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book review

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In a book dismissing the Palestinian refugee issue, Israeli authors Einat Wilf and Adi Schwartz totally absolve adherents of the Zionist ideology from any historic responsibility for planning and executing a strategy in which dispossessing Palestinians from the land was premeditated intention. The authors are hasbarists.

Huey P. Newton, co-founder of the Black Panther Party, at an unknown Palestinian refugee camp in Lebanon, 1980. (Photo: Dr. Huey P. Newton Foundation Inc./Department of Speical Collections and University Archives, Stanford University Libraries)

Bill Mullen writes, “Michael Fischbach’s Black Power and Palestine is the best book yet written on the contemporary history of Afro-Palestinian solidarity.  The book is invaluable as a scholarly record of Black efforts to organize with and in support of Palestinian liberation, but also as a political argument about the centrality of Palestinian solidarity work to building internationalist, anti-imperialist solidarity in our time.”

Susan Abulhawa reviews Anita Anand’s The Patient Assassin, the dramatic true story of a little known orphan boy who spent his life plotting a revenge that would eventually rattle the British Empire to its core: “This is a book for students of history, for lovers of thriller novels, and for anyone interested in contemporary politics, social movements, liberation struggles, biographies, or just a well-told true drama.”

Martin Buber

Marc Ellis reviews Paul Mendes-Flohr’s new biography, Martin Buber: A life of Faith and Dissent: “My biggest complaint, a serious one, is that Buber’s understanding of the prophetic is mentioned but is hardly given the due needed. Buber’s analysis of the prophetic and its consistent failure, exemplified in his life both in Germany, Palestine and Israel, will, in my view, be, perhaps already is, Buber’s greatest contribution to the Jewish present and future.”