Trending Topics:

Palestinians increasingly concerned Jordan may be given control of West Bank in future deal

Israel/Palestine
on 26 Comments
Israeli-controlled Allenby Bridge Crossing between Jordan and the West Bank, July 9, 2009. (Photo: Reuters)

Israeli-controlled Allenby Bridge Crossing between Jordan and the West Bank, July 9, 2009. (Photo: Reuters)

This is part of Marc H. Ellis’s “Exile and the Prophetic” feature for Mondoweiss. To read the entire series visit the archive page.

In Vienna last week, it wasn’t the people surrounding the interfaith dialogue that were boring.  Not at all.  The organizers of the conference are committed Austrian Christians who repent of their country’s history of anti-Semitism and are deeply committed to Palestinian freedom.

The problem is that we are stuck in a thoroughly invested time warp. It’s a rhetorical time scheme. Reality is about to intrude.

The theoretical discussion of political ways forward in Israel/Palestine suffers the same fate. So when I reported on the revived Jordanian option yesterday, the blowback was predictable.

Nonetheless, the handwriting is on the (W)all.  Believe what you see.

What I hear from various sources is Jordan’s return to Palestine. It makes perfect sense. Some Palestinians will welcome the new “freedom” such an option offers.

These sources are four people from different political strata – not high up by any means – but interesting and not to be divulged I’m afraid. One is quite connected in the Islamic community, the others are different types of activists whom I have known for years and their attitude is telling – very much resigned to the devolution of Palestinian leadership and society. They are at the end of their rope.

According to my sources, this is how it goes. Under the umbrella of Jordan, Palestinians will have a way out of Jerusalem and the West Bank that is not (officially) controlled by Israel. That’s for travel to visit family in the Palestinian Diaspora, tourism, employment opportunities and purchasing goods. Like everyone else with means, Palestinians go where they want for the reasons they want. Then there will be a Jordanian way in for travel and trade, again not (officially) controlled by Israel. The world will open up for Palestinians. Severely restricted space and opportunity will seem less onerous.

“Seem” is the operative word here. Jordan will control the way in and out of Palestine and, especially with its Palestinian population “problem,” Jordan’s control will be considerable.

Jordan’s balancing act will be delicate and ongoing lest Jordan’s ruling class be displaced and Jordan become Palestine. Sound familiar?

For an oppressed people with no way out under Israel, the appearance of normalcy is more than meets the eye.  Hope is reality negotiated. Is this negotiated hope better than Israel’s rule?

It’s easy for those on the outside to cite the obvious contradictions. But, then again, Palestinians are already negotiating occupation on a grand scale. Why not negotiate a renewed Jordanian occupation?

The BDS mantra is that Palestinians speak and those on the outside listen. This mantra has always been more complicated than assumed. Who speaks for Palestinians? What if Palestinians in Jerusalem and the West Bank “speak” Jordan?

No matter the negotiated reality, under the revived Jordanian option Palestinian freedom will be severely truncated. Did anyone think that real freedom for Palestinians was on the American or Middle Eastern table – ever?

Gaza is left out of this scenario. My sources don’t know what to do with Palestine without Gaza. Nonetheless, what appears impossible may be happening. After all, Israel and Egypt already have Gaza figured out. Why complicate Gaza with Jordan?

My sources tell me that Palestinians who live the daily grind have had enough. This makes perfect sense. The repeated traumas of Israeli aggression have taken their toll. The third intifada option floated by John Kerry doesn’t hold much appeal for Palestinians who would actually experience Israel’s brutal response.

Looked at from Israel’s rightwing, though, a third intifada would be Israel’s way out of the Jordanian option which ostensibly places an ultimate limit on Israel’s expansion. I use “ostensibly” for good reason. The Jordanian option leaves the major settlements intact. This means that the Palestinian population centers – call them Bantustans or ghettos – would be surrounded by Israeli and Jordanian power forever.

What is most remarkable according to my sources is that the Palestinian negotiators, even after the Oslo Accords, don’t realize that Israel will dot every “i” and cross every “t” in any final status agreement. The Israeli squeeze on Palestinian life will continue after the signing. Anyone who thinks a signed agreement will stop Israel at Palestine’s official border is crazy. An Israeli signed final status Jordanian option will make Oslo seem loose and unfocused.

Palestinians and leftwing Jewish intellectuals and activists thought that Israel as a Western-oriented colonial power could not ultimately succeed in the second half of the 20th century. Israel was on the wrong side of history. They were wrong.

In the 21st century, they continue to think Israel’s victory is impossible. If my sources are right and the Jordanian option is signed, these intellectuals are wrong as well.

Marc H. Ellis
About Marc H. Ellis

Marc H. Ellis is Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of the Global Prophetic. His latest book is Finding Our Voice: Embodying the Prophetic and Other Misadventures.

Other posts by .


Posted In:

26 Responses

  1. Walid
    Walid
    November 27, 2013, 11:06 am

    “Palestinians go where they want for the reasons they want. Then there will be a Jordanian way in for travel and trade, again not (officially) controlled by Israel. The world will open up for Palestinians. Severely restricted space and opportunity will seem less onerous.” (Marc H. Ellis)

    Second day in row about Jordan under the cover of something or other discussed at the croissant table with Viola in Vienna. Marc is now into over selling a concept that seems close to his heart. His above scenario falls somewhere between the pollyanish and the absurd. Jordan is itself not out of the woods with its own fundies, more than flat broke, hardly has the barest of minimum water to get by, and Marc would parachute an additional 3 million people into it all bringing in zero assets but tons of liabilities. The proposal doesn’t solve the Palestinians’ problems, it turns Jordan into another Gaza.

    • seafoid
      seafoid
      November 27, 2013, 12:10 pm

      The Jordan option is a Zionist fantasy.
      Like the other Jordan .

      http://www.dailydesktop.eu/data/media/504/Katie_Jordan_Price_3897_Wallpaper.jpg

      Totally unnatural, blown up out of all proportion etc ,

    • pabelmont
      pabelmont
      November 27, 2013, 12:15 pm

      Walid: Glad you mentioned water. Israel’s whole (long-continuing) land-grab has been argued as religious, and may seem so to the true-believers, but the Ben Gurion-istas will recognize it as a desperate quest for water (early Zionists wanted their boundary to encompass Lebanon’s Litani river).

      If Jordan is broke (and why not? Most countries are broke, and Jordan has little water), then why would it take on new responsibilities and augment a somewhat fractious Palestinian population — at the moment that those Palestinians are being permanently and finally dispossessed by Israel?

      Follow the money.

      • Walid
        Walid
        November 27, 2013, 1:28 pm

        pabelmont, my mouth is dry from talking about the water that Israel has been stealing since 1951. You’re 101% right that it’s about the water and not at all about some religious mumbo-jumbo. Same problem with the theft of the Golan that’s the source of about 25% of the water being consumed in Israel. Back on the West Bank and those squatting settlements that gave rise to the thieving despicable wall, they and the damn wall were strategically located to incorporate the 3 West Bank aquifers from which Israel is currently stealing 50% of the total water being consumed in Israel proper and its squatter settlements, leaving absolutely shit for the Palestinians in the minor A and B areas. As if wrapping a wall around the aquifers wasn’t enough, the wall of shame also incorporated within it the main wells that the Palestinians needed for their crops, which effectively killed the agrarian Palestinian sector of its society. Here’s about the aquifers from Ami Isseroff dated from 10 years back but the situation is surely worse now because of the increase in Israeli and squatter populations and the depletion:

        “West Bank Water Resources

        The Israeli occupied West bank includes scarce water resources. The three principle underground aquifers of Palestine, marked in dark blue on the map, are found largely in the West Bank. These mountain aquifer areas have a water saturated substratum 200-600 meters deep. Light blue areas indicate land with less water, in which the thickness of the saturated subterranean stratum is no greater than 200 meters, with low potential water yield. Violet areas have little or no water.

        The mountain aquifers are:

        Yarkon-Tanninim Aquifer (1) This supplies Israel with about 340 million cubic meters of water annually, which are used by the Jerusalem-Tel-Aviv area. Palestinians use about 20 million cubic meters a year.

        Nablus-Gilboa Aquifer (2) This supplies Israel with about 115 million cubic meters a year, largely for agricultural irrigation in the kibbutzim (communes) and moshavim (cooperative settlements) in Galilee.

        The Eastern Aquifer (3) . This supplies about 40 million cubic meters annually to the Israeli settlements in the Jordan Valley, and about 60 million cubic meters to the Palestinians.

        Israeli planners consider that the Yarkon-Taninim Aquifer is vital to Israeli water needs, and therefore would like to retain control of settlement blocks over that area, adjacent to the so called “center” of Israel, the Gush Dan area. It should be noted that Israel’s water supply always came from these Aquifers, both during mandate times and when the land was held by Jordan.

        More about Water”

        Ami Isseroff

        http://www.mideastweb.org/westbankwater.htm

    • Danaa
      Danaa
      November 27, 2013, 2:34 pm

      Walid, you are misrepresenting marc Ellis’ position when you call it “selling”. Nowhere did he in any way indicate he would be OK with a “Jordanian option”. Quite the opposite. His position appears one of apprehension at the machinations behind the scene, feverishly working to weaken palestinian resolve and civil societies.

      What he worries about – and you should worry too – is that Abbas, a putative, unelected “representative” of the palestinians is perfectly capable of selling out the palestinian interests for the sake of “economic peace”. behind Abbas is a cadre of palestinian well-to-do’s who are increasingly alienated from the Palestinian masses who are doing all the suffering. fact is, fayyad and Abbas are able to get through check points rather swiftly. they can look around in ramallah and not see any olive trees being uprooted in Area B or the expulsion of palestinians from Area C, jerusalem and the jordan valley.

      Ever it was so that the more well-to-do are relatively easy to convince that “land doesn’t matter” and that reality is what it is. Comfort has a strange way of erasing revolutionary zeal – just look around at the US economic landscape, which betrays a decided turn towards neo-feudalism.

      Obviously, what marc has been hearing (and he is far from the only one hearing rumors about the upcoming “interim” peace) comes from well within the Palestinian civil society, and in particular, segments that are more faith oriented,, since that’s the conference he went to. You can’t take away from him that he heard murmors because I am hearing them too, and am way on the outside (of faith, if not society).

      if you look again at Marc’s piece from yesterday you’ll see the despair behind the scenes. After all, any interim “agreement” by Abbas and cohorts will come with pressure on Palestinian activists and the many people of conscience outside Palestine to abandon BDS, to abandon the quest for human rights, to turn from the fight for Palestinian statehood in the interest of “normalcy”. hFar from supporting the jordanian “option” he fears the wedge that even waving around such options comes wrapped in. That it is israel brandishing this latest weapon in an increasingly depleted arsenal is beside the point. But we should pay attention to the many creative ways – new and old – israel, and rabid “friends” abroad, come up with in this 40+ year long campaign to crush the palestinian spirit.

      • Walid
        Walid
        November 27, 2013, 3:32 pm

        Dana, I read both articles more than once to make sure of what I was getting out of them. In the first one of yesterday, he was oscillating between it being good and bad for both Palestinians and Israelis and signaling something of an end to the Jewish quest of something since the move to Jordan would mean the final capitulation of the Palestinians and also the end of the demographic risks that keeps Israelis spooked. Today he again came with both messages but leaning heavier on the prospect of it being rather positive for the Palestinians because it would give them a limited freedom of movement, which would be great compared to the zero freedom of today.

        Marc is definitely on a selling mission but since he never engages in discussions here, we’ll never know what was really on his mind and he leaves us guessing, especialy with his cryptic prophetic stuff. I’m giving an interpretation and so are you; only Marc could say which is the right one, if any as we both could be wrong..

        BTW, I’m sure that Abbas and Fayyad have already sold the company store.

      • Danaa
        Danaa
        November 27, 2013, 4:21 pm

        Walid, you are right on that one point – only marc himself can interpret what his own position is vis-a-vis a “Jordanian option” and “normalcy”. I am actually surprised he chooses never to engage with anyone here, if only to correct misconceptions about his positions. May be we are not “academic” enough for him, or may be we are just low on some theological totem pole. After all, I never did see a comment (mine included) that showed genuine willingness to engage on the “prophetic” concept. Or the “exilic” for that matter. Or, what’s more likely, not everyone can or wants to take the time to engage with some commenters on an on-line blog.

        I still happen to think however that he is more worried than accepting of a capitulation by Palestinians for the sake of “normalcy’. I note that in his previous post he specifically mentioned that such an a”agreement” (ie capitulation) will likely pull the rugs from underneath Jews of Conscience too, not just the palestinian civil society’s call for BDS. I thought that comment was interesting on its own as it discloses, perhaps inadvertently, the weakness underlying the premise of universal right advocacy. It would lead someone like me, a decidedly not a person of faith, to ask – is “concsience” really such a toothless, inconsequential aspect in human affairs that a small wind, a little huff and puff, is enough to blow it all away?

        Yes, the palestinians have every right to lead the way in the battle for their own rights. But if the “other side”, the brutish adversary, finds a way to cordon them all off – mentally and physically, must we all stop the fight for rights, including those they were forced to renounce in the face of torture and pressure?

        To me, this is a really important question, as it has to do with my continuing puzzlement over the relative silence from the people of conscience (including jewish ones) with regards to the intolerable situation of Palestinians in Gaza. Where are the great voices of the left when children there must wade through sewage to get to school? when fishermen are shot and power stations go dark? yes, we have posts on MW – but where else? where is Peter Beinart? where is Medea Benjamin (yes, I know she does outstanding job advocating against those horrid drones raining on powerless people in remote lands)? where is Bill Moyers? and where, oh where are the interfaith groups?

        Israel. for its part takes good notice of that silence, the effective shut-down of any and all debate about the extreme injustice of shutting people off in an internment camp (if not quite concentration camp, at least not quite yet). from the ubiquitous silence, Israel infers that “conscience” has its limits, and can be managed, if not entirely ignored. From that the great minds of israel seek to draw lessons about the west bank and jerusalem. In the end, it’s what you can get away with, isn’t it?

        And that’s where my issue is with what I see as Marc Ellis’ position – if he is willing to concede defeat and fold up his “Jews of Conscience” tent at the first sign of the ill wind of defeatism in the Palestinian street, what is there for the great leaders of the “Jewish” state to worry about?

        Whether or not Marc chooses to take anyone on here, I think he should clarify his own take on these matters somewhere, sometime.

      • Walid
        Walid
        November 28, 2013, 1:47 am

        Super as usual, Danaa, hope others here read it. We agree it’s annoying not getting any replies or reactions to our comments from authors of articles written specifically for MW; can’t say if it’s simply lack of courtesy or downright arrogance, either way it’s a stinker.

        Getting back to the subliminal messages Marc is conveying, going back to the first article, he states:

        “… After all, though I have struggled within the prophetic tradition of my own people, for all practical purposes the Palestinian Authority signing on the dotted line means the end of the Jewish struggle. The explosion of the Jewish prophetic over Palestine – which represents a final “no” to the ultimate assimilation of Jews to unjust power – loses its base of operation.
        Still in exile, and deeper still, Jews of Conscience will be adrift. For generations to come the Jewish prophetic will lie dormant. It might never return.”

        He is saying, or rather is he saying that by the Palestinians accepting assimilation into an expanded Jordan, it signifies the end of the Jewish struggle and the “explosion’ of the prophetic (whatever that is) over Palestine? He follows it up with a sentence to the effect that those Jews still in exile, such as yourself, will continue to drift, never ever to have a chance at grasping the prophetic (whatever that is).

        And here I was thinking all along that you, Phil, and so many other Jews are perfectly happy to be living where you are now and not feeling that you are drifting anywhere. I understood Marc to be saying that you guys will continue being losers.

      • LeaNder
        LeaNder
        November 28, 2013, 7:15 am

        He is saying, or rather is he saying that by the Palestinians accepting assimilation into an expanded Jordan, it signifies the end of the Jewish struggle and the “explosion’ of the prophetic (whatever that is) over Palestine?

        No Walid, you completely misinterpreting him, I think.

        I was serious. After all, though I have struggled within the prophetic tradition of my own people, for all practical purposes the Palestinian Authority signing on the dotted line means the end of the Jewish struggle. The explosion of the Jewish prophetic over Palestine – which represents a final “no” to the ultimate assimilation of Jews to unjust power – loses its base of operation.

        The prophetic tradition is simply the stream in Jewish history to challenge power with ethics. Once the Jordanian plan is put in place, the Jewish voices, the ones representing the tradition of the prophetic, has lost. It has lost it’s “base of operation”. And yes, it base of operation is not some type of “solution to the Palestinian problem”, some type of biopolitics, but a struggle to force power to admit and accept their rights, instead of allowing them to deal with Palestinians as a faceless mass of “Arabs” that can be pushed into any other Arab country one wishes.

      • LeaNder
        LeaNder
        November 28, 2013, 7:19 am

        No more editing possible, I forget. Did I rely on it too extensively, due to the absence of a preview option.

        wrong: the ones representing the tradition of the prophetic, has lost.
        correct: … the Jewish voices, the ones representing the tradition of the prophetic, have lost.

        Maybe I should have added “too”, not only the Palestinians would loose, but also the ones inside the Jewish community that believe in challenging power with ethics.

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        November 28, 2013, 9:35 am

        Danaa:

        And that’s where my issue is with what I see as Marc Ellis’ position – if he is willing to concede defeat and fold up his “Jews of Conscience” tent at the first sign of the ill wind of defeatism in the Palestinian street, what is there for the great leaders of the “Jewish” state to worry about?

        Jews of Crypto-Conscience?

        (But what if it is acknowledgment of defeat, rather than a concession? I.e. what if defeat is no longer a prospect but a reality?)

      • Sibiriak
        Sibiriak
        November 28, 2013, 10:08 pm

        Walid:

        [Ellis:] “…for all practical purposes the Palestinian Authority signing on the dotted line means the end of the Jewish struggle. The explosion of the Jewish prophetic over Palestine – which represents a final “no” to the ultimate assimilation of Jews to unjust power – loses its base of operation.

        Still in exile, and deeper still, Jews of Conscience will be adrift. For generations to come the Jewish prophetic will lie dormant. It might never return.”

        He is saying, or rather is he saying that by the Palestinians accepting assimilation into an expanded Jordan, it signifies the end of the Jewish struggle…

        Yes, that’s what he is saying.

        and the “explosion’ of the prophetic (whatever that is) over Palestine?

        The “explosion of the Jewish prophetic over Palestine” refers, if my cryptanalysis is correct, to the spread of genuine Jewish ethics–anti-Zionism, human rights, freedom–over Palestine That Jewish ethical “explosion” will end because “Palestine” will cease to exist as a “base of operation” when the Greater Israel Project is successfully completed.

        He follows it up with a sentence to the effect that those Jews still in exile, such as yourself, will continue to drift, never ever to have a chance at grasping the prophetic (whatever that is).

        My reading of Ellis’ crypto-prophetic-exilic is:

        “Palestine” (anti-Zionism) is The Cause for “Jews of Conscience” who are in “exile” (exiled from what Home? A just Jewish world).

        When Final Defeat eliminates The Cause, these Jewish Prophets (speakers of Jewish Moral Truth against Immoral Jewish Power) and fellow travelers will find themselves morally adrift, it being pointless to continue The Struggle against a fait accompli.

    • Naftush
      Naftush
      November 28, 2013, 8:22 am

      I see nothing in the article, and have never heard anything elsewhere, about allowing, enticing, or forcing any Palestinian Arab, let alone 3 million, to relocate to Jordan. I do see the recurrent Ellisian anguish over anything that might attenuate the conflict without obliterating Jewish nation-statehood.

      • LeaNder
        LeaNder
        November 28, 2013, 11:41 am

        Naftush, now I understand, maybe Walid hasn’t either. You both could surrender to some type of blame-the-messenger scenario.

        You could start with facts on the ground before 1967. No? That was a some type of precursor of the Jordanian solution. I have never read Avi Shlaim’s research on Jordan, if I had I could probably tell you more about the larger historical context. Whatever else I remember, I better leave out, since my memories are too vague. In any case this no way is the first time I heard about it. What is new for me is that Ellis seems to have a strong feeling there could be something more imminent plans in the making. But even in this context, I seem to have heard others refer to this. I have no idea if the rumor is based on something more solid though, sometimes rumors are.

      • Walid
        Walid
        November 28, 2013, 2:10 pm

        “maybe Walid hasn’t either”.

        I can recognize something being peddled. I don’t remember anything about Shlaim having to do with Jordan other than his writing about its pre-war collusion with the Zionists by which when the war would break out, the Jordanians would take the West Bank without any effective Zionist opposition and in return, the Zionist would take the rest of Palestine with very little Jordanian opposition. What wasn’t in the pre-war plan was Jordan’s taking of East Jerusalem. Maybe Shlaim wrote about the Jericho Conference when the West Bank leaders pledged their allegiance to the Jordanian King while the Gazans were siding with the Egyptians in the inevitable war that was about to break out..

      • LeaNder
        LeaNder
        November 28, 2013, 6:18 pm

        Yes, Walid, that is what I have in mind:
        The Politics of Partition: King Abdullah, the Zionists, and Palestine 1921-1951
        Lion of Jordan: The Life of King Hussein in War and Peace

        They definitively have a special type of relationship with Israel, I seem to remember “Israel’s best enemy” in this context. In any case he seems the specialist on Jordan and he is not a hard core supporter of Israel’s pre- and post 1967 politics and much more frank about it than others.

        If you know of any books from the Palestinian and/or Arab perspective on the issue that are available in either French or English, I would appreciate a hint.

        I can recognize something being peddled.

        He sounded more concerned than peddling something. I liked some of his recent articles but I have not read all. Besides I wouldn’t put it past the present Israeli government to at least play with the idea. Would you? But couldn’t the recent project at economic cross border cooperation trigger rumors that there may be more in the making too?

      • Walid
        Walid
        November 29, 2013, 12:06 am

        LeaNder, I don’t know a book on this taboo subject, likewise one talking about sales of Palestinian lands by Arabs to Jews. The long history of the Hashemites with the Zionists going back to 1920 is known but not talked about. But the Hashemites weren’t alone, the Saudis were also involved in talks about transfering Palestinians to Iraq for cash and others involving exchanging Palestinians for Iraqi Jews and both ending in failure.

        The border factories are something else. They’re to by-pass the bogus embargo on Israeli-produced goods by labelling them “made in Jordan”. The added benefit to Israel is the low cost of labour ($500/mo) in Jordan. Sounds like the start of a new ugly relationship that could be reminiscent of the negative effects of the NAFTA maquiladoras.

  2. James Canning
    James Canning
    November 27, 2013, 2:13 pm

    Abdullah II, the King of Jordan, comprehends that Jordanian control of any part of the West Bank, would be dangerous for Jordan.

    A number of neocons have promoted Jordanian annexation of parts of the West Bank, or control of parts of WB, to facilitate growth of Israel (beyond “1967” borders).

  3. Stephen Shenfield
    Stephen Shenfield
    November 27, 2013, 4:33 pm

    Two questions. The Jordanian government has stated repeatedly and emphatically that it does not want to assume the burden of the West Bank again. Should we not take these statements at face value? Or are those who continue to push the “Jordanian option” just ignoring reality?

    Second, if there is a real Jordanian option what happens to the Jordan Valley? Is Israeli withdrawal from it part of the deal? Reports on Mondoweiss indicate a significant Israeli economic interest in keeping the valley. Could there be a viable Jordanian option with Israel still in control of the Jordan Valley? In that case Israel and not Jordan would still directly control the border.

    • Walid
      Walid
      November 28, 2013, 2:31 am

      “Or are those who continue to push the “Jordanian option” just ignoring reality?”

      Stephen, it’s not out of ignorance, they are just pushing and pushing at what seems to them (Israelis) as their only chance of getting rid of the Palestinians. About your viability question, it’s been made made categorically clear by Netanyahu and others that there is no way Israel would ever abandon the valley. It desperately needs it for its fertile soil and to have control over the water flowing over and under it. In a nutshell, it wants to dump the wall-fractured areas A, B, and some minor inconsequential parts of C excluding the valley on to Jordan that already is not that greatly fertile to feed 8 million people. Maybe Israel is figuring on making a bundle selling the Jordanians some its expensive desalinated water; it’s already doing that in the norther WB where it’s stealing the Palestinians’ aquifer water to transport it to Israel and forcing the Palestinian peons to buy from them the more expensive desalinated water.

      Maybe in the proposed deal, Israel would allow Jordan to fully and freely exploit its uranium resources. 3 years ago, great uranium deposits were discovered in Jordan that supposedly would have turned it from being a borrower nation to a lending one. At the time Israel raised a stink and objected with US support to letting the Jordanians mine it. Finally under some mysterious conditions or acceptances by Israel/US, Jordan began exploration with the French mining company AREVA but 3 weeks ago, Jordan terminated the contract and it’s now back to square one. All this to say that if the Palestinian issue is to be discussed with Jordan, freedom to mine the uranium would surely play a big part in swaying the Jordanians.

      Does a greater Jordan imply that the million or so Palestinian refugees in the camps of Syria ad Lebanon would be repatriated to it, or is it a “screw-them” thing that they are thinking of?

  4. mcohen
    mcohen
    November 28, 2013, 12:55 am

    Danaa says

    “relative silence from the people of conscience”

    The suicide bombing campaign of 2001 onwards was a tactical mistake and largely alienated potential supporters of the palestinian cause.the wall and the settlements that followed were a direct result.
    the slaughter of innocent civilians on egged buses only hardened peoples attitudes and the fact that the israelis continued to use the buses regardless sent a powerful message to the outside world

    • Naftush
      Naftush
      November 28, 2013, 8:31 am

      By calling the suicide bombing campaign a tactical mistake, you exclude yourself from the population of persons of conscience. The campaign was an atrocity per se and a eye-opener for nearly all Israelis, including those of pro-Palestinian sympathies, in regard of the Palestinian cause itself.

      • Sumud
        Sumud
        November 28, 2013, 10:31 am

        Presumably you will not hesitate to condemn Israel’s bloodbath in Gaza which commenced in late 2008 – you are a “person of conscience”, right?

        You will have no trouble acknowledging “the campaign was an atrocity per se” given the fact Israel killed more people – civilians – in 22 days than Palestinians did in 15 years of suicide bombings.

        It was an eye-opener for people of the world.

  5. Sibiriak
    Sibiriak
    November 28, 2013, 9:47 am

    So Israel succeeds with its Greater Israel project? History won’t end. There will be still be Jewish misdeeds aplenty for Jews of Conscience to be conscientious about.

  6. ivri
    ivri
    November 28, 2013, 12:10 pm

    I am not surprised by Marc`s anguish. It seemed so logical that this miniature piece of land will not survive the many pressure forms applied against it: Intifadas, terror, in the UN, embargos, wars and what not. Just push hard enough and persevere and you have it – and this was indeed the prevalent mindset in involved circles. What they ignored is the inherent fragility of the Arab monolith that drove the crusade and how the effects of that will change the calculations. In addition, size stopped to matter that much: in the new general conditions big and small can be devastated with not so much different efforts. Then there was the fundamental switch of the US in its attitudes to the main players here. You start to add all that up (plus the present try to neutralize Iran as an active player in the game) it become clear that over the 6-7 decades of the existence of Israel tectonic changes have taken place and what is reported in this article is the unsurprising consequence of that. In fact, a reverse rephrasing of the above may now apply, namely (for Israel): push hard enough and persevere and you will have it.

    • Walid
      Walid
      November 29, 2013, 12:21 am

      Ivri, my heart bleeds for you, especially that you feel that the US has now abandoned you. Rather than “miniature piece of land” a more descriptive tear-jerker is “sliver of land”.

Leave a Reply