The latest outrage: Muslim joins University of California board

The search for the latest outrage ended on Thursday when it emerged that a Muslim woman – Sadia Saifuddin – had been awarded a seat on the University of California’s governing board. Sensible, humane “Jewish groups” decried the appointment in light of Ms. Saifuddin’s activism around divestment from apartheid.

According to YNet News:

Jewish groups including the prominent Simon Wiesenthal Center strongly objected to her nomination, citing her involvement in a campaign to divest university funds from companies with business connections to the Israeli military.

They also objected to her sponsoring a student senate resolution that condemned a lecturer at the system’s Santa Cruz campus for what the resolution said was Islamophobic rhetoric. The groups said it was Saifuddin who showed intolerance toward opposing viewpoints.

“In a year where campus climate issues have been the dominant theme of the UC system, a vote to appoint somebody who has served to polarize thousands and thousands of people in the campus community and beyond is shocking,” said Rabbi Aron Hier of the Wiesenthal Center, which petitioned the regents to deny Saifuddin a seat on the board. 

On a serious note, this case represents the nefarious role that Zionism has played and continues to play in American life. A group of prominent Zionists have banded together to alienate a talented young American from civic engagement here
because of her opposition to the occupation – or more accurately, to “companies with business connections to the Israeli military.”

It’s encouraging that every member of the board who voted voted in favor of confirmation (with one abstention who “cited concerns about Saifuddin’s divestment efforts”). That’s evidence of the fact that increasingly American Zionists are being ignored by people who actually believe in building a meritocracy and equality among citizens. It’s evidence that this band of segregationists is going the way of the white segregationists who preceded them.

Finally, if you’re wondering about the UC Santa Cruz lecturer whom Saifuddin condemned in a petition, well, it’s more of the same: 

“And who are the primary sources of this?” she asks in the video. “Primarily the MSA [Muslim Student Association] and the SJP [Students for Justice in Palestine] students … they are generally motivated by very strong religious and political convictions, they have a fire in their belly, they come to the university, many of them are foreign students who come from countries and cultures where anti-Semitism is how they think about the world … These are not your ordinary student groups like College Republicans or Young Democrats. These are students who come with a serious agenda, who have ties to terrorist organizations.”

 

About Ahmed Moor

Ahmed Moor is a Palestinian-American who was born in the Gaza Strip. He is a Soros Fellow, co-editor of After Zionism and co-founder and CEO of liwwa.com. Twitter: @ahmedmoor
Posted in Israel/Palestine

{ 34 comments... read them below or add one }

  1. Yes how dare anyone urging divestment from a military occupier!
    Is it supremacism that best define this stance?

  2. amigo says:

    Better call for an emergency meeting of the Security Council.

    This has to be nipped in the bud immediately.

  3. Cliff says:

    I think it’s safe to say that the organized Jewish community plays a role in fostering hate and bigotry towards political competitors.

    It’s amazing how all these Jewish groups come out against this one Muslim girl.

    • Wesley says:

      There is not a shred of evidence that suggests hate or bigotry, just strong opposition to an appointee based on her views on UC matters pertaining to I/P.

      Just as it is wrong for pro-Israel people to label anyone with whom they disagree on I/P policy an anti-Semite, it is no less wrong for you to claim that groups with a contrary position to yours “foster hate and bigotry.” If you’re concerned about bigotry, I think you need to look in the mirror before you slander “the organized Jewish community” with that broad of a brush.

      • Cliff says:

        The organized Jewish community is one-dimensional.

        There are no mainstream anti-Zionist American Jewish organizations with any political relevance.

        The organized Jewish community is Zionist. HENCE, painting them with the same Zionist brush is accurate.

        They hate Muslims and Arabs and especially Palestinians.

        There might be a few Islamophobic Muslims and/or ‘former’ Muslims and/or ‘former Palestinians (i.e., fake Palestinians like Walid Shoebat)’ who are in the employ of various neocon/Zionist organizations but they aren’t invited to talks for their Muslimness.

        They are invited to talks because they hate Muslims and have the appearance of legitimacy as being ‘Muslim’ or ‘from Muslims’.

        Don’t issue lame equivocations. This has nothing to do with her politics.

      • hi wesley, actually there is more than a shred of evidence. check out this example of a JCRC press release and how they use the term “organized Jewish community” in the second blockquote:

        link to mondoweiss.net

        and then the subject line of the email makes it clear who they wish to speak for “Bay Area Jewish Community Condemns ”

        surasky makes an excellent point:

        In fact, while the Jewish Community Relations Council claims to represent Bay Area Jews, they won’t release the number or names of groups they represent. That certainly makes one wonder if the number is embarrassingly small. And it’s likely shrinking. There is no shortage of Jews around here, from a wide political spectrum, who would be appalled to be associated with an attack on a Muslim group for using a word that Israeli officials use regularly.

        “organized Jewish community” is not a term cliff made up, it’s a term fringe extremist groups like standwithus bandy about all the time trying to convince the rest of us jews speak in one mind, which they do not. there’s evidence of that all over the place. and they do it to keep jews as well as the rest of us in line, it’s a fear tactic. groups like the emergency committee for israel, the israel project, aipac .. they make the rules and those rules include slandering people like sadia.

        it is no less wrong for you to claim that groups with a contrary position to yours “foster hate and bigotry.” If you’re concerned about bigotry, I think you need to look in the mirror before you slander “the organized Jewish community” with that broad of a brush.

        so what’s good for the goose is not good for the gander? here’s jcrc:

        They have called on “all civic, ethnic and religious leaders who oppose bigoted lies and demonization to exercise their constitutional rights by condemning these inflammatory advertisements.”

        iow, those who claim to speak for the “organized Jewish community” can accuse their opponents of bigotry but when it’s flipped around it’s too broad a brush to be used against the “organized Jewish community”. because, according to you, when the “organized Jewish community” uses accusations of bigotry “There is not a shred of evidence that suggests hate or bigotry”!!!

        and here’s a member of the “organized Jewish community” spreading lies about her, which is evidence: link to news.yahoo.com

        “She is prominent in the anti-Israel boycott campaign, an extremist movement that demonized the Jewish state, rejects dialogue, and fosters bigotry,” Roberta Seid, a research-education director at StandWithUs

        what you are engaged in is an effort of silencing.

        read sadia on that effort:

        link to dailycal.org

        and it is a lie to say that people who support divestment reject dialogue. the very word “demonize” drags a statanic biblical context into the conversation which is designed to put people on the defensive when they have very legitimate claims against the occupation and the oppression of millions of people. as if mentioning that is in itself an outlandish accusation. these “demonization” accusations are not random, they are placed there on purpose, likely by design from think tanks and professionals. accusations israel’s critics “demonize” is a powerful rhetorical argument. and it is not ‘demonization’ to express support for divestment. the accusation itself is silencing, and evidence of what you claim does not exist.

        i think your beef should be the people who claim to speak for ‘the jewish community’, now that’s a broad brush.

        • Wesley says:

          Thanks for your reply, Annie. I agree with you that the JCRC’s action re- the bus ads are wrong, and, like you, I don’t agree with StandWithUs’ views on Sadia. My original point, though, is that neither the above-referenced article, nor Cliff, nor you, have presented any evidence that opposition to Sadia is based on her religion, or is any any way hateful or bigoted. So the title of this post is misleading.

          You have not addressed that concern. Instead, you say that I’m trying to “silence” Cliff by making this point, and Cliff calls me “a concern-troll.” Needless to say, all of this is completely ad-hominem, and seems off-key on a website devoted to the open exchange of ideas regarding I/P.

          One more point on Cliff: he asserts that “the organized Jewish community is one-dimensional” and “hate[s] Muslims.” I consider myself a post-Zionist Jew & am active in organized Judaism, so I know from personal experience that these statements are false. I don’t think I can change Cliff’s heart, which seems to hold a lot of anger at Jews qua Jews. But, Annie, since you seem to be a fair-minded advocate for Palestine, I hope that you will re-read Cliff’s comments, and reconsider making common cause with people holding these views.

        • wesley, there are other conversations here besides the one you want to talk about. cliff commented and you responded here: link to mondoweiss.net

          there’s nothing in that comment of your about your “original point”. i didn’t respond to it because i was not inspired to. i think our society is inundated with evidence muslims are targeted simply for being muslims and the denials (like jpost’s article, paraphrasing Rabbi Hier of the Wiesenthal Center, ‘i have no problem w/muslims it’s just the kind of muslim she is, if only she was the appropriate kind of muslim etc )

          we know what this means. it means a moderate muslim which is code for a muslim that agrees the only way to peace is a 2SS thru negotiation between the oppressed and the oppressor and both sides need to come to the table and chat while israel gets to keep building settlements.

          this is their problem w/her, and people who don’t agree w/their pov are labeled ‘extremists’a and fringe and accused of demonizing ‘the jewish state’ etc etc. and that’s what you want to discuss. we get it. maybe nobody is interested in ‘your point’ because it’s worn out ..like to death. there’s an islamophobic industry out there and we can all close our eyes and pretend david horowitz really has no problem w/the right kind of muslim. or not. i chose not. i chose to engage you in another of your comments.

          you said “There is not a shred of evidence that suggests hate or bigotry” was cause the rejection of her. ok, i will give you this…no one from team islamophobe came out and stated unequivocally they reject her just because she’s a muslim. maybe you should start your own blog and that way you can choose your own headlines. basically, people just ain’t buying this hasbara crap about what constitutes extremism or an extremist muslim. the rabbi’s words:

          “An appropriate Muslim candidate could have ably served in this position. We don’t believe Sadia is that appropriate candidate,”

          that’s just code. why did he even include the word muslim? why not just “An appropriate candidate could have ably served in this position. We don’t believe Sadia is that appropriate candidate,”

          she’s an uppity muslim who doesn’t know her place. it’s racist. where you do not see a ‘shred of evidence’ i think it abounds.

          your ‘concern’ is duly noted. it’s just completely distracting and irrelevant as far as i am concerned.

        • Cliff says:

          and seems off-key on a website devoted to the open exchange of ideas regarding I/P.

          This is why you’re a concern troll.

          You say you’re active in ‘organized Judaism’.

          I didn’t say ‘organized Judaism’ is against Muslims. I said the organized Jewish community.

          The only reason for Jews or any other group to ‘organize’ is for achieving political goals.

          So tell me what organization you belong to and what their politics are regarding Israel.

          If it’s anything other than JVP, I’m 100% right. If it’s JVP, then this is a semantic issue – and I’m still right.

          There are no mainstream Jewish organizations that reject anti-Islamic bigotry as a matter of virtue.

          If it is rejected, it’s within an apolitical context (apolitical towards Israel that is). When Israel is part of the equation, then these groups’ responses range from tepid to silence to ranting/raving.

        • Cliff says:

          Wesley – like the opposition – believe that a Muslim commentator is fine so long as they are completely apolitical OR if they are like Nonie Darwish, Gabriel Something, Walid Shoebat, the Beduoin Israeli soldier who makes a living touring US campuses selling his b.s., etc. etc. etc.

          Basically this Muslim girl would not be an issue if she were Muslim in the employ of either the Israel Lobby or the Israeli government.

          Muslims who support American invasion/occupation, who support profiling Muslims, who support Israel and a war with Iran = are Muslims according to Zionists.

          Muslims who do not fit the above criteria are associated with the MB or are extremists or are terrorist-sympathizers or ‘anti-Israel’.

        • Wesley says:

          Cliff: to answer your question about what Jewish organizations I belong to (“and if it’s anything other than JVP, I’m 100% right”): I am active in my synagogue’s lay leadership, and also volunteer for a Jewish charity for the elderly. (This may surprise you, but Judaism is an ancient & beautiful religion, not an offshoot of Aipac.) For the record, I have given money to JVP in the past, but am not active in it. I can assure you that none of those organizations “hate Muslims,” as you ignorantly asserted all Jewish orgs do.

          Annie: I am glad that you agree (or at least “will give me that”) there’s no evidence in the article that suggests that opposition to Sadia has to do with her religion. I respect that you don’t want to engage in a conversation about that. Still, I think it’s a shame that a MW staff writer doesn’t seem to care that a headline is inaccurate in a way that unfairly slimes Jewish groups that oppose Sadia. It’s one thing to take a very critical stance towards Israel (that’s what originally attracted me to this site!), but quite another to ascribe the worst possible motives to “Jewish organizations” at every turn, and without any substantiation. I am saddened that, with this headline, MW seems to be going in the latter direction.

        • seanmcbride says:

          Wesley,

          I consider myself a post-Zionist Jew & am active in organized Judaism

          Which leading organizations within organized Judaism are post-Zionist, non-Zionist or anti-Zionist? That have drawn clear lines and distinctions between Zionism and Judaism?

        • Cliff says:

          Wesley said:

          I am active in my synagogue’s lay leadership, and also volunteer for a Jewish charity for the elderly.

          Your synagogue is not the ‘organized Jewish community’. Neither is a Jewish charity for the elderly.

          I don’t care about Judaism because I don’t care about religion. I’m not obligated to care about your religion so don’t tell me about how ‘beautiful’ it is when I never even called that beauty into question (since it’s a complete non-issue for me).

          You are weasel-wording and defining ‘the organized Jewish community’ to include synagogues who apparently (since you did not answer my question in full) have no politics whatsoever.

          Tell me – is your synagogue apolitical? Does Israel come up? What is your synagogue’s stance on the settlements, on BDS, on anti-Zionism, on 1948, on 1967, on Sabra and Shatilla, on Operation Cast Lead, on Rachel Corrie, etc. etc.

          Does your synagogue fundraise for Israel-related causes?

          It’s great that you donated once to JVP awhile ago but aren’t a member (LOL).

          None of what you said contradicts my assumptions.

          As I said, the organized Jewish community is Islamophobic (because the organized Jewish community is Zionist).

        • Wesley says:

          Sean: Please see above. Judaism is a religion; Zionism is a political movement. From personal experience, I can tell you that one can thrive in the organized Jewish community without being a Zionist. I can’t believe that I have to keep explaining this to Mondoweiss readers, since much of the MW project ostensibly involves showing that there’s a distinction btw the two.

          Annie: You conceded that this headline is misleading, but said that you don’t really care. You also keep defending Cliff, who has some truly odious thoughts about the motives of “the organized Jewish community” writ large. When I called Cliff out on this, you said I’m “silencing” him. I’ll just point out that you are a staff writer on this site. Don’t you you owe it to your readers — who put their trust in you to make good-faith arguments — to have just a bit more integrity than this?

          Other readers: Once again, my only interest here is in pointing out that the headline here is misleading, based on the article text. I didn’t expect to get this much pushback for that. I certainly didn’t expect to be grouped with “the opposition” and told by people like Cliff what my beliefs must be. And I absolutely didn’t expect a MW staff writer to jump in with a series of non sequiturs & defenses of Cliff’s strange theories about the Jewish community and little old me. If you’re interested in an open-minded, justice-seeking, pro-Palestinian website, I encourage you to look elsewhere.

        • seanmcbride says:

          Wesley,

          This may surprise you, but Judaism is an ancient and beautiful religion, not an offshoot of Aipac.

          Hasn’t the contemporary worldwide mainstream Jewish religious establishment fully embraced Zionism and seamlessly merged it with Judaism as an ethno-religious nationalist ideology? Mainstream Judaism now = Jewish religious Zionism.

          What this means is that most contemporary Jews who are indoctrinated in Judaism also fully absorb Zionism and Jewish ethno-religious nationalism. They are psychologically wired to feel the deepest possible emotional loyalties to the state of Israel.

          How one can pursue this discussion rationally is by analyzing the public statements of leading Jewish religious organizations on the subject. Google makes that a breeze.

        • seanmcbride says:

          Wesley,

          Sean: Please see above. Judaism is a religion; Zionism is a political movement.

          But many leaders of the worldwide Jewish religious establishment over the last half century have conflated and merged Judaism and Zionism into a single ethno-religious nationalist ideology — one can easily find thousands of statements of this nature promoting this belief in the mainstream Jewish and Israeli media.

          The last few generations of Jews have been heavily indoctrinated in the belief that Judaism is intrinsically and essentially an ethnic nationalist belief system that requires absolute loyalty from them towards Zionism and the state of Israel — this is a matter of religious belief.

          Which leading Jewish religious organizations can you name which have pushed back against these developments, other than a few ultra-Orthodox groups (some of which have even gone so far as to describe Zionism as an evil ideology that it equivalent to Nazism)?

          With which branch of Judaism are you associated? Can you point us to its public statements on Israel and Zionism?

        • seanmcbride says:

          Cliff wrote:

          Tell me – is your synagogue apolitical? Does Israel come up? What is your synagogue’s stance on the settlements, on BDS, on anti-Zionism, on 1948, on 1967, on Sabra and Shatilla, on Operation Cast Lead, on Rachel Corrie, etc. etc.

          Does your synagogue fundraise for Israel-related causes?

          One presumes that Wesley’s synagogue maintains a website in which issues concerning Israel are addressed — perhaps he can point us to it.

        • Cliff says:

          Wesley said:

          defenses of Cliff’s strange theories about the Jewish community and little old me[...]

          If you’re interested in an open-minded, justice-seeking, pro-Palestinian website, I encourage you to look elsewhere.

          Don’t slander MW because of this farcical and selective interpretation of it’s comments section or because you disagree with one headline.

          I’m not a MW writer or editor.

          As to what I actually said – I have repeatedly asked you to answer some basic questions that would either prove or undermine my initial comments.

          You are not a member of the ‘organized Jewish community’. You go to temple. I went to temple too when I was younger (Hindu temple that is) – that didn’t make me part of any American Indian Hindu political agency though.

          So in other words, you weasel-worded the criteria. The end.

        • German Lefty says:

          jpost’s article, paraphrasing Rabbi Hier of the Wiesenthal Center, ‘i have no problem w/muslims it’s just the kind of muslim she is, if only she was the appropriate kind of muslim

          Annie, I can’t find anything wrong with this statement. I would say the exact same thing about Jews: “I have no problem with Jews. It’s just the kind of Jew Netanyahu is (= Zionist), if only he was the appropriate kind of Jew (= anti-Zionist).”

          Regardless of Wesley’s intention or political views, he is right in pointing out that the headline is misleading. The “Jewish groups” did not object to Ms. Saifuddin’s nomination because of her religion but because of her political views, i.e. her support for justice. Religion and political views are two entirely different things.
          When I negatively criticise Israeli policies, the usual Zionist response is: “You just hate Israel because it’s a Jewish state.” Of course, that’s not true and there’s no evidence to prove this accusation.
          It’s important to be accurate. Don’t confuse religion and political views. Objecting to Saifuddin’s nomination because she supports justice for Palestinians is already terrible enough and worthy of reporting. There’s no need to claim in the headline that it’s about her religion. Of course, Zionism and Islamophobia often go hand in hand, but they are two different things nonetheless.

        • Wesley says:

          Cliff: If you don’t think that synagogues are part of the “organized Jewish community,” then we are not speaking the same language. Not much else to say.

          Regarding Sean’s comment: There is some wonderful content on Mondoweiss, but if you or anyone else thinks that Zionism has melded onto Judaism to nearly the extent that you suggest (sadly, it has in some respects), I’d suggest broadening your reading list. tikkun.org, ou.org, chabad.org — or the Jewish studies section of your local library — would be good places to start.

        • Cliff says:

          Wesley,

          Why haven’t you, after all these posts answered my simple question?

          What is your synagogue’s politics? What is their stance on Israel? BDS? Brand Israel? Rachel Corrie? Settlements? Birthright Israel? The Occupation? Etc etc etc

          You still ignore that question so that you can straw-man my argument.

          Yes, your synagogue is not part of the organized Jewish community if it is apolitical on Israel (which I doubt).

          The organized Jewish community is ‘organized’ to achieve political goals.

          Muslims tend to be sympathetic to the Palestinians. So countering Muslim agency, Arab-American agency, etc. is important for the organized Jewish community.

          JVP is fringe. Every group that matters is Zionist.

          So once again, you are intentionally missing the point and lying; making it seem as if I’m saying there is something to Jewish DNA that makes them Islamophobic.

          Get over yourself.

        • seanmcbride says:

          Wesley,

          Once again: which leaders of the worldwide Jewish religious establishment have made efforts during the last half century to draw clear lines between Judaism and Zionism? Can you name at least a few specific names with cites?

          I have seen literally thousands of instances during the last decade in which Jewish religious leaders have explicitly merged Judaism and Zionism into a single ethno-religious nationalist ideology organized around the state of Israel — including Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstructionist Jewish religious leaders — all across the Jewish religious spectrum.

          I am already familiar with the three websites you mentioned — they support my argument, not yours.

      • Donald says:

        “There is not a shred of evidence that suggests hate or bigotry, just strong opposition to an appointee based on her views on UC matters pertaining to I/P.”

        Weasel words. As Annie said, being a Muslim is perfectly acceptable so long as one is a “tame” Muslim, one who doesn’t rock the boat. Criticize Israel in harsh terms and one is an anti-semite. I knew plenty of white bigots growing up who made distinctions among blacks in the same way, as though they were in some morally superior position and could distinguish between the good ones and the bad ones.

        As for “contrary position to yours”, again, this is more weaseling. There is a wide range of views on this subject and not everyone even on the Zionist side would have labeled Ms. Saiffudin as an intolerant extremist. They could disagree with her without attacking her in that fashion.

        On Cliff’s remark about the “organized Jewish community”, those of us outside of it mostly just see and hear the David Harris/Abe Foxman types and for that matter, when I see the local Jewish newspaper in the library, there is usually this “cheerleading” quality towards Israel and a dismissive attitude towards the Palestinians. I know there are other viewpoints (as a Tikkun subscriber I’m on various mailing lists), but they aren’t as loud. Obviously people in Congress seem to hear the Foxman types much more than they hear the Michael Lerner types.

        • Wesley says:

          Donald, I agree at least that the Tikkun/Lerner voices are not as loud as the Abe Foxman types. I see that as a problem, and am trying in my own life to give voice to the “Tikkun wing” of Judaism.

          One way to strengthen that project is to loudly and unequivocally object when people, like many of those in this comment thread, say things like “the organized Jewish community” hates Muslims that “mainstream Judaism = Jewish religious Zionism.” It’s simply not true, at least in my experience and those of most of the Jewish people that I know.

          Still, like many Jewish readers of MW, I am concerned that for a growing number of people, organized Judaism = Zionism. One way to combat that trend is to promote voices within Judaism that are post-Zionist, anti-Zionist, or do not take a position on Zionism. Another way to do it is to make honest, good-faith arguments that will convince others, and not just appeal to the true-believers. That’s why I initially commented on this article’s misleading title.

          I am sorry that others in this thread — including a MW staff writer! — have chosen to take a very different approach.

        • Wesley says:

          I’m definitely not trying to use “weasel words” here, so let me state my original comment plainly:

          – This is a news article. News articles, even from opinion journalists, should be factually accurate.
          – There is no evidence **in the text of this article** (key phrase) to support a headline suggesting that Sadia’s Muslim faith plays a role in the opposition to her. Maybe there’s other info out there to support the headline, but it’s not present in this news article.
          – It’s troubling to me that Mondoweiss would have a misleading headline.
          – It’s also troubling to me that a MW staff writer, Annie Robbins, acknowledged that the headline is inaccurate, & also that she doesn’t care.

          That’s it!

        • Wesley says:

          Oh yeah, and I also made a side point: I challenged commenters who claimed that the organized Jewish community/Jewish orgs/whatever-term-for-Jews-in-groups-that-will-stop-me-from-getting-personally-attacked acts as a monolith that hates Muslims (Cliff) or is synonymous with Zionism (Sean). In retrospect, I shouldn’t have wadded into the mud.

        • Cliff says:

          No one said mainstream Judaism hates Muslims you liar.

          No one said organized JUDAISM.

        • Cliff says:

          The organized Jewish community is Zionist.

          There is not a diversity of voices. It is overwhelmingly Zionist.

          JVP is fringe.

          Judaism is not the focus. Political groups are, because the organized Jewish community organizes in the first place to achieve political goals.

          There is no other reason for groups like the ADL to exist. They exist to strengthen and perpetuate Jewish agency such as it is.

          No mainstream Jewish groups just go around singing kumbaya whilst remaining silent on Israel. They are all political.

          A random synagogue that you continually evade describing is irrelevant to the only meaningful context underlying ‘the organized Jewish community’ – Zionism.

  4. Wesley says:

    Opposition to a person’s appointment based on her political views is within the bounds of public debate; opposition based on her religion is not. Without any evidence that Saifuddin’s religion has anything to do with the opposition to her appointment, your provocative headline (“The latest outrage: Muslim joins UC board”) is misleading.

  5. RE: “On a serious note, this case represents the nefarious role that Zionism has played and continues to play in American life. A group of prominent Zionists have banded together to alienate a talented young American from civic engagement here because of her opposition to the occupation . . .” ~ Ahmed Moor

    MY COMMENT: This “nefarious role that Zionism has played and continues to play in American life” is yet another reason I fear that Revisionist Zionism and Likudnik Israel (specifically by virtue of their inordinate sway over the U.S.) might very well be an “existential threat” to the values of The Enlightenment [like the "right of free speech" and the "freedom of association"]! ! !
    “Down, down, down we [the U.S.] go into the deep, dark abyss; hand in hand with Israel.”

    P.S. OTHER EXAMPLES OF ISRAEL’S VALUES TRUMPING (OVERRIDING) THE VALUES OF THE ENLIGHTENMENT – link to mondoweiss.net

  6. MHughes976 says:

    I glanced over at the LA Times and noted that Ms. Saifuddin will be working with incoming UC President Janet Napolitano, making an interesting pair. I was encouraged to see the matter-of-fact tone of the report ‘Stockton woman elected’. All in all it’s a really encouraging demonstration of the open-mindednes and resistance to scaremongering of the California student body, who will provide many of the leading citizens of California in no long time.

  7. Chu says:

    These Zionist groups are like coordinated pack animals trying to tear this girl apart. Great that she won and she beat these phonies (as the crowd was roaring after her vote).

    Zionists groups act like they are so concerned and sensitive to ‘delicate’ issues, but it’s only when they are questioned. And, of course trying to discredit this young girl is fair game. Why don’t more people speak out against this?

    As these stories accumulate over the years, people are really starting to get a picture of Zionism’s clutches. There is going to be a point when people have had it. Regardless of how much money they throw at new political candidates. Expect a coup someday, hopefully soon.

  8. just says:

    Interesting that Richard (Dianne Feinstein) Blum abstained from the vote, otherwise it was unanimous.

    “The vote for Saifuddin’s appointment was unanimous among the regents except for Richard Blum, who abstained, stating, “If you’re going to be the student representative, you have to represent all students. You don’t want to alienate them. … So I’ve got a problem with this.”"
    link to blogs.kqed.org

    Well, Richie– you live in America, where we have all “kinds”!!! What a schmuck.

    (GO UC Berkeley! Congratulations to the regents and to Ms. Saifuddin– a wonderful senior student from what I have read)