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NYT’s Rudoren says Mondoweiss critique of her recent article is ‘nuts’

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Jodi Rudoren of the New York Times has responded directly to our sharp critique of her recent article about wine-making in Israel/Palestine. In an interview today with HuffPostLive, she called our post “nuts,” and dismissed our point about the Jewish National Fund, which is the major funder of the effort to recreate ancient wine. “They said that I didn’t talk about the JNF, the Jewish National Fund, that was responsible for the uprooting of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians,” she said. “Well, I didn’t. That’s background that’s not really relevant to the story, but I did put in that it’s funded by the Jewish National Fund, and people can find other articles about the Jewish National Fund that would give more background.” (Rudoren’s defense of her article starts at about 11:30 in the video.)

But you won’t find many of those “other articles about the Jewish National Fund” in the New York Times. Patrick Connors, a friend of this site, did a search of the Times‘ archives. Here’s some of what he found; Jodi Rudoren “never wrote about the JNF during her entire tenure, nor did anyone she supervises, except for Isabel [Kershner] in 2012 in a puff piece, and the NYT almost never talks about the JNF and its role in dispossessing Palestinians.”

Connors did, however, find one part of the paper in which the JNF is mentioned frequently. He discovers, “You will find tens of people requesting donations be made to the JNF in paid obituaries in the NYT.”

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57 Responses

  1. W.Jones
    W.Jones
    December 1, 2015, 6:32 pm

    Her article was basically promoting the wine company, talking about how it was indigenous wine, etc.

    “With a budget of about $750,000, mainly from the Jewish National Fund — a century-old Zionist organization that has helped transform Israel’s agricultural landscape” ~Rudoren.

    It just sounds from this like JNF is a normal economic or charitable development fund that means not much more than its name, kind of like the UNDP’s funds, YMCA, or United Way.

    • inbound39
      inbound39
      December 2, 2015, 12:44 am

      I find it a huge stretch to say that wine made by European Zionist immigrants is indigenous. How many Zionists are indigenous….not many if any.

      • Krauss
        Krauss
        December 2, 2015, 9:08 am

        Maybe, but the idea isn’t as crazy as Rudoren’s “defence”.

        The NYT and Rudoren are openly pro-Jewish Apartheid. Why is this not a bigger deal among the American left? It’s amazing to me and continues to amaze me.

      • Les
        Les
        December 2, 2015, 8:26 pm

        Zionists are indigenous exclusively to Europe and the US.

    • Emory Riddle
      Emory Riddle
      December 2, 2015, 3:24 pm

      What kind of “journalist’ would not give the background of the JNF with this story.

      How absolutely pathetic.

      Real journalists can no longer work in the mainstream media.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        December 3, 2015, 10:35 am

        Would be great if a media watch group would scrutinize her articles.
        FAIR — FAIR is the national progressive media watchdog …

        fair.org/

  2. a blah chick
    a blah chick
    December 1, 2015, 7:17 pm

    “They said that I didn’t talk about the JNF, the Jewish National Fund, that was responsible for the uprooting of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians,” she said. “Well, I didn’t. That’s background that’s not really relevant to the story”

    So mentioning HOW the JNF acquire all that land to make their crappy wine is not relevant to the story. That is some world class cluelessness right there.

    Jodi, please leave now. And don’t let the door hit ya.

    • echinococcus
      echinococcus
      December 2, 2015, 1:05 am

      It’s not about just Jodi the rude Oren.
      Time to boycott the NYFT.
      Nothing to see there that may be any better than poison tabloids. Ignore it. With enough ignoring it may well sink.

    • Kathleen
      Kathleen
      December 2, 2015, 12:44 pm

      And she claims during the interview that her job is to help “connect what happened before and what might happen in the future”…..right

    • joemowrey
      joemowrey
      December 2, 2015, 3:08 pm

      It’s sort of like if someone wrote an article about Charles Manson’s tattoos without mentioning his cult behaviors, because, after all, that information is only “background”

      No, Rudorin is not clueless at all. She knows exactly what she’s doing. This type of propaganda is her stock in trade.

  3. pabelmont
    pabelmont
    December 1, 2015, 8:04 pm

    Well, at least (it seems) she spelled Mondoweiss right!

  4. DaBakr
    DaBakr
    December 1, 2015, 8:21 pm

    PW has been griping about the nyt for so long he is simply pleased as punch that his baby MW got another mention in the rag. the fact he/it was called “nuts” doesn’t matter one bit to him

    • Boo
      Boo
      December 2, 2015, 11:37 am

      Well, after all, consider the source. And her language was so professional, too.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        December 2, 2015, 12:45 pm

        Jodi “clear notion of what I am here to do” MW has been shining the light on that “notion”

    • JWalters
      JWalters
      December 2, 2015, 6:06 pm

      Correction – “PW has been reporting the FACTS about the nyt …” Evidence that the facts are finally having an effect is something I am also pleased about.

  5. talknic
    talknic
    December 2, 2015, 12:10 am

    http://wp.me/pDB7k-Yr

    How many times have you heard “Jewish settlers and the JNF purchased “territory” in Palestine “

    In the spring of 1903 JNF-KKL purchased its first parcel of land: 50 acres in Hadera with funds given as a gift by the well-known philanthropist Isaac (Yitzhak Leib) Goldberg”

    “By 1905, JNF-KKL’s land holdings had expanded to include land near the Sea of Galilee, and at Ben Shemen in the center of the country”

    By 1921, JNF-KKL purchases of land had quadrupled its land holdings, bringing them up to 25,000 acres”

    Again, from the Israeli Land Fund

    The State of Israel today was built on land which was legally purchased by Jewish organizations such as the Jewish National Fund (JNF) and other private individuals.”

    As always, the Hasbara has a gaping big hole. The Jewish National Fund trips up on its own lies. The JNF also says:

    “These are not State lands

    Land is ‘real estate’. ‘Real estate’ is not ‘territory’. Japanese, Chinese, US and other foreign companies own real estate in Australia. They cannot vote, do not have citizenship and have no territorial rights what so ever in Australia. The same goes for all other states.

    Not a single cent was paid for the territory of the State of Israel.

    • inbound39
      inbound39
      December 2, 2015, 12:46 am

      It also pays to keep in mind that at the time the Provisional Government of Israel accepted the Partition Plan the JNF owned less than ten percent of the land.

      • talknic
        talknic
        December 4, 2015, 10:41 pm

        @ inbound39 “It also pays to keep in mind that at the time the Provisional Government of Israel accepted the Partition Plan the JNF owned less than ten percent of the land”

        Bearing in mind that the ‘land’ owning JNF was not a citizen of any part of the ‘territory’.

  6. pgtl10
    pgtl10
    December 2, 2015, 1:09 am

    I just want point out that Palestinians have a long history with alcohol. My family would buy grapes from a Muslimobile family and make wine for churches. In the village of Taybeh there’s is a brewery. Even the NY Times mentioned Palestinian vineyard and distillery in Bethlehem.

    In Ramallah (my hometown ) there is an arak maker which is an alcoholic drink made with grapes and anise seeds.

    Jodi Rudored tries to use the Muslim prohibition against drinking as an excuse to claim Zionism created alcohol in the region. I’ll remember that the next time I order a drink in a Ramallah restaurant.

    • can of worms
      can of worms
      December 2, 2015, 3:19 am

      True. So perhaps this would be a fitting place to recall how another apartheid state, South Africa, tried to influence international opinion about apartheid, by buying newspapers that would distort and ‘omit’ reality and extol the virtues of the apartheid state to the world.

      “Moving well beyond the standard….activities like gauzy, sympathetic films about the country’s cultural heritage and breezy, colourful magazines and cheerful press releases [it was] agreed the time was right to finance a no-holds-barred…campaign of psychological warfare against foreign opinion – and foreign opinion makers. The ends – protecting the Apartheid state – would justify the means…”
      http://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2013-01-29-apartheids-infogate-fresh-and-relevant-after-all-these-years/#.Vl6enNIrLAU

      “The [‘Muldergate’] plan entailed bribes of international news agencies and the purchase of the Washington Star newspaper and the secret establishment of a government controlled newspaper…..”
      http://www.sahistory.org.za/topic/information-scandal#sthash.kZfKv4fB.dpuf

      This is what apartheid does : apartheid ultimately needs to market itself to the world through the MSM at any cost, and be cheap and trashy…

      • JWalters
        JWalters
        December 2, 2015, 8:56 pm

        Thanks for that extremely relevant and interesting story.

    • December 2, 2015, 5:17 am

      No, Palestinians do not have such a long history with alcohol. You can’t take a small section of society whose practices and culture goes against the mainstream grain, and make them the representative of the whole. Consumption and production of alcoholic drinks have long been negatively viewed by the not only majority of Palestinians, but also most in the Arab world since the times of Prophet Muhammad.

      How is this any different from saying terrorism have a strong root in Islam because certain passages out of thousands in the Quran seemingly allude to it?

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        December 2, 2015, 1:12 pm

        “You can’t take a small section of society whose practices and culture goes against the mainstream grain,”

        Oh I see. Only a few Palestinians make wine from grapes, most, the mainstream, distill whiskey or rye from grain. Good to know.

      • Yossarian22
        Yossarian22
        December 2, 2015, 1:38 pm

        Not all Palestinians are Muslim, you know. Palestine has long included important populations of Jews and Christians and those religions have no prohibitions against alcohol(in fact, wine in particular is an important part of many rituals for both.) Moreover, although this varied from region to region and regime to regime, Islamic governments have typically permitted non-Muslims to cultivate, buy and drink alcohol. A little googling showed me that the Levant had a lot of viniculture associated with monasteries during this period. And during the Islamic Middle Ages, wine was also cultivated for non-alcoholic purposes(producing vinegar, alchemy, production of perfumes) by Muslims and it was even the Arabs who invented distillation and brandy. So to say that wine cultivation ended in Palestine with the advent of the Islamic Empire is, it seems, simplistic at best. If you have evidence to the contrary(I’m obviously not a specialist on alcohol in Medieval Islamic culture.) I’d love to see it.

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        December 2, 2015, 2:57 pm

        Yossarian,

        That silly goose couldn’t even do ten seconds of homework. She would have learned from anyone that among Muslims, too, the use of wine and arraq has fluctuated enormously according to the times and the Sultan in charge. Palestine was never a dry zone, at least before the collapse of the Resistance and the adoption of “modern”, ostentative religion. Anyone visiting Turkey or the Lebanon in the 70es would have found the dietary habits even better irrigated than in Italy or Greece. She’s been in Palestine for years and has never heard of the wines of Lebanon, the Syrian or Palestinian arraq, and the drinking parties that used to be set up every night before the Zionist occupation pushed goddam religion on the people? Journalist, she calls herself, eh?

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        December 2, 2015, 8:18 pm

        “it was even the Arabs who invented distillation and brandy.”

        The history of distillation is rather uncertain. (Perhaps the historians who noted it had imbibed too much of the product.) Chinese and Indian distillation practice certainly preceded the work of the Arab chemists, and there are hints that even the Chinese and the Indians were following even more ancient distillers.

        But the use of the alembic (itself an Arab invention?) and the development of modern distillation methods does pretty clearly derive from Arabic practice.

      • annie
        annie
        December 2, 2015, 8:49 pm

        But the use of the alembic (itself an Arab invention?) and the development of modern distillation methods does pretty clearly derive from Arabic practice.

        probably persian invention:

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alembic

        History[edit]
        The earliest appearances of alembics are to be found in the works of ancient Persian alchemists,[3] such as Jabir al-Tusi (Geber). Muhammad ibn Zakariya al-Razi, who conducted the first documented scientific studies on distillation, used alembics in his scientific work.[4] This work was extended during the Middle Ages by Muslim alchemists like Avicenna and Al-Farabi.

      • Les
        Les
        December 2, 2015, 8:31 pm

        I am sure I am not alone in knowing Muslims who are not abstainers. But then I also know Jews who eat pork.

      • December 2, 2015, 9:56 pm

        Good points Yossarian, and I agree with all of them. It is just how when someone says “Palestinians have a long and rich history with alcohol”, it paints a totally skewed picture of the actual reality on cultural attitudes towards alcohol in Palestine. Sure, there a pockets of people within the greater society who absolutely love everything about alcoholic drinks, from the drink to the production to its own microculture. However, outside of the group, there are still strong cultural attitudes that are against production and consumption of alcohol.

        I suppose the saying would have been more correct if it specified the sub-culture within Palestinians that are most accepting of alcoholic drinks. Because when more than 50% of the general population hold negative views toward alcohol, it is simply a false statement to say Palestinians have rich history with the substance.

      • annie
        annie
        December 2, 2015, 10:25 pm

        It is just how when someone says “Palestinians have a long and rich history with alcohol”, it paints a totally skewed picture of the actual reality on cultural attitudes towards alcohol in Palestine.

        and it is just how when someone says “Palestinians have a long and rich history with” christianity, it paints a totally skewed picture of the actual reality on cultural attitudes towards Christianity in Palestine?

        Sure, there a pockets of people within the greater society who absolutely love everything about alcoholic drinks, from the drink to the production to its own microculture. However, outside of the group, there are still strong cultural attitudes that are against production and consumption of alcohol.

        first of all, it is not a minor “group”. and the fact there may be “strong .. attitudes that are against production and consumption of alcohol” is irrelevant. after all there are “strong..attitudes” that are against consumption of alcohol in lots of societies.

        when i was in southern lebanon staying with a (secular – muslim heritage) family we (not everyone) enjoyed a glass of wine almost every evening. when i got there i wanted to buy a gift for the family so i got them a case of wine. we drove to a christian store and bought it. the store was on the main drag in the neighboring town. this was in southern lebanon, hezbollah country. there may have been “strong cultural attitudes” against personal usage, but it didn’t appear to be spilling over into the general culture. live and let live.

        and stop digging that hole you seem so stuck in. or add some supporting links or something.

      • annie
        annie
        December 3, 2015, 12:47 am

        or add some supporting links or something.

        like this: http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2009/sep/13/farming-in-palestine

        Palestinians love to eat, and their legendary hospitality is boundless. Somewhat counter-intuitively, given that Palestine’s main religion is Islam, many Palestinians also like a drink. Historically Palestine has been a diverse, pluralist, tolerant culture, a mix of Muslims, Jews and Christians with Bedouin and Ottoman influences. Attitudes to alcohol are relaxed, and Palestinians make a range of beers at the Taybeh microbrewery, between Ramallah and Jericho, along with wine and brandy at the Cremisan vineyard on the outskirts of Bethlehem, an area with a history of wine-making dating back to the Iron Age.

        Anywhere other than Palestine, Cremisan winery, with its magnificent chateau-like building that dates back to 1885 and its painstakingly constructed terraced vineyards, would be a heritage site with Grade A listing, and its wines – especially its “hock”, which is made from Palestinian grape varieties and resembles a good Austrian Grüner Veltliner – would earn favourable mentions in international wine magazines. But since currently Palestine is neither a country nor a state in the usual sense, it enjoys no such protection.

        Cremisan is sandwiched between two Israeli settlements. It is earmarked to become part of Israel behind the infamous “separation wall”. More than twice the height of the Berlin wall in all its 25ft-high, brutal, grey concrete and razor-wire ugliness, complete with sniper towers, electric sensors, thermal imaging, surveillance cameras and checkpoints patrolled by young Israeli soldiers with guns, it is only 60% complete. Once finished, it will encircle the winery and cut it off from its neighbouring Palestinian village, although it is much closer to it than the settlements. The only thing holding up its completion is the opposition of the Italian Salesian fathers who currently run the winery using a Palestinian workforce, and the intervention on their behalf of the Vatican. “We can speak out more than the Palestinians with the Israeli authorities,” explains Cremisan’s Sara Faustinelli.

        Papal influence notwithstanding, in order to export its wines Cremisan still has to negotiate all the obstacles placed in the way of Palestinian food and wine producers by Israel. Water supply is unreliable because so much of it is siphoned off from deep aquifers for Israeli settlements. The Palestinian Hydrology Group says that Palestinians use only a fifth of the water used by Israelis, but pay four times as much for it. So Cremisan’s growers, like many Palestinian farmers, are building rainwater-collection systems in order to be more self-reliant. The whole business of getting Palestinian goods to market is slower than it should be because they have to be driven to an Israeli checkpoint by a Palestinian in a van that is half empty (so it can easily be searched), offloaded, then picked up on the other side by a driver with Israeli number plates. When Palestinian goods arrive at an Israeli port, they undergo further rigorous security checks. The net effect of this system is to double the cost to Palestinian exporters.

        so after israel erases palestine from the land they will then change their history too? you’re a good example of how that’s done 4tech. playing your part well. and you say you’re a muslim too? i don’t believe you.

      • tree
        tree
        December 3, 2015, 1:38 am

        Interesting stuff about Cremisan, annie, but I don’t know why you even bother trying to have a rational conversation with a4tech. He thinks there’s such a thing as the “Squaw Nation”. “Squaw” of course being an English word (based on an Algonquin morpheme for woman) that most Native Americans consider offensive. And he has this cartoon noble savage picture in his head where all Native Americans lived in perfect harmony with each other, when anyone with even a scintilla of knowledge on the subject knows there were often serious conflicts between tribes, disputes over usufructuary rights, and even cases of ethnic cleansing by some tribes, well before any interaction with European settlers. Not that any of that excuses the bad things that the US government did, but it shows how utterly ignorant the man is, and how willing he is to just make stuff up, which is what he is doing with this “sub-culture” schtick, as if he is familiar with Palestinian society. Next he’ll be telling us about the importance of the Sharmouta hamula in Palestine.

        Remember the commenter who claimed to be a Bulgarian Jew who was oh so brilliant and worked as an accountant or some such for New Mexico ? I forget his name, but I bet you that’s our a4tech the Muslim under a different alias. He’s having a little joke on us.

      • annie
        annie
        December 3, 2015, 6:51 am

        lil divert joke tree. right, don’t know why i even bother

      • December 3, 2015, 2:29 am

        Annie that one article you posted clearly talks about alcohol consumption within the Christian community in Palestine. Whilst the article itself didn’t present any false information, the use of such articles to push the narrative of widespread adoption of alcoholic drinks among the Palestinians, even going as far to say Palestinians celebrate their long history of producing and consuming alcoholic drink is pure whitewashing of reality.

        Christian Palestinians, who are the primary consumers of alcohol in the region, are less than 5% of the population. The other 95% are Muslims, if not by faith atleast by cultural practice. Consequently the majority does not share the same view towards alcohol nor do they possess the same affinity for it compared to the small minority of Palestinians that openly engage in such practices.

        What’s wrong with correctly attributing cultural practices to the actual peoples participating in them? Why do you have to lump all Palestinians together as if they are a brown exotic monolith which you can freely represent through your outsider perspective?

      • Philemon
        Philemon
        December 23, 2015, 10:25 pm

        a4tech
        “What’s wrong with correctly [it depends on your definition of “correctly” pace Afourtech] attributing cultural practices to the actual peoples participating in them? Why do you have to lump all Palestinians together as if they are a brown exotic monolith which you can freely represent through your outsider perspective?”

        Gee, Afourtech, I haven’t noticed anyone doing that (i.e., you know, the “lumping” thing with the Palestinian monolith) except maybe some Zionist brainwashed idiots who live in fear of the Palestinian whatever.

        You know, Afourtech, you seem to be remarkably ignorant of the norms of good society in Palestine. Annie, on the other hand, having been there, seems to understand them.

        Afourtech, you are such a fake.

    • heb
      heb
      December 2, 2015, 11:18 am

      There is now a second small brewery in Palestine – Shepherd’s, in Birzeit. Good stuff,too.

    • Walker
      Walker
      December 2, 2015, 5:48 pm

      Great comment, pgtl10. Zionists are always trying to eliminate Palestinian Christians from the picture, to better enforce the notion that Palestinians = Muslims = bad bad bad bad jihad against Jews.

      Not only was wine produced in Palestine before the Zionists showed up, but many leaders in the resistance to Zionism have been or are Christian Palestinians. That includes not only Edward Said and Hanan Ashrawi, but resistance leaders like George Habash and Nayef Hawatmeh who were far more militant than Arafat back in the day.

      • Les
        Les
        December 2, 2015, 8:37 pm

        It makes it easier for our media to choose to omit Arabs who are Christian, whether in Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, or Egypt whose Muslims are invariably depicted by that media as big nosed swarthy people.

  7. Boomer
    Boomer
    December 2, 2015, 6:55 am

    I imagine that many Zionist Jews do regard non-Zionist Jews as “nuts.” Of course, people outside the cult or tribe see things differently. This morning, NPR’s “national security reporter” (who disparaged Glenn Greenwald as not a real journalist) had a piece about radicals in Europe. Of course, she didn’t include Zionists among the radicals.

    Excerpt:

    “Rik Coolsaet, a professor of international relations at Ghent University in Belgium, who has been studying radicalization there — and in Europe more generally — sees much of this radicalization through the lens of sociology.

    “It is not new,” he says. “In the study of terrorism it is very often the case that you are not, as an individual, radicalizing all by yourself. Often it is a case that you radicalize due to small-group dynamics — kinship and friendship bonds.”

    http://www.npr.org/2015/12/02/458116246/in-worst-attacks-terrorists-often-have-closest-bonds

    • YoniFalic
      YoniFalic
      December 2, 2015, 8:48 am

      I wonder if the unwillingness of most Euros to see the psychotic extremism of Zionism comes from the etymological connection of words like “Jew” and “Hebrew” to groups and places described in the Bible.

      If English like Icelandic used a word completely unrelated to the word Judea (Gyðingur), would it be more obvious that Eastern Europeans like my family, North Africans, Iraqis, and Yemenis simply have no claim to Palestine, don’t belong there, and must leave so that the land can be returned to the natives, who are the rightful owners of the country?

      • Boomer
        Boomer
        December 2, 2015, 2:35 pm

        Yes, no doubt the historical (and racial) connections, the familiar names and tribes and myths, the “privileged” status accorded by virtue of the holy scriptures (even in a secular Western European society, a vestigial legacy remains) are among the factors. They are fundamentally of us Europeans and our heritage–even if different in some respects– and therefore not extremists, not radicals, not terrorists. Of course, “privilege” is relevant in another sense of the word as well, implying money, power, social connections, the ability to define the terms of discourse, to discipline departures from the approved narrative.

  8. CigarGod
    CigarGod
    December 2, 2015, 10:24 am

    Jodi likes “Nuts”.
    Bill O’really likes “Idiots”.
    Trump likes “loser, lightweight, moron, dummy, zero”.

    Bird brains of a feather.

    • Boomer
      Boomer
      December 2, 2015, 2:37 pm

      And, less pejoratively but still dismissively, Dana Milbank refers to non-Zionist Jews as “bizarre.”

      • JWalters
        JWalters
        December 2, 2015, 6:11 pm

        A full court press by the self-proclaimed rulers of the world.

      • Les
        Les
        December 2, 2015, 8:41 pm

        One wonders what Milbank calls anti-zionist Jews.

  9. Rooster
    Rooster
    December 2, 2015, 11:34 am

    I think Ms Rudoren used the word “occupation” exactly once (but I could be wrong) during the entire segment.

    But at least she used the word once, I guess.

  10. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    December 2, 2015, 12:54 pm

    Both the woman who interviewed Jodi and Jodi referred to the situation as “complicated” If one is focused on facts why so “complicated” or “challenging”

    She refers to the Palestinians as being in”deep disarray and a schism” but does not get into why. The are “fundamentals really changing?” issue that she was allegedly there to report about.

    • Les
      Les
      December 2, 2015, 8:46 pm

      I am sure the German newspaper readers of the time would have agreed that the situation of the Jews of the Warsaw Ghetto was indeed “complicated” or “challenging.”

  11. eljay
    eljay
    December 2, 2015, 1:02 pm

    Jodi Rudoren of the New York Times … dismissed our point about the Jewish National Fund, which is the major funder of the effort to recreate ancient wine. “They said that I didn’t talk about the JNF, the Jewish National Fund, that was responsible for the uprooting of hundreds of thousands of Palestinians,” she said. “Well, I didn’t. That’s background that’s not really relevant to the story …

    “My latest article is about John, who is trying to start a family. Isn’t that nice?”
    “Ummm…John is a rapist trying to impregnate his latest victim. That’s a pretty significant bit of information to omit.”
    “Hey, I talked about John. The fact that he’s a rapist is not really relevant to the story.”

    • JWalters
      JWalters
      December 2, 2015, 6:12 pm

      Excellent parallel. Except with the Israelis it’s mass murder.

  12. Kathleen
    Kathleen
    December 2, 2015, 1:04 pm

    Jodi “appealed to foodies, wine lovers” Does she write for the food section of the NYBloody Times?

    Has a group focused on journalistic accuracy dissected her articles as she says has not been done?

  13. KarlRKaiser
    KarlRKaiser
    December 2, 2015, 2:00 pm

    The NYT has many excellent essays and articles, but I will no longer read any of them given that they are used to launder drivel which advances the ethnic cleansing of Arabs by Israeli Jews.

  14. oldgeezer
    oldgeezer
    December 2, 2015, 3:46 pm

    In fairness to rudoren her writing was a pure puff piece bordering on an advertisement for the Israeli wine sector. No one expects a pure puff piece to address any significant issues.

    It does speak very loudly to her lack of ability as a journalist that her swan song was a puff piece when she was sitting in an area where millions of Palestinians are denied their basic human rights, where Palestinian children are even subjected to torture, where innocents on both sides become victims of deadly terrorism.

    God forbid that she should actually cover any serious issue in any depth or balance.

    What’s next jodi? Food critic for the local paper in waco?

    • JWalters
      JWalters
      December 2, 2015, 6:19 pm

      And the editorial choice to feature a piece portraying happy, friendly Israelis making wine (embellished with bullsh*t as several posters have described) rather than seriously analyzing the facts that are making both Israelis and Palestinians miserable, speaks to the corrupt motives of the owners and editors.

      • Kathleen
        Kathleen
        December 3, 2015, 10:30 am

        Should have been in the NYBloody Times Travel section.

  15. JWalters
    JWalters
    December 2, 2015, 6:02 pm

    Rudoren’s interview is a model of pretending to be objective, pretending to be interested in understanding the situation, pretending to connect the dots and tell the story. She was professionally abetted by the compliant interviewer, who pretended to ask one or two “tough” questions.

    Rudoren’s fog, I suspect, is based on a sincere belief that Jews are entitled to steal Palestinians’ land. But explaining that to non-Jews is “complicated”. The interviewer, not being Jewish, may simply not want to lose her job.

  16. lyn117
    lyn117
    December 5, 2015, 1:00 pm

    In the interview, Rodoren mentioned attacks by Palestinians on Israelis numerous times, but attacks by Jews on Palestinians once that I counted. Despite that Israeli attacks on Palestinians are far more common and lethal.

    The whole occupation of the West Bank is an attack by Israelis on Palestinians

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