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Anti-Semitism and white supremacy

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The epithet of anti-Semitism is being hurled fairly loosely these days whether it be Trump’s characterization of Congresswomen Omar and Tlaib’s policies or the State Department’s expansive definition of anti-Semitism as criticism of Israel or comparison of Israel to Nazi Germany (a comparison that has been made by a number of Israeli thinkers), or the local and national efforts to label the Boycott, Divestment, and Sanction movement of Israel inherently anti-Semitic.

So how can we calmly and thoughtfully think about this swirling controversy? Most people recognize classic anti-Semitism, the Christianity’s Jews-killed-Christ, Shakespeare’s Shylock, Nazi-graffiti-scrawled-on-a- synagogue types. Most people, (except those in the growing white supremacist, neo-Nazi movements), agree that these acts and beliefs are horrific and dangerous to a democratic society that aspires to tolerance and respect for minorities, whether it be the 7 million Jews, 3 ½ million Muslims, or 11 million Mexican immigrants among us, for starters.

I would like to explore the recent phenomenon, which is fracturing the American Jewish community, of equating criticism of Israel with anti-Semitism, and the easily recognized and intrinsically linked relationship between a growing hatred of Jews and the public explosion of white supremacy in our country.

In the first half of the 20th century, the work of the Zionist movement to establish an exclusive Jewish state (in Uganda? Australia? Palestine?) was highly controversial, and only became a reality through a confluence of factors including the Christian Zionism of colonial British leaders, the appalling consequences of the Nazi Holocaust, and the UN’s attempts to address the desperate needs of postwar European Jewish refugees who were not welcomed in other countries. The underlying racism that allowed European Jewish trauma, aspirations, and history to be privileged at the expense of the indigenous population in Palestine was rarely acknowledged, or else justified in the name of Jewish survival. At the same time, the understanding that people who had lived in Historic Palestine for centuries, and their neighboring Arab brothers and sisters, would not peacefully relinquish land they felt was theirs, was defined as Jew-hatred rather than opposition to what is now understood to be settler colonialism. Zionism was sold as a redemptive Jewish liberation movement building a new and just society for a battered people in their ancestral lands. Palestinians were rendered invisible.

In 1974 the Anti-Defamation League (once a progressive group focused on exposing bigotry and intolerance towards Jews) defined the “new anti-Semitism” as criticism of Israel. Eight years later, after Israel’s disastrous invasion of Lebanon and the massacres in Sabra and Shatila, the Israeli government and a variety of think tanks and PR groups turned their attention to improving Israel’s image in the world (but not, I might add, its conduct on the ground). In 1984 the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) issued a college guide exposing what they saw as a dangerous anti-Israel campaign on campuses which was grounded in the idea that Israel was always the victim and criticism of Israeli policies, inherently anti-Semitic.

This McCarthyism crept into Jewish institutions and the epithet of anti-Semite was used freely to silence and demonize critical voices. Israel created Ministries of Public Diplomacy, Diaspora Affairs, and Strategic Affairs that work with “front groups” in the US, and a host of generously funded Jewish Federations and groups like the Israel Action network, Hillel, StandWithUs, Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in American (CAMERA), Canary Mission, AMCHA Initiative, Israel Project, Israel on Campus, Israellycool, ACT.IL-Online community for Israel, etc., sprang into action. Today they provide “alternative” and cherrypicked “historical facts,” slick propaganda YouTube’s, websites, and apps, compile dossiers to blacklist and smear activists as anti-Semites and terrorists, threaten universities and public events, and work hard to keep Congress in line.

I review this history to show that attitudes do not happen by accident, and today they are magnified by the explosive power of social media which promotes a host of misinformation and conspiracy theories and encourages people to live in their own private echo chambers. Viewpoints are shaped by propaganda and belief systems- religious Jews yearn for the Messiah and some 60 million Christian Zionists await the Rapture. Both require that Jews “return” to Zion, albeit for very opposite reasons. Fears are easily framed and manipulated. There is rising anti-Semitism fueled by a deranged president and the growth of a bigoted white nationalist alt-right that hates Jews, women, black and brown people, Muslims, immigrants, LGBTQI; anyone not part of their vision of an Aryan nation of armed, white, heterosexual men. Thus we see the bizarre phenomenon of neo-Nazis disparaging Jews while expressing admiration for the State of Israel, a good place to sequester these undesirables and at the same time, an admirable example of a powerful, well-armed state, grounded in ethnic purity, eager to do battle with Muslims in general and Iranians in particular.

Obviously, Jews are a diverse group of people; undivided support for the policies of Israel are seen largely in older generations and mainstream institutions. Jewish youth are much less attached to the country and its mythology, hence the frantic public relations activities on US colleges and Birthright Programs. Jews from Eastern Europe have a very different experience than Jews of color who often experience double discrimination. Israel is a contradictory place. It claims to be a democracy while passing a Nation State Law that officially legalizes Jewish privilege. It receives $3.8 billion in military aid per year from the the US and extensive political cover, exports massive amounts of military surveillance and technology to repressive regimes, while having magnificent orchestras, brilliant writers, scientific institutions, world class medical facilities, and historic religious centers. At the same time, the country is guilty of major violations of human rights and international law, the ruthless incarceration of Palestinian children, and a brutal 50+ year occupation. I fully support the right of oppressed people to resist their oppression and I am appalled by sporadic Palestinian violent resistance and its consequences for Israelis. I am even more appalled, however, by the indiscriminate and disproportionate violence of Israeli forces and settlers that have made life unlivable every day for almost five million people under their control. Not only do we taxpayers make this all possible, but it is our democratic right to call out injustice when and where we see it.

Denunciations of anti-Semitism must be credibly nested within opposition to white nationalism and the racism and Islamophobia that are its lifeblood. If we do not distinguish between valid critiques of the policies of the Israeli state and anti-Semitism, we are allowing rightwing forces to weaponize anti-Semitism, suppressing freedom of speech and open debate, and making the term, anti-Semitism, ultimately meaningless at a time when it is critical to identify and oppose it.

My mother used to walk by a sign at a park in Brooklyn, NY, that read: NO JEWS OR DOGS ALLOWED. That was anti-Semitism. My call for an end to the occupation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem, the siege of Gaza, and the racist policies of the Israeli government towards its Palestinian citizens, is not. The hysteria this discussion provokes is a mark of Jewish fragility not strength.

Alice Rothchild

Alice Rothchild is a physician, author, and filmmaker who has focused her interest in human rights and social justice on the Israel/Palestine conflict since 1997. She practiced ob-gyn for almost 40 years. Until her retirement she served as Assistant Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Harvard Medical School. She writes and lectures widely, is the author of Broken Promises, Broken Dreams: Stories of Jewish and Palestinian Trauma and Resilience, On the Brink: Israel and Palestine on the Eve of the 2014 Gaza Invasion, and Condition Critical: Life and Death in Israel/Palestine. She directed a documentary film, Voices Across the Divide and is active in Jewish Voice for Peace. Follow her at @alicerothchild

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62 Responses

  1. Joshua Laskin on August 25, 2019, 8:00 pm

    I’m not so troubled by White-identism. I think it’s ok if some Jews do Jew-identism, some Blacks do Black-identism, some Southerners do South-identism, etc. The American Idea contains this freedom, to do your own tribal thing. Let’s just stay out of each others’ way. If some monuments offend me, that’s the price of my own tribal monuments’ allowance of offence to others. Let’s all try not to focus on what we find annoying. After all, isn’t this what we want to see, in Canaan? Different identity-groups, sharing the same Land which they all love; staying out of each others’ ways; overlooking the annoyances? And, of course, the same set of rules applying to everyone; with each tribe pulling its own weight. It’s not clear to me that White-identists don’t feel conspired against, and aren’t simply seeking a fair shake, to be who they see they’ve been. Whites have the same right to be annoying, as do the rest of us. If some enjoy torch-hiking ’round General Lee; it may not be my personal cup of tea; but, that’s my problem. We’re all bozos on this America-bound bus.

    • johneill on August 26, 2019, 1:02 am

      there’s a specific group that ‘white identists’ think is conspiring against them – but better let them keep their antisemitism because we’re all flawed.

    • Carlo on August 26, 2019, 1:23 pm

      It’s not simply a matter of people ‘doing their own tribal thing’ – the problem is where the power lies.
      When an oppressed or discrimimated-against group demonstrates, it’s usually to draw attention to inequality or injustice.
      When the dominant group in a society parades through the streets it’s an affirmation of their strength and a message to the oppressed groups to limit their expectations.

      • Sibiriak on August 26, 2019, 2:34 pm

        When the dominant group in a society parades through the streets it’s an affirmation of their strength …
        ——————————————————————————————

        Yeah, when the .1% goes on parade, its a sight to behold!

    • bcg on August 26, 2019, 2:08 pm

      @Joshua Laskin: Good lord. The white “identitarians” don’t want to live in peace with other cultures, they want to expel them from America or, at best, give a few states to the Jews, African-Americans, Latinos and other sub-humans.

    • Mooser on August 26, 2019, 2:54 pm

      It’s been a bad couple of weeks for baked goods. Still, watching them crumble into half-baked crackers is never pleasant.

      • Citizen on August 27, 2019, 6:23 am

        Holy Matzo!

      • Mooser on August 27, 2019, 3:41 pm

        Don’t you see? Having, by our hard work and innate intelligence, thoroughly assimilated into American society, we are entitled to all the bigotry attached thereunto.

      • RoHa on August 27, 2019, 10:40 pm

        That seems fair, Mooser.

      • Mooser on August 28, 2019, 11:26 am

        “That seems fair, Mooser.”

        Hey, that’s the way the matzoh crumbles.

  2. Bumblebye on August 25, 2019, 8:14 pm

    After massive bombing sorties over airports in Aleppo last night (claiming the *potential* of drones over israel), tonight israel is bombing the Bekaa Valley in Lebanon – after Nasrallah made a threatening speech. Undoubtedly, Gaza will be bombed very shortly as 3 rockets were fired from the strip (the info on the Gaza rockets popped up on an alt-right fb profile – they salivate over israel’s bombings of Palestinians).

  3. RoHa on August 26, 2019, 12:28 am

    “My mother used to walk by a sign at a park in Brooklyn, NY, that read: NO JEWS OR DOGS ALLOWED.”

    From what I have read, there were, in fact, no such signs. But perhaps the evidence remains to be found.

    The idea seems to have been based on the story of the “No dogs or Chinese allowed” sign in Huangpu Park in Shanghai. The actual sign outside the park did not say that in so many words., and it seems that Amahs, at least,were permitted.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huangpu_Park

    • dsowd on August 26, 2019, 10:06 am
    • Mooser on August 26, 2019, 3:23 pm

      Well, I looked it up on Google, and dogs, no matter what their religion, are welcome in many Brooklyn parks these days.

      • RoHa on August 26, 2019, 9:45 pm

        Very liberal. But aren’t you supposed to call them “Canine Americans” these days?

      • Mooser on August 30, 2019, 2:38 pm

        “But aren’t you supposed to call them “Canine Americans” these days?”

        That’s a good idea, but I’ll stick with the good old “Person’s best friend”. Political correctness doesn’t intimidate me!

    • Keith on August 27, 2019, 6:59 pm

      ROHA- “From what I have read, there were, in fact, no such signs.”

      Perhaps not, but it makes a nice story, doesn’t it? One anecdotal story, true or not, and the need to provide hard statistical evidence of victimhood disappears. On a somewhat relevant aside, I recently read that getting shot by police is a leading cause of death for black men in the US. (Seattle Times, 8/17/19) Surely, there is a lesson there somewhere?

  4. Peter in SF on August 26, 2019, 3:59 am

    I was looking in this article for the author’s definition of anti-Semitism, but the best I could find was this:

    Most people recognize classic anti-Semitism, the Christianity’s Jews-killed-Christ, Shakespeare’s Shylock, Nazi-graffiti-scrawled-on-a- synagogue types.

    Does Jew-hatred exist in the Arab world? Yes, but it doesn’t take these “classic” forms. Here is an excerpt of an article from the same author on Mondoweiss last year ( https://mondoweiss.net/2018/10/shunned/ ) about Mufti Amin al-Husseini:

    It is unclear how much of his political activities were grounded in Arab nationalism and anti-colonialism, and how much in anti-Semitism. The Arab nationalism and anti-colonialism are understandable responses to the British Empire and Jewish settlement in Palestine; the anti-Semitism is unforgivable.

    Unforgivable if the Mufti had some views about Jews as Christ-killers, as Shakespeare’s Shylock, as Nazi graffiti scrawled on a synagogue? I really don’t think those were part of his cultural baggage.

    The present article refers to “the growing white supremacist, neo-Nazi movements” and “a growing hatred of Jews”. How do you know these are growing? Or more to the point, why don’t you tell us what evidence you have that they are growing?

    You rightfully point out how AIPAC and other Jewish institutions started disinformation campaigns in which “the epithet of anti-Semite was used freely to silence and demonize critical voices.” The average American looks at them and thinks “Well, they’re Jews, so I expect them to defend Israel.” You might object to that attitude and may even consider it anti-Semitic in a way, but it is what it is. It is much more concerning that the Speaker of the House, a representative of the famously “liberal” city of San Francisco, went to AIPAC this year and said:

    We must also be vigilant against bigoted or dangerous ideologies masquerading as policy, and that includes BDS.

    https://www.speaker.gov/newsroom/32619/
    What does Nancy Pelosi mean when she calls BDS “bigoted”? By her logic, clearly, it is bigoted because it is anti-Semitic. This is exactly the misuse of the anti-Semitism label that your article is about, but it’s not coming from a Jewish person or organization.

    You write:

    Denunciations of anti-Semitism must be credibly nested within opposition to white nationalism and the racism and Islamophobia that are its lifeblood.

    The irony is that denunciations of anti-Semitism are often coupled with appeals to racism and Islamophobia. Just look at what Pam Geller does.
    But I would also argue that a lot of denunciations of anti-Semitism have actually assumed white superiority: since anti-Semitism from its original coinage is the view that Jews are a race that is not indigenous to Europe and therefore don’t deserve the same rights as white people, those who have denounced anti-Semitism have been insisting that Jews do deserve the same rights as white people.

  5. Misterioso on August 26, 2019, 11:18 am

    Regarding Jewish refugees:

    “In 1938, a thirty-one nation conference was held in Evian, France, on resettlement of the victims of Nazism. The World Zionist Organization refused to participate, fearing that resettlement of Jews in other states would reduce the number available for Palestine.” (John Quigley, Palestine and Israel: A Challenge to Justice, as quoted in “The Origin of the Palestine-Israel Conflict,” second edition, published by Jews for Justice in the Middle East, Berkeley, California, p. 21.)

    On 7 December 1938, during a meeting of the Mapai Central Committee (precursor of the Labour Party), David Ben-Gurion revealed his true feelings regarding the plight of German Jews: “If I knew it was possible to save all the [Jewish] children in Germany by transporting them to England, but only half of them by transporting them to Palestine, I would choose the second…” He attempted to explain his twisted reasoning by adding that he would make such a choice “…because we face not only the reckoning of those children, but the historical reckoning of the Jewish people.” Ben-Gurion also expressed his fear that “‘the human conscience’ might bring various countries to open their doors to Jewish refugees from Germany. He saw this as a threat and warned: ‘Zionism is in danger!'” (Tom Segev, The Seventh Million, Hill and Wang, New York, 1994, p. 28.)

    On 27 November 1942, the Yishuv newspaper Davar published an article that referred to the extermination of European Jews as “‘punishment from heaven’ for not having come to Palestine.” (Tom Segev, p. 98). As Ben-Gurion so callously put it on 8 December 1942, during a Mapai meeting: “‘They did not want to listen to us’ ….in their deaths they had sabotaged the Zionist dream.’” (David Ben-Gurion at a gathering of Mapai workers, 8 Dec. 1942; quoted by Tom Segev)

    That saving Jews from the Nazis was not the priority of American Zionists was clearly shown during the war. When President Roosevelt became aware of the dire circumstances of European Jews (who were thought at the time to be about 80% of the total number of refugees), he sent his close friend Morris Ernst (a key member of the Democratic party and leader of the New York Jewish community) to London during the middle of the war to see if England and the Commonwealth would join the United States and other countries in taking in a half million Jewish refugees through a generous worldwide policy of political asylum once Hitler was defeated. Roosevelt felt he could sell the plan to the American Congress if Britain agreed.

    Ernst returned home jubilant and advised the President that Britain agreed to “match the United States up to 150,000.” Roosevelt replied:”150,000 to England – 150,000 to match that in the United States – pick up 200,000 or 300,000 elsewhere, and we can start with half a million of these oppressed people.” One week later, however, the President informed Ernst that the program had to be abandoned because “…the dominant vocal Jewish leadership of America won’t stand for it…the Zionist movement knows [that it] can raise vast sums for Palestine by saying to donors, `There is no other place this poor Jew can go.'”

    Ernst refused to believe Roosevelt and went about seeking the support of American Jews for the plan. Their response shocked him: “I was thrown out of parlours of friends of mine who very frankly said, `Morris, this is treason. You are undermining the Zionist movement’. [I found] a deep genuine, often fanatically emotional vested interest in putting over the [movement in men] who are little concerned about human blood if it is not their own.” (Morris Ernst, So Far So Good, Harper & Brothers: New York, 1948, pp. 172-177)

    In 1947, Representative William G. Stratton introduced a bill to the Congress aimed primarily at Jewish refugees which would have admitted up to 400,000 displaced persons of all faiths into the United States. Shamefully, however, the Stratton Bill never got past hearings of the House Foreign Affairs Committee because it was ignored by the Zionist lobby which wanted nothing to interfere with the flow of Jews into Palestine.

    The Yiddish Bulletin wrote: “…by insisting that Jewish D.P.’s do not wish to go to any country outside of Israel; by not participating in the negotiations on behalf of the D.P.’s; and by refraining from a campaign of their own – by all this they [the Zionists] certainly did not help to open the gates of America for Jews. In fact, they sacrificed the interests of living people – their brothers and sisters who went through a world of pain – to the politics of their own movement.” (Yiddish Bulletin, Free Jewish Club, May 19, 1950)

    The Zionists made it very clear to Truman that their backing would only be forthcoming if he did not impede their efforts to take possession of Palestine by allowing European Jewish refugees to immigrate to the United States. “…an aide sympathetic to Zionism [advised Truman] not to offer haven to Jewish displaced persons in the United States as this would dilute the argument that an independent Jewish state was required to absorb them.” (Prof. Charles Smith, Palestine And The Arab Israel Conflict, p. 128)

    Ben-Gurion and the Jewish Agency were preventing European Jews who had sought temporary sanctuary in Palestine during the war from returning to their homes. Britain was well aware of this and Lord Halifax, British Ambassador to the United States made a point of informing Secretary of State Byrnes “that the Zionists were using every possible form of intimidation to stop Jews from leaving Palestine to go back to Europe and play their part in its reconstruction.” (FR: 1945, Vol. Vlll p. 775; cited by Lilienthal, The Zionist Connection, p. 52)
    Some American Jews publicly criticized the Zionists for using their influence to prevent the admission of Jewish refugees into the United States. Among them was Arthur Sulzberger, publisher of the New York Times who called for a reversal of Zionist policy that put statehood first, refugees last: “Admitting that the Jews of Europe have suffered beyond expression, why in God’s name should the fate of all these unhappy people be subordinated to the single cry of Statehood? I cannot rid myself of the feeling that the unfortunate Jews of Europe’s D.P. [Displaced Persons] camps are helpless hostages for whom statehood has been made the only ransom.” (New York Times, October 27, 1946; quoted by Lilienthal, What Price Israel?, p. 37)

    On 2 May 1948, in a report delivered to the pro-Zionist American Jewish Conference regarding “Jewish Displaced Persons in the American Occupied Zone of Germany,” Jewish Chaplain Klausner, a dedicated Zionist, stated that “The Jews as a group are not overwhelmingly desirous of going to Palestine…we may predict that perhaps 30% of the people will go to Palestine.” (Lilienthal, WPI? p. 260)

    Klausner concluded that the displaced Jews “… must be forced to go to Palestine…. By ‘force’ I suggest a program. It is not a new program. It was used before, and most recently. It was used in the evacuation of the Jews from Poland and in the story of [the refugee ship] the `Exodus’.” Klausner went on to explain what his “program” would involve: “The first step…is the adoption of the principle that it is the conviction of the world Jewish community that these people must go to Palestine. The second step is the transmittal of that policy to the Displaced Persons. The third step is for the world Jewish community to offer the people the opportunity to go to Palestine….”

    The strategy suggested by Klausner to persuade Jews in the Displaced Persons camps to immigrate to Israel was implemented. Its tactics included: “confiscation of food rations, dismissal from work, smashing of machines sent by Americans to train D.P.’s in useful skills, taking away legal protection and visa rights from dissenters, expulsion from the camps of political opponents and, in one instance, even the public flogging of a recalcitrant recruit for the Israel Army. Trucks of the Jewish Agency were known to drive through the Jewish camps in Germany, ‘picking up’ boys and young men. Strange transports left Germany every week for France where, as a first step en route to Israel, the herded people were kept in camps established at Marseilles. In Germany’s D.P. camps, stories were spread that pogroms were taking place in parts of the United States.” (Lilienthal, WPI?, pp. 196-197)

    As they were reluctant to heed the “call of Zion,” Israeli immigration agents had to “encourage” and in some cases, force Eastern European Jews to immigrate to Israel. “The government [of Israel] made great efforts to encourage Jews in Eastern Europe to migrate to Israel. Its immigration agent in Romania reported in 1950: ‘Working through the local leadership and every reliable Jew we have met, we are urging Jews to make application for emigration and for passports.’ Agents tried to get emigrating Jews to Israel. In Poland Israeli officials would ‘send the people directly to the port, so they would not be able to stop en route,’ reported Samuel Eliashiv, Israel’s ambassador to Czechoslovakia. Israel’s consul in Warsaw, Israel Carmel, found that persuasion was difficult. ‘The awakening of the Jews in Poland will not happen by itself,’ he reported in 1949. ‘They must be motivated and organized.'” (Quigley, p. 99)

    • jrg on August 26, 2019, 3:51 pm

      Wow, great stuff, Misterioso, thanks. There’s a lot of nasty and vacuous ad hominem invective on this site, and sometimes you’re a bit vituperative, too, but you offer solid documentation, with names, dates, quotes and sources more than anyone else. It’s refreshing to encounter some tangible data.

    • Keith on August 27, 2019, 7:12 pm

      MISTERIOSO- “Regarding Jewish refugees:”

      Nice documentation of actual history. Some of these incidents have been commented on in the past by me and others to no effect. When real history conflicts with myth-history, myth-history usually wins. People believe what they want to believe with few exceptions.

      • Talkback on August 29, 2019, 5:18 am

        Keith: “When real history conflicts with myth-history, myth-history usually wins.”

        Not myth-history, but deliberately repeated lies.

  6. Elizabeth Block on August 26, 2019, 5:02 pm

    B’nai Brith in Canada keeps a tally of anti-Semitic incidents. Among them: Someone scrawled “Free Palestine” on a sign advertising, I think, the Jewish National Fund.
    I suggest that Zionists consider why they think a desire for a free Palestine is anti-Semitic.

    And: thanks to Misterioso (whoever she is, I sign my real name) for a necessary review of history.

    • Talkback on August 27, 2019, 4:53 am

      If that’s antisemitic you better not ask them what’s Jewish. Their answer may be anti-Nonjewish.

    • eljay on August 27, 2019, 8:45 am

      || Elizabeth Block: … I suggest that Zionists consider why they think a desire for a free Palestine is anti-Semitic. … ||

      They already know why it’s anti-Semitic: It involves justice, accountability and equality and therefore conflicts with the hateful and immoral ideology of colonialism, (war) criminality and religion-based supremacism that Zionists have deliberately, anti-Semitically and very conveniently conflated with all Jews.

      The religion-based identity of Jewish and the people who choose to embrace it are both the justification for the “necessary evil” of Zionism and the human shields against criticism, blame and accountability.

      Zionists are truly hateful and immoral hypocrites.

    • Mooser on August 28, 2019, 11:41 am

      “whoever she is,”

      As much as I appreciate “Misterioso”, I never thought of that. I just assumed it meant ‘Mister Ioso’.

      But you are right, it very well might mean ‘Mis (Ms.) Terioso’
      Or Mis (Ms.) Teri Oso.

      And once again, assumption makes an ass of me.

      • Keith on August 28, 2019, 6:34 pm

        MOOSER- “And once again, assumption makes an ass of me.”

        Me too. Based upon content, I assumed that Misterioso was a he. Is that wrong? Does Elizabeth Block have inside information? I was wrong about Tree, but still. Makes me wonder, is “Mooser” really a “Cowser?” ‘Fess up dude or dudette!

      • echinococcus on August 29, 2019, 1:26 am

        Bah, if so it is an intended deception; otherwise she’d be Misteriosa.

      • Mooser on August 29, 2019, 4:23 pm

        “Based upon content, I assumed that Misterioso was a he.”

        Graphology never fails, especially in determining gender.

  7. Vera Gottlieb on August 27, 2019, 12:27 pm

    It seems to me that anyone, wherever, not agreeing with israel policies – especially as regards Palestinians, is labelled anti Semite. Not forgetting that most of Jews living in israel are not Semites at all.

  8. Jackdaw on August 28, 2019, 8:18 am

    ““My mother used to walk by a sign at a park in Brooklyn, NY, that read: NO JEWS OR DOGS ALLOWED.”

    I was born and raised in Brooklyn, as was my mother.

    No such sign ever existed, save in Alice’s mom’s faulty memory.

    I could go on.

    • Mooser on August 28, 2019, 12:13 pm

      “I was born and raised in Brooklyn, as was my mother.”

      And you and Mom are always welcome back. There’s nothing like extreme Zionism when you’ve got a ticket out in your pocket when things go to pieces.

      • Jackdaw on August 28, 2019, 5:12 pm

        Mom’s dead, thanks.

        As usual, Looser, you are spot on.

        BTW, did both of you visit Moldova this summer?

      • Mooser on August 29, 2019, 4:25 pm

        “Mom’s dead, thanks.”

        Sorry to hear that. You mentioned a while back she was living with you, but that was several years ago.

        “As usual, Looser, you are spot on.”

        Yes, being an extreme Zionist is much easier when you’ve got a ticket out if needed. I sometimes wonder how ‘real’ Israelis feel about that.

    • Keith on August 28, 2019, 7:34 pm

      JACKDAW- “No such sign ever existed, save in Alice’s mom’s faulty memory.”

      Thanks for sharing. Seriously.

    • RoHa on August 28, 2019, 8:00 pm

      What seems to happen in these cases is, roughly, as follows.

      We hear a story, and automatically develop a set of mental images of the events. If the story is personally compelling, we imagine (automatically) ourselves experiencing it. Later we remember the images, but we have forgotten that they were based on a story, and so believe that they are memories of our own experience.
      I have clear mental images of an event from my brother’s second birthday. I would believe they were a memory if he were not three years older than me.

      Also, it has been found that people will, quite unconsciously, edit their memories to fit a socially agreed account of an event.

      Eyewitness evidence is very unreliable.

    • Talkback on August 29, 2019, 4:36 am

      Jackdaw: ““I was born and raised in Brooklyn, as was my mother.”

      I always had the feeling that you are not a native of Palestine. But now even your mother isn’t. Is there anyone in your family who actually is?

      • Jackdaw on August 29, 2019, 10:53 am

        @Talkless

        My mother’s family were from Jerusalem. They emigrated to Jerusalem from Lithuania in 1811.

        Her grandfather was born in Jerusalem in 1976 and came to New York. He was an Ottoman citizen, not a Palestinian. No such concept existed in the 19th century.

        Bye bye.

      • Jackdaw on August 29, 2019, 11:56 am

        *1876

      • eljay on August 29, 2019, 11:56 am

        || Jackdaw: … My mother’s family were from Jerusalem. They emigrated to Jerusalem from Lithuania in 1811. … ||

        So they were originally from Lithuania, not from Ancient Israel or Israel or “Judea and Samaria” or “Jewish State” or even geographic Palestine. Go figure.

        || … Her grandfather was born in Jerusalem in 1976 [sic] … He was an Ottoman citizen, not a Palestinian. … ||

        So, unlike “the Jews” – but like all other geographic Palestinians – he was actually a geographic Palestinian. It’s amazing how you Zionists are unable to comprehend reality even as you state it clearly.

      • Jackdaw on August 29, 2019, 5:32 pm

        No eljay, they were originally from Eretz Yisroel, emigrated up from Italy and France to the Baltics, and than from Lithuania back to Eretz Yisroel.

        Where did your family come from?
        Sharing is caring.

      • eljay on August 29, 2019, 6:32 pm

        || Jackdaw: No eljay, they were originally from Eretz Yisroel … ||

        And yet you said they migrated from Lithuania to geographic Palestine. Huh. You need to get your fabrications straight.

        But let’s pretend for a moment that way back in time they were from geographic Palestine. Your argument, then, is that any and every person who can trace his/her lineage back to the region at any time in history is a geographic Palestinian and is entitled to return to and to live in the region.

        That is a truly excellent argument for dismantling religion-supremacist “Jewish State” and establishing in geographic Palestine a single secular and democratic (geographic) Palestinian state of and for all geographic Palestinians, equally.

        I can accept this argument.  :-)

        But I’m pretty sure ZioHQ is going to want to have a word with you… :-(

      • RoHa on August 29, 2019, 7:32 pm

        “He was an Ottoman citizen, not a Palestinian. No such concept existed in the 19th century.”

        By the same token, Confucius was not Chinese, and the Buddha was not Indian.

      • RoHa on August 29, 2019, 7:35 pm

        “they were originally from Eretz Yisroel, emigrated up from Italy and France to the Baltics, and than from Lithuania back to Eretz Yisroel.”

        You must have an impressive collection of family documents that prove all this.

      • Sibiriak on August 29, 2019, 8:02 pm

        eljay: So they were originally from Lithuania, not from Ancient Israel…
        ————————————

        Well, they might have been n-generations removed from geographic Ancient Israel.

      • eljay on August 29, 2019, 8:56 pm

        || Sibiriak: eljay: So they were originally from Lithuania, not from Ancient Israel…
        ————————————

        Well, they might have been n-generations removed from geographic Ancient Israel. ||

        Sure, along with tens or perhaps even hundreds of millions of “demographic threat” non-Jews who were also n-generations removed from the region.

      • Jackdaw on August 30, 2019, 2:22 am

        Mondoweiss can try to deconstruct Israel and Judaism all it likes.

        But in the meantime, let’s play a game.

        Where did Lithuanian Jewry arrive from? Germany?

        Where did German Jewry arrive from? France?

        Where did French Jewry arrive from? Italy?

        Where did Italian (Roman) Jewry arrive from? Judea?

      • Talkback on August 30, 2019, 5:08 am

        @ Infantile Zionist

        “No such concept existed in the 19th century.”

        Did any of your ancestors ipso facto acquired Palestinian citizenship because he or she was an Ottoman subject habitually living in Palestine in 1925?

        “Mondoweiss can try to deconstruct Israel and Judaism all it likes.”

        It doesn’t have to. The only legally relevant question is who was a citizen of Palestine in 1925.

        “But in the meantime, let’s play a game.
        Where did Lithuanian Jewry arrive from? Germany?
        Where did German Jewry arrive from? France?
        Where did French Jewry arrive from? Italy?
        Where did Italian (Roman) Jewry arrive from? Judea?”

        Let’s play a more adult game:
        Prove it in your case. ROFL.

      • Talkback on August 30, 2019, 5:23 am

        Sibiriak: “Well, they might have been n-generations removed from geographic Ancient Israel.”

        Removed? And by whom? Is there any evidence Israeli academics could provide that any Jew was “removed” beyond Jerusalem?

      • oldgeezer on August 30, 2019, 7:11 am

        @jackdaw

        “Where did Lithuanian Jewry arrive from? Germany?”

        Maybe. Maybe some did and maybe none did but not necessarily and not necessarily all.

        “Where did German Jewry arrive from? France?”

        Maybe. Maybe some did and maybe none did but not necessarily and not necessarily all.

        “Where did French Jewry arrive from? Italy?”

        Maybe. Maybe some did and maybe none did but not necessarily and not necessarily all.

        “Where did Italian (Roman) Jewry arrive from? Judea?”

        Maybe. Maybe some did and maybe none did but not necessarily and not necessarily all.

        The religion can spread without the original adherents to that religion spreading in any significant way if at all.

        What a silly and brain dead game.

      • eljay on August 30, 2019, 8:55 am

        || Jackdaw: Mondoweiss can try to deconstruct Israel and Judaism all it likes. … ||

        Meanwhile, a Zionist anti-Semitically conflates the two. Imagine that.

        || … Where did … Jewry arrive from? … ||

        Jewry – that is, people who have chosen to embrace the religion-based identity of Jewish – live in and arrive from homelands all over the world.

        In the case of your mother’s family, that would be Lithuania.

      • Sibiriak on August 30, 2019, 11:07 am

        Talkback : Removed?
        ————————————————

        “N-generations removed” is eljay’s personal terminology, which I find neither coherent nor helpful.

        [Talkback: ]Is there any evidence Israeli academics could provide that any Jew was “removed” beyond Jerusalem?

        I presume eljay remains “removed” as in “first cousin removed”, or something like that. Ask him.

        He wrote, “Sure, [perhaps Jackdaw’s Jewish relatives] along with tens or perhaps even hundreds of millions of “demographic threat” non-Jews who were also n-generations removed from the region.

      • Sibiriak on August 30, 2019, 11:34 am

        @Talkback

        Keep in mind that eljay has repeatedly claimed that:

        Geographic Palestine is… the actual homeland of all people living in and up to n-generations removed from it. “.

        How many generations are “n-generations, ” you might ask.

        Well, eljay explains:

        they are whatever a sovereign nation says they are.

        I hope that clears it up for you.

        https://mondoweiss.net/2019/08/oppressive-palestine-conditions/comment-page-1/#comment-954742

      • Mooser on August 30, 2019, 2:42 pm

        “Bye bye” “Jackdaw”

        You keep on saying those words, but I don’t think you know what they mean.

      • eljay on August 30, 2019, 6:23 pm

        || Sibiriak: @Talkback

        Keep in mind that eljay has repeatedly claimed that … ||

        eljay has repeatedly stated his opinion that …

        || … How many generations are “n-generations, ” you might ask. … ||

        It’s really very simple:
        – If Country A says that it is the homeland of all people living in and up to 5 generations removed from it, the number is 5.
        – For Country B, the number might be 3 years.

        I have no problem with a secular and democratic State of Israel deciding that it is the homeland of all people living in and up to (or over) 100 generations removed from within its / Partition borders as long as that number applies to ALL people living in and up to (or over) 100 generations removed from within its / Partition borders.

        Understandably, Jewish supremacists (Zionists) and the religion-supremacist “Jewish State” have a problem with that.

      • RoHa on August 31, 2019, 1:04 am

        “The religion can spread without the original adherents to that religion spreading in any significant way if at all.”

        You mean Korean Christians might not be direct descendants (with no admixture of other people) of the original Antioch Christians?

      • Talkback on August 31, 2019, 5:40 am

        eljay: “Jewry – that is, people who have chosen to embrace the religion-based identity of Jewish – live in and arrive from homelands all over the world.”

        Jackdaw’s “game” is a perfect example how Zionists erased the history of proselytism and forced Judaization to fabricate a history of pure ethnic origin.

      • Mooser on August 31, 2019, 12:37 pm

        “No eljay, they were originally from Eretz Yisroel,.”

        Without erasing the history of Jewish proselytism, can’t we admit that those Jews who are the descendants of the original Israelites exiled from Palestine, and only married other Jews who were exiled, are a better, purer Jews and deserve the highest place in the Jewish hierarchy? And the descendants of converts are strictly Johnny-come-latelies who should be ruled in all things by the pure 100% Jews?

        Anyway, genetic testing, rather than easily forged documents, should clear all this up and restore Judaism to its proper hierarchy. Where that would leave Jews who are children of mixed marriages, we can look at when such an inconceivable thing happens.

      • RoHa on September 1, 2019, 3:59 am

        Mooser, on the mixed marriage issue:

        I get the impression, from American films, that when a white father is less than delighted that his daughter has a black boyfriend, we are supposed to react with horror and disgust at such bigotry, but that when a Jewish mother throws a wobbly over her daughter having a Gentile boyfriend, we are supposed to regard that as an amusing quirk. “It’s a Jewish thing. You wouldn’t understand.”
        Have I got that right?

      • Mooser on September 1, 2019, 5:18 pm

        “I get the impression, from American films…”

        I’m not a movie-watcher.

      • Misterioso on September 4, 2019, 10:00 am

        @Jackdaw, et al

        To restate some pertinent facts:

        The Jebusite/Canaanites were ancestors of today’s Palestinians and it was they who founded Jerusalem circa 3000 BCE. Originally known as Jebus, the first recorded reference to it as “Rushalimum” or “Urussalim,” site of the sacred Foundation Rock, appears in Egyptian Execration Texts of the nineteenth century BCE, nearly 800 years before it is alleged King David was born. Its name “seems to have incorporated the name of the Syrian god Shalem [the Canaanite God of Dusk], who was identified with the setting sun or the evening star…and] can probably be translated as ‘Shalem has founded’.” (Karen Armstrong, Jerusalem, One City, Three Faiths; Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 1996, pp. 6-7)

        It is estimated that the Hebrews did not invade until circa 1184 BCE and their resulting United Kingdom of Israel, which never controlled the coast from Jaffa to Gaza, lasted only about 75–80 years, i.e., less than a blip in the history of Canaan and Palestine. Even the Hasmonean Dynasty under the Maccabees lasted only about 70 years (circa 140 – 70 BCE) and it was under Roman tutelage.

        BTW, no credible archaeological evidence, or more importantly, writings of contemporaneous civilizations, have been found that prove Solomon or David actually existed. (Nor has any evidence been discovered to confirm that the Jewish exodus from Egypt ever occurred. )

        The region between the Jordan River and the Med. Sea was referred to as “Palestine” by the Greek historian Herodotus (“the father of history”) during the 5th century BCE.

        100 years later, in the mid-4th Century BCE, Aristotle referred to Palestine while discussing the Dead Sea in his Meteorology. “Again if, as is fabled, there is a lake in Palestine….”

        Jewish historian Josephus’s (c.37-100 CE) The Jewish War, Antiquities of the Jews contains many references to both “Palestine” and “Palestinians.”

        To quote the opening sentence of the section entitled “Filastin” that appears in the book “Dictionary of the Lands,” written by geographer Yaqut ibn Abdullah al-Hamawi in 1225: “Filastin: It is the last one of the regions of Syria in the direction of Egypt. Its most famous cities are Ashkelon, Ramle, Gaza, Arsuf, Caesaria, Nablus, Jericho, Jaffa and Beit Guvrin.”

        By about 1300 CE there were virtually no Jews in Palestine, which was a recognized geographical concept using coinage with “Filistin” (no “P” in Arabic) written on them. There were diaries of Palestinian travelers who said they missed “Palestine” and a distinctive Palestinian dialect of Arabic had evolved. From 1300 on, the vast majority of people who lived in Palestine were Christians and Muslims.

        In 1603, Shakespeare wrote in his play Othello: “Emilia: I know a lady in Venice who would have walked barefoot to Palestine for a touch of his nether lip.” (Act IV, Scene iii.)

        In 1863, The Religious Tract Society of London published its “Pictorial Journey Through the Holy Land; or Scenes of Palestine.” In this work Beersheba is described as the southern limit of Palestine. “Beersheba lies south-east of Gaza on the northern edge of the Negev desert.’ Palestine is described as “south of Lebanon.”

        European tourist books of the nineteenth century refer to “Palestine,” as did Theodor Herzl in his correspondence and the 1917 Balfour Declaration as well as the 1922 Class A League of Nations British Mandate.

        Renowned historian/anthropologist and “Holy Land” specialist, Professor Ilene Beatty: “When we speak of ‘Palestinians’ or of the ‘Arab population [of Palestine]‘, we must bear in mind their Canaanite origin. This is important because their legal right to the country stems… from the fact that the Canaanites were first, which gives them priority; their descendants have continued to live there, which gives them continuity; and (except for the 800,000 dispossessed refugees [of 1948 along with the further hundreds of thousands expelled before and after the war Israel launched on 5 June 1967]) they are still living there, which gives them present possession. Thus we see that on purely statistical grounds they have a proven legal right to their own land.” (“Arab and Jew in the Land of Canaan,” 1957)

        To quote Polish born David Ben-Gurion (real name, David Gruen): “‘race’ does not unite Jewry since the ancient people dissipated after so much dispersion.” (Philippe de Saint Robert, Le Jeu de la France en Mediteranee, 1970, p.182)

        For the record: “The Racist Gene” Haaretz, June 21, 2017:
        EXCERPT: “In 2013, the results were published of a study by the prominent British geneticist Martin Richards, who specializes in researching the maternal genome, which passes from the mother to all of her descendants. Richards researched the maternal genetic ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews. And lo and behold, he discovered that 80 percent or more (!) of the maternal genetic makeup of Ashkenazi Jews derives from European women – goys, heaven forbid. Gevalt! Devoid of any gene originating in the Land of Israel.”

        And of course, especially for Jackdaw:
        http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fgene.2017.00087/full
        Front. Genet., 21 June 2017 | https://doi.org/10.3389/fgene.2017.00087

        “The Origins of Ashkenaz, Ashkenazic Jews, and Yiddish”

        “Recent genetic samples from bones found in Palestine dating to the Epipaleolithic (20000-10500 BCE) showed remarkable resemblance to modern day Palestinians.”

        EXCERPTS:
        “The non-Levantine origin of AJs [Ashkenazi Jews] is further supported by an ancient DNA analysis of six Natufians and a Levantine Neolithic (Lazaridis et al., 2016), some of the most likely Judaean progenitors (Finkelstein and Silberman, 2002; Frendo, 2004). In a principle component analysis (PCA), the ancient Levantines clustered predominantly with modern-day Palestinians and Bedouins and marginally overlapped with Arabian Jews, whereas AJs clustered away from Levantine individuals and adjacent to Neolithic Anatolians and Late Neolithic and Bronze Age Europeans.”

        “Overall, the combined results are in a strong agreement with the predictions of the Irano-Turko-Slavic hypothesis (Table 1) and rule out an ancient Levantine origin for AJs, which is predominant among modern-day Levantine populations (e.g., Bedouins and Palestinians). This is not surprising since Jews differed in cultural practices and norms (Sand, 2011) and tended to adopt local customs (Falk, 2006). Very little Palestinian Jewish culture survived outside of Palestine (Sand, 2009). For example, the folklore and folkways of the Jews in northern Europe is distinctly pre-Christian German (Patai, 1983) and Slavic in origin, which disappeared among the latter (Wexler, 1993, 2012).”

      • Mooser on September 4, 2019, 2:23 pm

        “And lo and behold, he discovered that 80 percent or more (!) of the maternal genetic makeup of Ashkenazi Jews derives from European women”

        This is indeed shocking information, especially when I consider that Judaism in inherited through the mitochondrial line!

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