluding Lebanese knows, the act of claiming a non-existent achievement is itself a practice that the Israelis have stolen from the Lebanese.”

The first signs of cultivation have been reported in 1875. A certain fact is from that day to this, the variety has not changed at all, nor has it been grafted with another string.
The older population of the island maintain the first seeds arrived from the Suez. The Santorinian captains used to stop there for supplies, and after trying the tomatina, they brought the seeds back. The crops were of course successful due to the dry climates of both Egypt & Santorini.

The ‘baby tomato’ went so well, by the turn of the 20th century 20,000 acres were being harvested and 14 processing factories were in operation.

This Geek site supports the Israeli claim to improving the cherry tomato in the 1970s:

Haim Rabinowitch and Nachum Kedar, two Israeli academic researchers, genetically engineered the cherry tomato in 1973. Their goal was to produce a sturdier tomato variety that was easier to harvest, and their success paved the way for other Israeli scientists to introduce virus-resistant and dripless tomatoes.

Of course the real question is why the NYT bureau chief in Jerusalem sees his or her role as piping Israeli propaganda. As James North tweeted to Rudoren:

[email protected] Hadeel al-Haslamoun is murdered at a checkpoint in broad daylight and this is what you tweet about? #PalestinianLivesDoNotMatter

 

philweiss
About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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79 Responses

  1. ziusudra
    ziusudra
    October 2, 2015, 11:41 am

    We remember in the 50s when everything was invented in Russia!
    Well, i must say, i liked Jewish Celery Soda in the 40s in N.Y.
    No one can beat the Bagels on Long Island, but they’re now in the hands of the Italians. Orginally, they came from the Poles.
    Question: Does the cherry tomato give Netanyahu freedom to carry on his conquest?
    ziusudra

    • Froggy
      Froggy
      October 2, 2015, 1:00 pm

      ziusudra : “We remember in the 50s when everything was invented in Russia!”

      That was the first thing I thought of. -LOL- I mean… didn’t some dude named ‘Popov’ invent baseball?

      This kind of bragging makes the braggart look silly and trivial, and, if the person is claiming work that was done by others, deceitful and manipulative. When the truth comes out, as it always does, the lie is proof that the liars are mendacious.

      That said, I never found cherry tomatoes ‘delicious’. I prefer large, meaty tomatoes, preferably heirloom varieties.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        October 2, 2015, 4:55 pm

        Yeah, that is really the point: cherry tomatoes are odorless and tasteless decorative items.
        Even if invented by Zionists, they still are a PR item, not food.

      • amigo
        amigo
        October 3, 2015, 8:54 am

        “That said, I never found cherry tomatoes ‘delicious’. I prefer large, meaty tomatoes, preferably heirloom varieties. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/reporters-israeli-tomato#comment-799994” Froggy.

        As a long time avid gardener I grow several types of tomatoes in a 25 x 12 foot tunnel . These range from beefsteak to cherry tomatoes.My favorite is known as , black Russian aka chocolate cherry.These are the sweetest toms I have ever grown and when picked at the peak of ripeness are in my opinion unrivaled .

        I also grow a variey of beefsteak , known as marmande (a spanish variety) which are also unrivaled for taste and meatiness.Needless to say , home grown tomatoes are without question far far better than those tasteless anemic looking toms found on supermarket shelves.

        While tomatoes have minimal food value , any salad looks incomplete without a tomato included.

        Americans say tomay-to , we say tomato.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 4, 2015, 12:54 pm

        Amigo : I grow both eating tomatoes as well as cooking tomatoes, the Italian plum kind which we can and freeze to add to curries and stews throughout the year.

        (Have I mentioned that we live on a working farm and a cidrerie? Of course, our major crop is apples, though my teenage sons have added additional fruit trees in anticipation of diversifying the cidre.)

        As a farmer, it tears me apart when I read of the Palestinian olive trees burned and uprooted.

        About olive trees:

        “From seed, the first seven years is mostly unproductive. Seven to thirty years the tree grows with a constant increase in productivity. From thirty-five to one hundred and fifty the tree reaches maturity and is in full production. At one hundred and fifty years, the olive tree starts aging with a remarkable productivity for centuries, and sometimes for over a thousand years or more!

        http://mikpens.com/olive%20oil%20files/Cultivation%20and%20Care%20of%20the%20Greek%20Olive%20Tree.html

        As for irrigation : It’s rare that we need to irrigate in northern France and in the UK. When we do, we use ordinary plastic piping rather than emitters, or a kind of simple device that I invented which is designed to work on trees.

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod
        October 4, 2015, 1:23 pm

        Wow, Froggy!
        Stunning avatar.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 4, 2015, 2:46 pm

        Thank you. We live on the sea, so….

        I love that avatars are small and don’t show the tomato stains on the frock, the grey hair amongst the black, and the wrinkles fighting to get out. ;)

      • JennieS
        JennieS
        October 4, 2015, 12:38 am

        My 3 grandchildren adore Sweet 100 cherry tomatoes and descend like locusts on a fruiting bush. Fortunately this California developed hybrid is incredibly productive. Lie Froggy I prefer big meaty tomatoes 1 slice per sandwich and lovely fried.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 4, 2015, 1:22 pm

        ” I grow both eating tomatoes as well as cooking tomatoes,”

        Didn’t I read somewhere that tomatoes were, for a long time, considered to be poisonous? In fact, some guy had to go to the town square (in Italy someplace, maybe France?) and eat tomatoes and not die before people accepted them. Did I read that, or did I make it up?
        Makes me wonder how they convinced people to eat broccoli….

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod
        October 4, 2015, 1:52 pm

        I wandered deliriously in a desert once. Came across a stock pond. Milky green, warm, rodents, bees, moths, feathers and frog soup floating in it. Felt I had seconds before death, so I buried my face and drank deep. Surprising delicious. An hour or so later my guys found me. Not even an upset stomach. I’ve eaten everything I’ve seen since.

        Oh, the point: Shipwrecked sailors probably among greatest food discoverers/testers ever.

        Have I told this story before?
        I forget.
        I think there were side-effects.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 4, 2015, 2:51 pm

        You are right about the tomatoes. They were considered poisonous by the Americans.

        Broccolli is very good when slathered in garlic-infused olive oil, topped with grated Parmesan.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 4, 2015, 3:45 pm

        “Have I told this story before?

        I think so. You ended up with a bad sunburn

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 4, 2015, 5:03 pm

        Not this year I didn’t. :)

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        October 4, 2015, 7:19 pm

        People eat broccoli?

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 4, 2015, 8:16 pm

        People do. George Bush didn’t. ;)

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod
        October 4, 2015, 8:44 pm

        People, eat broccoli!

      • oldgeezer
        oldgeezer
        October 4, 2015, 7:28 pm

        @RoHta

        Eat what?

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 4, 2015, 8:15 pm

        “people eat broccoli?”

        You know, it was seeing a friend of mine eating asparagus which altered my whole conception of Man as Nature’s last word.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 1:33 am

        Do you eat vegetables at all? I have often thought that Americans see eating vegetables as being somehow un-American.

        (I love asparagus, as well as broccoli.)

        Of course, I’m no one to judge as the French eat just about anything. Even French children….

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        October 4, 2015, 11:14 pm

        “It’s rare that we need to irrigate in northern France and in the UK.”

        Irrigation is a big deal here in dry, dusty, Australia. But in the UK you only have to wait for five minutes and nature will take care of watering the crops.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 10:38 am

        RoHa : “Irrigation is a big deal here in dry, dusty, Australia. But in the UK you only have to wait for five minutes and nature will take care of watering the crops.”

        Not necessarily true anymore. This past June and early July was incredibly hot and DRY in both England and northern France. Little to no rain for well over a month. This was one of those years when we got the hoses out.

        Our neighbours in the village resorted to this-
        http://snappyliving.com/the-drip-bottle-irrigation-system/
        -to water their vegetable patch.

        We used to be able to rely on the rain in Brittany. Not anymore.

        Australia is quite dry, I remember.

      • amigo
        amigo
        October 5, 2015, 11:26 am

        “(Have I mentioned that we live on a working farm and a cidrerie? Of course, our major crop is apples, though my teenage sons have added additional fruit trees in anticipation of diversifying the cidre. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/reporters-israeli-tomato#comment-154741“. froggy.

        Better save some of that ” scrumpy ” for next weekend .I will be uncorking bottles of Guinness , (and no , the Israelis did not invent that , no matter what they claim) as we celebrate , (hopefully ) a win over the the French.Nothing personal , just business.I know most brits are in shock at the moment and we send our condolences and regrets.That is to say , we would have welcomed the opportunity to do what the “Wallabies ” did. Viva la Irlande.

        Thanks for the run down on the Olive tree and yes , zionist,s uprooting olive trees to replace them with pine trees is indeed obscene not to mention an insult to mother earth.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 12:22 pm

        Amigo : You should break out the Guinness and celebrate today!

        You Irishers won the BIG one. One of your guys bagged a Nobel Prize.

        @Amigo : “Better save some of that ” scrumpy ” for next weekend .I will be uncorking bottles of Guinness , (and no , the Israelis did not invent that , no matter what they claim) as we celebrate , (hopefully ) a win over the the French.Nothing personal , just business.I know most brits are in shock at the moment and we send our condolences and regrets.That is to say , we would have welcomed the opportunity to do what the “Wallabies ” did. Viva la Irlande.”

        Fair enough. The Irish are great. So were the Aussies. They played well and deserved to win. England were… erm… wet. But yeah, my poor husband and the boys are walking round with long faces. My Scottish-born daughter is a Scotland fan, and so is used to losing, poor thing.

        God only knows what Les Bleus will do. The French are so variable – wonderful one week, the worst the next.

        Anyway… Allez les Bleus !

      • amigo
        amigo
        October 5, 2015, 2:06 pm

        “You Irishers won the BIG one. One of your guys bagged a Nobel Prize. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/reporters-israeli-tomato#sthash.h9KkRNdt.dpuf” Froggy

        Jeez , don,t broadcast that too loud or the Israelis will be calling in the Irish Amb to Israel for a good dress down , for stealing their ” Nobels”. We Irish are only allowed to win Nobel Peace prizes as Israel has no interest in such time wasting nonsense.However , if there was a Nobel for conducting “Peace Processes” than Israel would top the list.

        In the spirit of good sportsmanship , best of luck this weekend.Normally , I would say , may the best team win but not in this case.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 4:22 pm

        Amigo : You are a very funny man.

        Now I’m putting my money on Ireland, but don’t tell anyone.

    • echinococcus
      echinococcus
      October 2, 2015, 1:08 pm

      ziusudra:

      Bagels on Long Island, but they’re now in the hands of the Italians. Orginally, they came from the Poles.

      Originally, those Jews came from the Poles, too –I doubt you can establish a difference. As for Italians making bagels, these guys aren’t Italian but American, their bagels aren’t bagels cause they ain’t boiled, and the Jewish bagels aren’t anymore either except in obscure California locations.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 2, 2015, 2:41 pm

        “Originally, those Jews came from the Poles, too –I doubt you can establish a difference.”

        Wait a minute. At this point, I think you are beginning to compare, so to speak, a bagel with a bialy.

    • piotr
      piotr
      October 3, 2015, 6:55 pm

      From what I know, Christian Poles do not claim bagels. Small breads are highly regional, the only type similar to bagels in my parts was a tiny, shiny ring with very crunchy texture (sushki in the Wiki link). In the south, Jews had bagels and Christian bakers had obwarzanki (singular obwarzanek) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bublik.

      Concerning flash drives, they were invented by Israelis, but this is basically a way to package flash memory, and flash memory was invented and developed by the Japanese, Toshiba company, and there is a large variety of different uses and interfaces. Without Japan, semiconductors would be very, very different, without Israel? Perhaps a bit different.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        October 3, 2015, 7:47 pm

        In that case, it’s a regression according to Wikipedia:

        In the 16th and first half of the 17th centuries, the bajgiel became a staple of the Polish national diet,[8] and a staple of the Slavic diet generally.[9] Its name derives from the Yiddish word ‘beygal’ from the German dialect word ‘beugel,’ meaning ‘ring’ or ‘bracelet.'[10]

  2. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    October 2, 2015, 12:03 pm

    The New York Bloody Times has been an echo chamber for the Israeli right wing for decades. Nothing new here. However great that you keep shining the Mondoweiss light on this phenomena that is decades old

  3. Mooser
    Mooser
    October 2, 2015, 12:07 pm

    “No one can beat the Bagels on Long Island, but they’re now in the hands of the Italians. Originally, they came from the Poles”

    I like you, man. Your prose induces a picaresque ethnic vertigo. These days, that’s hard to get. Anyway, I don’t think Dr. Brown ever revealed his religious preference. Or where he got his medical degree. Or his taste buds.

    Wiki: “Cel-Ray was so popular in the 1930s among New York City’s Jewish community that it earned the nickname “Jewish Champagne”.”

    • pabelmont
      pabelmont
      October 2, 2015, 12:32 pm

      As a newcoming visitor to NYC in 1959 I was amazed at the existence (and taste) of Celery Tonic. Never heard of it before. Loved it. Don’t use tonic any more. (Shocked, shocked, to find SodaStream machines in the homes of TWO friends recently.)

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 2, 2015, 12:46 pm

        And the sweet yet peppery taste of celery, formerly an ethnic ambrosia, turns to ashes in my mouth. There I was, thinking of real ethnic accomplishment and almost every state in the US had several brands of the swill! Can’t win. Just when I thought we really had something. And the thought that a lot of other people like that stuff is frightening, somehow.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        October 2, 2015, 6:19 pm

        Soda that tastes of [shudder] celery?

        Bleaugh!

        Time for me to start producing Vegemite Fizz.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        October 2, 2015, 7:43 pm

        Seems that RoHa correctly identified the taste without having tried it.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 3, 2015, 2:09 pm

        “Soda that tastes of [shudder] celery?”

        Well, it didn’t taste all that good, but had definite health benefits. Celery, of course, increases your celerity, which improves acceleration, sometimes by a lot.
        Of course, it took a lot of moxie to drink the stuff. People often used it as a chaser.

      • talknic
        talknic
        October 3, 2015, 2:13 pm

        @ “People often used it as a chaser” When they’re celerbrating something

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 6, 2015, 12:42 pm

        “When they’re celerbrating something”

        Yup something like drinking a whole bottle of Cel-Ray!

  4. eljay
    eljay
    October 2, 2015, 1:08 pm

    The Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gave a speech to the United Nations General Assembly yesterday and touted Israeli “perfection” of the cherry tomato …

    Well-known mob boss Giacomo “Jack” Tantipiedi (yonah shudders, then scoffs) gives a speech at a local town hall meeting and touts the high quality of his company’s cement. (“It’s not just the ingredients that make it strong – it’s the people!”)

    • echinococcus
      echinococcus
      October 3, 2015, 8:00 pm

      One more Hophmi pearl:

      …you’ve parroted Angry Arab’s completely disingenuous piece on Ethan Bronner’s 2010 article, which was about Diaspora Ministry efforts to give Israelis some information to counter misperceptions about Israel abroad,..

      The only thing he, misadvertently of course, forgets to mention is that he ministry in question is officially the *Propaganda and Diaspora Ministry.

      Not that I can read him, but that’s the kind of stuff that jumps at your eyes, as the French say.

  5. hophmi
    hophmi
    October 2, 2015, 1:45 pm

    Not a single claim you make here is accurate. Maybe you should do your research a little more carefully.

    First of all, Netanyahu didn’t claim that Israel “invented” the cherry tomato. He said the cherry tomato was “perfected” in Israel. Nothing you’ve posted here undermines that claim. Second, you’ve parroted Angry Arab’s completely disingenuous piece on Ethan Bronner’s 2010 article, which was about Diaspora Ministry efforts to give Israelis some information to counter misperceptions about Israel abroad, and not about Israeli genetic engineering or inventing: “One main message of the campaign is that Israel is a technically advanced and diverse society and that its government policies are not the source of regional conflict. It notes that a number of important agricultural breakthroughs have occurred here, including drip irrigation and the development of the cherry tomato.”

    Bronner wasn’t “parroting” anything. He was simply reporting on the claims of the Israeli government’s campaign, in a mostly negative article that extensively quoted Shlomo Avineri’s criticism of the campaign as “puerile” and displaying a “Bolshevik mentality.” The claim, by the way, isn’t inaccurate either; Israeli innovation has contributed mightily to the development of both drip irrigation and the cherry tomato. Claiming to have developed a technology or a product is not the same thing as claiming to have invented it. If I invent a bicycle, and I sell my idea to Schwinn, and they create my idea, they’ve developed the bicycle that I invented.

    Drip irrigation was not invented in the United States; Angry Arab is incorrect about that too. It has been used in some form since ancient times and was probably invented by the Chinese. The main Israeli development was the use of a plastic emitter, which allowed water to be carried through long passageways and overcame the clogging and cost problems that plagued earlier systems. The Blass emitter was patented by Symcha Blass, an Israeli hydraulics engineer, in conjunction with Kibbutz Harzerim in 1959. It is this system, which greatly lowered the cost of the technology and utilized the cheap plastics that became available in the 20th century, that spread all over the world, and it is why Blass is credited with the discovery of micro-irrigation, or modern drip irrigation, today.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drip_irrigation#History
    http://www.gardenguides.com/79735-history-drip-irrigation.html
    http://www.allianceforwaterefficiency.org/Drip_and_Micro-Spray_Irrigation_Introduction.aspx

    As far as the cherry tomato, Hazera Genetics created a GMO version that doesn’t rot in shipment and that is a best seller around the world; it’s one of many varieties of tomato that they’ve created. That’s what Netanyahu was talking about. Here’s an article from the LA Times that is original reporting and is not based on any article from the Jewish Week, not that anything is wrong with the Jewish Week’s reporting, which is generally excellent.

    http://articles.latimes.com/2010/may/28/world/la-fg-israel-crops-20100529

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      October 2, 2015, 2:08 pm

      “Not a single claim…/…. which is generally excellent.”

      Gee, maybe they should put a warning label on the Dr. Brown’s: “Caution! More then one bottle may cause logorrhea or scribenzi furiouso combined with acute spasms of point-evasion.”

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      October 2, 2015, 3:28 pm

      Nazi Germany is credited with inventing tons of stuff; so much so US & USSR competed for German scientists even before Germany surrendered. This should be pointed every time Israel brags about being the innovative nation.

      • Antidote
        Antidote
        October 3, 2015, 8:44 am

        “Nazi Germany is credited with inventing tons of stuff; so much so US & USSR competed for German scientists even before Germany surrendered. This should be pointed every time Israel brags about being the innovative nation.”

        Nobody brags more about being “the innovative nation” than the US.. Should the Nazi analogy be pointed out to the US as well? Besides, competition regarding the status of most “innovative nation” already played a very prominent role in the decades leading up to WW I. One major reason why Imperial Germany had to be destroyed

    • John Fearey
      John Fearey
      October 2, 2015, 3:54 pm

      This is very helpful info. Now I have another product to boycott. Thanks.

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      October 2, 2015, 6:26 pm

      Yeah? Well we invented the cardboard wine cask, the stump-jump plough, and the Tim-Tam biscuit. So tell those abos to stop grousing.

      • annie
        annie
        October 2, 2015, 6:42 pm

        who could forget veggiemite! tripe yuk!

      • Kay24
        Kay24
        October 2, 2015, 7:53 pm

        My Aussie nephew always carried Vegemite with him when he traveled abroad. I am not a Vegemite fan, but love Marmite with bread and butter. :))

    • talknic
      talknic
      October 2, 2015, 6:58 pm

      @ hophmi “Not a single claim ..” … Netanyahu made has any legal bearing on Israeli’s ongoing intransigence in non-Israeli territories, which is the only reason Israel has any UN/UNGA/UNSC resolutions against it.

      IOW he’s a cheap lying creep

    • Marnie
      Marnie
      October 3, 2015, 12:00 am

      “As far as the cherry tomato, Hazera Genetics created a GMO version that doesn’t rot in shipment and that is a best seller around the world; it’s one of many varieties of tomato that they’ve created.”

      Wonder of wonders. Maybe Hazera Genetics should concentrate on creating a Netanyahu, et al., that also doesn’t rot in shipment?

      • John O
        John O
        October 3, 2015, 11:37 am

        Now that made me laugh out loud. Thanks, Marnie.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 1:36 am

        “As far as the cherry tomato, Hazera Genetics created a GMO version that doesn’t rot in shipment and that is a best seller around the world; it’s one of many varieties of tomato that they’ve created.”

        Like Twinkies! They don’t rot, and are a best seller.

    • ziusudra
      ziusudra
      October 3, 2015, 4:14 am

      Greetings hophmi,
      You see the flower pots hanging on the outside walls of homes in Spains? It was the Sarazens that delveloped it after 711AD.
      You don’t get de flower pot this time.
      ziusudra

      • hophmi
        hophmi
        October 4, 2015, 9:16 pm

        Thanks, all, for admitting that you were wrong, and for childishly changing the subject.

        As usual, you’ve shown that you’ll lie and lie even about a small thing like this. That’s how much you guys are motivated by hate. So very sad.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 5, 2015, 2:53 am

        My great-great-grandfather used old discarded firehoses to drip irrigate his saplings. He simply poked holes in hoses, and his system worked beautifully

        This was around 1900. Holes in piping or hose don’t clog if the diameter of the hole is large enough.

        I admit that holey hoses aren’t a very precise way of distributing water. However, this low-tech, rather archaic system works fine for delivering water to our trees during our very infrequent dry spells, and old hoses don’t kink like Netafim do. Nor do I have emitters to clog. (ALL emitters clog, including Netafim.)

        My ancestor didn’t invent drip irrigation though. According to Wikipedia:

        ‘Primitive drip irrigation has been used since ancient times. Fan Sheng-Chih Shu, written in China during the first century BCE, describes the use of buried, unglazed clay pots filled with water as a means of irrigation. Modern drip irrigation began its development in Germany in 1860 when researchers began experimenting with subsurface irrigation using clay pipe to create combination irrigation and drainage systems. Research was later expanded in the 1920s to include the application of perforated pipe systems. The usage of plastic to hold and distribute water in drip irrigation was later developed in Australia by Hannis Thill.”

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drip_irrigation

        Thank This Jew For Inventing Drip Irrigation
        http://thejewniverse.com/2015/thank-this-jew-for-inventing-drip-irrigation/

        ~LOL~ Israel is only one of many nationalities over the centuries that have contributed to the many types of drip irrigation.

    • talknic
      talknic
      October 5, 2015, 2:10 am

      @ hophmi “First of all, Netanyahu didn’t claim that Israel “invented” the cherry tomato. He said the cherry tomato was “perfected” in Israel”

      Turned from a delicious juicy food stuff into a hard skinned, tasteless, tomato red, lump of pulp is hardly ‘perfected’

  6. talknic
    talknic
    October 2, 2015, 2:56 pm

    None of Netayahu’s cherry (tomato) pickin’ claims have any legal bearing. Israel is in breach of International Law.

  7. Citizen
    Citizen
    October 2, 2015, 3:23 pm

    Israel did not develop the cherry tomato or drip irrigation, but it did develop refinement in suppressing locals https://electronicintifada.net/content/how-does-israel-get-away-it/14882
    That is a big key to Israel’s market power these days, e.g., turning Ferguson population into Palestinians.

  8. Abdul-Rahman
    Abdul-Rahman
    October 2, 2015, 3:54 pm

    Oh the Zionist propaganda on the cherry tomato! The only one that is probably more ridiculous then that is their false claim to have supposedly been involved with ‘inventing’ the cell phone: Google Martin Cooper on that.

    I’m not sure what ‘point’ the hasbara agents are trying to make with these “we are superior!” claims; based, for the most part, on lies, distortions and exaggerations of alleged inventions and achievements. Germany developed and invented a lot of things during Nazi rule, actual German inventions as opposed to these Zionist fibs and fairy tales. Does anyone seriously think that somehow lessens or makes the Nazis any less criminal in any way whatsoever??

    • lysias
      lysias
      October 2, 2015, 4:03 pm

      During the last years of Stalinism in Russia, there were claims that all sorts of things had been invented there.

  9. JWalters
    JWalters
    October 2, 2015, 5:57 pm

    Israel must also get credit for its great strides, made in collaboration with the New York Times, in crushing the truth and democracy!

  10. Kay24
    Kay24
    October 2, 2015, 8:00 pm

    So after all that chest thumping and weird moment of silence, is this Netanyahu admitting defeat? He made is very difficult for all, and now must make nice (or else how to get more aid and weapons?)

    New York – Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu informed the U.S. administration that his speech on Thursday at the UN General Assembly, in which he dealt extensively with the nuclear deal between Iran and six world powers, would be his swan song on his public fight against the accord, senior American officials told…
    read more: http://www.haaretz.com/news/diplomacy-defense/.premium-1.678577

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      October 2, 2015, 9:29 pm

      “Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu informed the U.S. administration that his speech on Thursday … would be his swan song on his public fight against the accord”

      He’s going to shut up about it? Oh, please!

    • Marnie
      Marnie
      October 3, 2015, 12:02 am

      So Masada 2.0 is on the horizon? Hopefully he’ll just take his wife and his cabinet with him……

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod
        October 3, 2015, 10:21 am

        Based on the evidence…the hard written and video evidence…it appears there is a good list of the people who pose an immediate existential threat to humanity.
        Now, should Iz apply their own standards…to their terror minded leaders?

  11. Ellen
    Ellen
    October 2, 2015, 9:38 pm

    Developing a strain of the cherry tomato is not a big deal. If the tasteless variety sold in stores is the strain developed by the Israeli Ag industry, it is “perfected” for commerce, but not as a quality food.

    Strains of fruits are developed and propagated all the time. It is NOT rocket science. And surely nothing to be bragging about at the UN — doing so makes Netanyahoo look as pathetic as he is.

    And it is irrelevant. Lots of good things happen to come from citizens of bad regimes. East Germany under Hoeneker gave us breakthroughs in geo thermal energy. The Nazis did terrible terrible science, but they also did some excellent stuff we benefit from today. Aspirin, for one.

    Back to cheery tomatoes. Here is a new strain that can grow in sub artic conditions.
    http://www.rareseeds.com/sub-arctic-plenty-or-world-s-earliest-tomato/

    That Rudoren even gives this stuff on Israeli Cherry tomatoes copy is embarrassing.

    • lysias
      lysias
      October 2, 2015, 10:03 pm

      Aspirin, although very much German, is very much pre-Nazi:

      Felix Hoffmann, a chemist at Bayer, is credited with the synthesis of aspirin in 1897, though whether this was of his own initiative or under the direction of Arthur Eichengrün is controversial.

      By the way, Eichengrün was a German Jew.

      • Ellen
        Ellen
        October 2, 2015, 11:45 pm

        Lysis, Thanks. Right. Poorly thought through example. Ok, another invention/breakthrough under the Nazi Regime. Werner Fossman’s who did the first cardiac catherization (on himself), which was to revolutionize cardiac diagnostics and treatment to this day.

        I do not know what God or Book he identified with, but like many or most all in any government University position of the time, he was a member of THE Party….

        But he was fired for experimenting on himself and lost his professional license and any possibility of practicing medicine. Then when he was wasting away in a POW camp, his paper on the procedure was read in Chicago. …..

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        October 4, 2015, 2:53 pm

        Well if aspirin isn’t strong enough, I believe it was at Bayer that heroin was first refined from a morphine base.

      • lysias
        lysias
        October 6, 2015, 9:48 am

        Yes, heroin was first produced at Bayer, and by the same Felix Hoffmann.

      • CigarGod
        CigarGod
        October 6, 2015, 9:55 am

        I seem to recall that aspirin was derived from the inner bark of Aspen tree.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 6, 2015, 10:59 am

        CigarGod : Aspirin is acetylsalicylic acid is derived from the inner bark of the white willow tree (salix) which contains salicin.

      • lysias
        lysias
        October 6, 2015, 11:24 am

        Salicylic acid is present in the bark of certain plants. What was produced at Bayer was acetylsalicylic acid, or aspirin, a synthetically altered version, which causes less digestive upset than salicylic acid.

      • Froggy
        Froggy
        October 6, 2015, 11:32 am

        Lysias : That is true.

        Arthur Eichengrün was an impressive man.

  12. CigarGod
    CigarGod
    October 3, 2015, 9:27 am

    Well, Israel has surely embraced and “perfected” the prosperity religion ideology of a broad swath of the USA evangelical movement.
    The longer the list of stolen…I mean “perfected” inventions, the greater the justification for denying Palestine equal rights.

  13. sherban
    sherban
    October 3, 2015, 12:05 pm

    Others Israel great inventions are well known humus and thina and the music hora which is popular music in Israel and Romania( how Romanian people began to dance hora in thr same time with Israeli people !)?What about the Israel anthem which sound like a Smetana piece

  14. Ossinev
    Ossinev
    October 5, 2015, 3:34 pm

    Shame that Nitay was just cherry picking and didn`t allocate say around a further 44 seconds to include all those other Zionist inventions or” developments” which may have included all time greats like the disposable nappy,the flush toilet and the portaloo.

    Surely there must be a definitive list held in Hasbara Central to be wheeled out at appropriate times. I look forward to seeing it.

    Amigo – congratulations on a stout defence of the Irish invention of Guinness.Got in there just in time my friend.

  15. amigo
    amigo
    October 6, 2015, 8:36 am

    “Amigo – congratulations on a stout defence of the Irish invention of Guinness.Got in there just in time my friend. – See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2015/10/reporters-israeli-tomato#comment-800729” Ossinev.

    We Irish also invented the toilet seat.Then the British came along and “Perfected” it by putting a hole in it.Some people view it as one of our crappiest inventions.

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