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What Palestinians can learn from South African anti-apartheid struggle

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The current situation in Occupied Palestine has been well-documented elsewhere. The statistics show higher levels of Palestinian deaths, disabilities, home demolitions and poverty than at any other time since the dispossession of Palestinians in 1948. The international siege against the Palestinians of Gaza following the democratic election in January 2006 has led to an almost total collapse of all economic activity.

At the same time, there is an internal crisis of political leadership, with the Palestinian factions being unable to agree to the terms of a unity government. This has left Palestinian civil society divided at a time when it is imperative that Palestinians show unity against the Israeli occupation. This is why we believe that the example of South Africa has a role to play in Palestine today.

Not only can we learn about Israel by examining apartheid in South Africa, but we can also help to take the Palestinian cause forward by learning from the South African anti-apartheid struggle, the manner in which it framed its objectives and the strategies and tactics that it used. Particularly, the successful campaign by the South African liberation forces in the isolation of the South African apartheid state is an experience we can examine and then adopt from and employ whatever might be useful in the new apartheid context.

Learning from the South African Struggle

The South African struggle against apartheid, it is generally understood, was based on “four pillars”. These were:

  1. International solidarity and international isolation of the apartheid state;
  2. The internal resistance;
  3. The armed struggle; and
  4. The underground movement.

It is also generally accepted that the first two of these pillars were the most significant and effective in bringing about an end to the brutal and racist apartheid state.

There are a number of socio-economic differences between the apartheid context in Palestine and apartheid South Africa and these need to be seriously considered by Palestinian activists. Nevertheless, a Palestinian campaign for the isolation of the apartheid state of Israel needs to be given careful focus in order that it becomes an important “pillar” in the Palestinian struggle for self-determination and dignity as a people. In the South African context this campaign included a number of focus areas. These included:

  • Military sanctions against the apartheid state;
  • Political and diplomatic isolation;
  • Economic sanctions;
  • An academic boycott; and
  • A cultural and sporting boycott.

After almost complete isolation through all of the above (together with the internal resistance within South Africa), the South African apartheid regime was finally forced to make certain compromises and the world saw the unbanning of the various liberation movements and the beginning of the negotiations that led to South Africa’s first democratic election and the beginning of the attempt to realise “one person, one vote in a non-racial, non-sexist democratic South Africa”.

All of the above as focus areas are up for consideration in the struggle to isolate apartheid Israel. They need to be examined in terms of their efficacy in the South African struggle and adapted to be used in the Palestinian struggle. Each one of the above will require detailed programmes of action; will have to be resourced with information, material, propaganda and activists; and will need to have its own structures to take it forward in a coordinated and effective manner.

Gaza-based BDS group

The question is how to keep up the fight against this form of oppression? What is there to learn from the anti-apartheid struggle?

Our BDS experience is a good. We are part of  this global campaign, which is Palestinian-led, and fighting for freedom, justice and equality

Our local BDS group is made up of individuals from across Palestinian society and includes academics, university students, documentary film-makers, medical doctors and political activists from across the political spectrum. It is a branch of the Boycott National Committee (BNC), the broadest Palestinian civil society coalition that works to lead and support the BDS movement. Our group was formed to spearhead activities in the Gaza Strip. It is not directly linked to any political organisation, but is instead, rooted in civil society.

It, therefore, welcomes membership from all political factions but views itself as a broad-based Palestinian civil society movement whose raison d’etre is to isolate the state of Israel in the manner of the Anti-Apartheid Movement against Apartheid South Africa.

That is why we have been conducting an ongoing campaign to raise awareness about the importance of the boycott of Israel as a means of weakening the state of Israel. The campaign takes the view that the boycott of Israel is a struggle in which every Palestinian can take part and aims to highlight the ways in which this can be done.

As part of the BDS campaign, we aim to coordinate with, and lobby, international, Arab and Islamic solidarity movements and boycott campaigns to strengthen the movement against apartheid Israel.

Over the few years of its existence, the Gaza-based BDS group has engaged in some of the following activities:

  • Met with several Gaza and West Bank-based NGO’s and civil society organisations
  • Initiated public lectures, in which activists, researchers and politicians discuss the rationale for a boycott of Israel and how Palestinians can participate.
  • Screened documentaries in schools, universities and clubs about the international campaigns to isolate Israel in an attempt to raise an internationalist consciousness in Palestine
  • Published articles and research in journals and magazines on the topic.
  • Lobbied the universities and other organisations to support the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel.
  • Built links with Palestinian organisations in the West Bank, 48 Palestine and in the Diaspora
  • Organized Israeli Apartheid Week activities
  • Lobbied Legislative Council members to support BDS
  • Participated online in numerous activities with international solidarity groups
  • Organized concerts in support of cultural boycott

We believe that THE cause behind Israel’s “incremental genocide”—as Ilan Pappe calls it—of the Palestinians of Gaza is the fact that they are not born to Jewish mothers! But we are also certain, not unlike the South Africa of the late 1980’s, that this is the darkest hour that is just before the dawn of freedom, justice and equality.

Haidar Eid
About Haidar Eid

Haidar Eid is Associate Professor of Postcolonial and Postmodern Literature at Gaza's al-Aqsa University. He has written widely on the Arab-Israeli conflict, including articles published at Znet, Electronic Intifada, Palestine Chronicle, and Open Democracy. He has published papers on cultural Studies and literature in a number of journals, including Nebula, Journal of American Studies in Turkey, Cultural Logic, and the Journal of Comparative Literature.

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35 Responses

  1. eljay
    eljay
    January 10, 2018, 1:28 pm

    … The South African struggle against apartheid, it is generally understood, was based on “four pillars”. These were:
    1.International solidarity and international isolation of the apartheid state …

    That may be the toughest pillar for Palestinians to build given the political and financial power and influence wielded by Jewish and non-Jewish Zionists.

    … The Gaza Strip is the most densely populated place Earth. …

    I did a quick google of this claim and couldn’t find any support for it. At “best”, it’s the third most densely populated place on Earth. IMO if the claim can’t be supported, it shouldn’t be made because Zionists will use it as a distraction.

    • annie
      annie
      January 10, 2018, 6:39 pm

      at best? as far as i know neither singapore nor hong kong’s territory include a huge swath of uninhabitable land inside its border. i’m not sure how much of gaza’s territory is uninhabitable because of that 32 mile “security border” with israel, but it’s a lot. i’ve been there, it’s not a narrow strip. countless palestinians have been executed for protesting inside that barrier, and rachel corrie was murdered trying to protect a family’s home israel was demolishing to expand the depth of that barrier. once that sq km barrier is taken into consideration, it changes the equation. anyone know how deep that barrier is?

      when i was there all the homes along the border of the wide barrier were uninhabited, bombed and pockmarked with bullet holes. and those homes were not inside the barrier.

      • eljay
        eljay
        January 10, 2018, 7:58 pm

        || Annie Robbins: at best? as far as i know neither singapore nor hong kong’s territory include a huge swath of uninhabitable land inside its border. i’m not sure how much of gaza’s territory is uninhabitable because of that 32 mile “security border” with israel, but it’s a lot. … ||

        Yeah, I forgot about that. But that doesn’t show up in any google search so my point remains.

        Perhaps it would be better to say:

        The Gaza Strip is one of the most densely populated places on Earth.

        Or perhaps a small paragraph of helpful (and, IMO, damning) information would help clarify the claim:

        The Gaza Strip – which has a population of P – covers an area of approximately N square miles. Thanks to Israel’s “security borders” – an M square miles (militarized) stretch of territory *inside* Gaza’s border that is roughly W meters wide and runs the full K km. length of the Strip, Gaza’s population is confined to NminusM square miles, effectively making the Gaza Strip the most densely populated place on Earth.

        Just a thought.

  2. Citizen
    Citizen
    January 10, 2018, 5:41 pm

    I will wait and see what any Palestinian has to say about this article. I agree, the Palestinians are not presenting a united front. US/Israel did an effective job of dividing HAMAS and Abbas. There’s no effective financial counter to AIPAC matrix donor group, nor to single-minded individual Israel First donors like Haim Saban and Sheldon Adelson. Also, the struggle against apartheid South Africa gained serious support (belatedly) in the US because of white guilt due to USA’s history of slavery, and the Civil Rights Movement. It was not difficult for the Average American to end up sympathizing with the blacks of S Africa. Comparatively, the average American knows nothing about the struggle of the Palestinians, nor about just how a heavy a hand the US government has played against the Palestinian resistance movement, especially since 1967. The Palestinians also do not have a card they can play as powerful as the charge of Jew-Hatred, especially because the US main media has been complicit in not telling the US public what has been going on so detrimental to the native Palestinians since the Zionists established their state.

    • annie
      annie
      January 10, 2018, 6:42 pm

      I will wait and see what any Palestinian has to say about this article.

      wait for what? also, the author is palestinian.

    • January 11, 2018, 7:41 pm

      Citizen

      All your points are, IMO, spot on as to why the Palestinian struggle to end Israeli Apartheid is much more difficult.

      Unlike the ruling white racist elites of apartheid SA, the Zionists are everywhere and well established and entrenched in the west and in all the influential industries from mass media to politics. They provide cover and have been keeping the status quo for decades while the hardcore Zionists go about the business of exterminating Palestinians and our culture along with confiscating land. Any push back and out comes the antisemitic card to defame the source.

      Western familiarity with slavery and the struggles the Black community has faced and continues to face did serve to make boycotting aparthied SA much easier to get behind. The history and struggles of the Palestinians are still largely unknown to the average westerner, for now.

      The lack of a united Palestinian political leadership is also a substantial hindrance. There are many reasons for this not the least of which is Zionist money and violence. The Zionists have created a desperate vulnerable population where individuals are easily dealt with. Bribing, jailing or killing political leaders has played a large role in ensuring political disarray.

      But, despite it all, I remain hopeful.

      Liberal Zionists, who I believe make up the great majority of influencers in the West, are starting to turn on Zionism. The more that do the less cover that is provided – the NYT has recently published a couple of articles that suggest Zionism is being sincerely assessed by many liberal Jews. Weaning off of Zionism will take time but we know it’s possible and happening more and more.

      BDS is educating young students on the injustices exacted on the Palestinians and leaders like Linda Sarsour have popular appeal with a relatively uncontroversial (or at least familiar) message – equality for all under the law. The plight of the Palestinians is becoming a staple cause in the political left along side the plight of women, blacks, other ethnic minorities and the LGTB community. The Palestinian brand is starting to gain some recognition.

      As far as Palestinian leadership goes, I suspect it will take the informal leaders of the movement to unite the politicians – leaders like Ms Ahed Tamimi may serve to rally all to stand together no matter the consequences. At least I hope so. I say hope because when a leader emerges the Zionists are quick to counter aided by an accommodating MSM that either defames or ignores the person or message. The power of the internet is the only chance the Palestinians have to combat Zionist hasbara and have their stories heard and leaders popularized, praised and followed.

      Zionism has a shelf life but the expiry date is still unknown.

  3. mkleiman
    mkleiman
    January 11, 2018, 11:01 am

    Professor Eid says that international opposition and solidarity and internal resistance; were more important than armed struggle; and the underground movement. I’m not so certain. From late 1987 June of 1988 South Africa fought pitched tank and artillery battles at division-level strength against the Angolan revolutionaries and their Cuban reinforcements. The South Africans sustained heavy casualties and their command structure was almost entirely broken. The Angolan army and Cuban volunteers were able to occupy land bordering on Namibia and began building air strips. Eighteen months after that South Africa released Mandela. For details see Prof. Horace Campbell’s history at https://monthlyreview.org/2013/04/01/the-military-defeat-of-the-south-africans-in-angola/.

    All political efforts in the struggle are crucial and should be supported. But it is a mistake, especially given the nature of the Israeli government, to think that this problem will be solved through politics alone.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      January 15, 2018, 6:37 pm

      “But it is a mistake, especially given the nature of the Israeli government, to think that this problem will be solved through politics alone.”

      I’ve always thought it likely Zionism will go out of Palestine the way it came in, as a terrorist organization.

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      January 16, 2018, 10:42 am

      Noam Chomsky touches on that point about the war in Angola in a discussion with Ilan Pappé:
      ———————————————————-

      NC: I would not push the South African analogy too far because there are striking differences. One difference that cannot be acknowledged in the USA for obvious reasons is that it was the Cubans that destroyed the South African regime. It was they who drove South African aggressors out of Angola, Namibia, broke the mythology of the white superman. It was Black troops that were driving them out. It had an enormous effect. It is going to take a long time before this enters the US consciousness.

      The other thing is what you talked about. The homogenous white community. Which meant that there was a crucial class issue. It was possible to reach a settlement in South Africa the kind of which is impossible in Israel. The final settlement was, let’s keep the socio-economic system and have some Black faces in the limousines. You cannot do that in Israel.

      IP: Making the parallel between South Africa and Palestine has advantages and disadvantages. You already have a Palestinian bourgeoisie inside Israel. You did not have African heads of medical departments in South Africa. Take the Galilee for example. There the intertwined communities are slowly becoming a fact of life. It already has a reality that reflects the future. The nature of the state is still ethnic and segregationist, but the transition to a state that recognizes the reality that already exists on the ground does not have to be as dramatic or drastic as it was in South Africa.

      In other parts of the country, especially in the West Bank and Greater Jerusalem area, dismantling the present reality and replacing it by a more just one would be very similar to the process occurring in the transition in South Africa from apartheid to a post-apartheid state. So there is no harm is studying closely the South African case so as not to repeat the mistakes made there and also be aware of the differences that would require original thinking for the case of Israel and Palestine.

      NC: South Africa was different because the white population needed its Black counterpart. It was its workforce. Israel does not want the Palestinians. South Africa actually supported the bantustans. They wanted them to develop because they had to reproduce the workforce and to be internationally recognized. In details it’s not going to be a similar process even though there are some similarities. What I mentioned before—Israel determined that they will be a pariah state, but that it did not matter as long as the US backed them. That’s very much the South African position. That is why I have often written, since the 1970s, that the people who call themselves supporters of Israel are in fact supporters of its moral degeneration and probably ultimate destruction.

      IP: Absolutely.

      [“On Palestine” (pp. 74-76). ]

      * * * *

      NC: […]there is a crucial aspect of the end of apartheid [in South Africa] that is totally suppressed here and in Britain for reasons of ideological fanaticism. Apartheid was substantially ended by Cuba. The scholarly record on this by now is just overwhelming. The Cubans sent military forces, mostly Black soldiers, who drove the South Africans out of Angola, forced them to leave Namibia, broke the mythology of this white superman, which had a big effect on white and Black South Africa. And the South Africans know it. When Mandela was let out of jail, his first comment was to praise Cubans for their inspiration and their help, because they played a huge part in ending apartheid. You cannot say that in the USA or in England, because we have a kind of religious fanaticism that says that we are not allowed to tell the truth about these matters. But that was an overwhelming factor, and of course, it’s missing here. We should think about other models, but it is important to break through the ideological constraints in the West which prevent recognition of what in fact happened. That’s pretty important.

      [“On Palestine” (pp. 88-89) ]

  4. Naftush
    Naftush
    January 11, 2018, 1:30 pm

    So it’s the same old thing. The Palestinian leadership is divided so, first, let’s rev the engines against Israel. But that leadership isn’t divided. It accurately mirrors the Palestinian national deficiency. Apart from embracing the Palestinian brand name and reviling Israel, there’s little to find. And second, let’s weep for the Gaza Strip. It is indeed a distressing place but what, the most densely populated place on earth? Say again? Any built up area of its size is equally or more densely populated. Tel Aviv is more densely populated. The “dawn” that the author seeks will start to break when Palestinian civil society faces up to what it is, what it isn’t, and what Israel is and isn’t, irrespective of “lessons” from South Africa.

    • eljay
      eljay
      January 11, 2018, 2:43 pm

      || Naftush: … The “dawn” that the author seeks will start to break when Palestinian civil society faces up to what it is, what it isn’t, and what Israel is and isn’t, irrespective of “lessons” from South Africa. ||

      The victim can spend all day every day facing up to what is and what isn’t, but she won’t be liberated from the rapist’s basement until he faces up to what he is.

      • Naftush
        Naftush
        January 12, 2018, 12:54 am

        Ah, Israel as rapist and the Palestinians as its female victims. The wonders of intersectionality! I’ll explain myself better. Palestinian civil society and Palestinian leadership hold themselves together only by negation, i.e., fixating on Israel. Their amen chorus chooses the same direction by bringing in the South African analogy, never mind that it fits only when it’s twisted to death. Haidar Eid proposes that they cure these ailments by doubling down on them. I trace the whole thing to a deficiency in Palestinian nationhood. The rhetoric exists, not so the substance.

      • eljay
        eljay
        January 12, 2018, 8:34 am

        || Naftush: Ah, Israel as rapist and the Palestinians as its female victims. … ||

        Doesn’t matter if the victims are female or male – the relationship is the same.

        || … I’ll explain myself better. Palestinian civil society and Palestinian leadership hold themselves together only by negation, i.e., fixating on Israel. … Haidar Eid proposes that they cure these ailments by doubling down on them. ||

        Yes, you explained yourself better: The victims hold themselves together by negation, i.e., fixating on the rapist. The rapist is entitled to double down to cure the ailment, while the victims should simply accept their fate and make themselves comfortable in the basement.

  5. Keith
    Keith
    January 14, 2018, 8:18 pm

    To me, the biggest lesson of South African “victory” over apartheid is that control of the political system without control of the economic system is a hollow victory. The local white oligarchs and the western transnational corporations still run the place and the majority of people are still poor or poorer. Black figureheads no cause for celebration as neoliberalism marches on.

  6. Bont Eastlake
    Bont Eastlake
    January 14, 2018, 9:54 pm

    Okay, this is still regressive approach. South Africa was the first country to overthrow apartheid, but first doesn’t mean correct. Today, the country is still hopelessly poor, with extreme levels of social and economical inequality, high crime rate, worsening gender relations and of course, soul crushing corruption levels. All of this legitimized by purported independence and self-determination. Atleast when people suffered during the apartheid the enemy was clear and the causes was true. Now South Africans still suffer but nobody knows why for sure and whos the enemy. Its an acceptable suffering now, that’s for sure.

    The nation state was the victor along with the banking institutions that finances it. The same faceless, formless entity that represents Israel, America, Australia and pretty much every country in the world right now.

    Palestine should not emulate south Africa. Don’t fall for the same trap the they fell into. Let Israel continue their systems of apartheid, but force them to pay for the privilege. Make the price as high as the pain it causes them. Don’t give up your identity as a people for a concept of a nation state thats designed to disenfranchise you.

    • annie
      annie
      January 14, 2018, 10:43 pm

      Let Israel continue their systems of apartheid, but force them to pay for the privilege. Make the price as high as the pain it causes them.

      for starters, what do you think jerusalem is worth, in monetary value? name your price. how much would you charge for it. value your pain to give up all claim to it. since you think their home can be bought, sell yours.

      then the galilee. name your price.

      • Bont Eastlake
        Bont Eastlake
        January 15, 2018, 1:29 am

        That’s the Israelis problem to deal with. They want Jerusalem, Galilee, the West Bank…they need to stay up late at night and do the math on what it would take to buy them. If Palestinians are not selling, Israel need to figure out why.

        The average Palestinians have little interest in entangling themselves in the political games being played by the Zionists and their allies. They can’t force Israel to accept the truth, only force Israel to pay the price of taking their land. Even if it means to go to prison, get shot, or massacred wholesale. That’s the price I suppose. How much is a 30 year jail term in prison worth in monetary terms? How much is a life cut short worth? What’s the price for genocide?

    • gamal
      gamal
      January 15, 2018, 12:27 am

      “Now South Africans still suffer but nobody knows why for sure and whos the enemy”

      “They think because they black they better than the old slave master

      They still have the whips on we back and they drive a little harder………

      They said better would come instead things get harder
      Tragic situation oppression is a game they have learnt well” etc

      Samory I “Lost Africans”…..

      “So tell me who should I man fear, when I don’t see no change, who should I man fear when the proposition is the same”

      You don’t get any credit for being black in black culture, that would be pointless or in white culture for that matter, so you’ve lost me, what don’t you know?

      “Dem a poison……we know” like Cyril “Marikana” Ramaphosa, at the time who supported Winnie Mandela or the PAC or all those who didn’t buy that Invictus crap.

      If you don’t know any black people bont i could advise you as to what we know.

      • Bont Eastlake
        Bont Eastlake
        January 15, 2018, 1:16 am

        Gamal,

        Good call on the similarities of arguments, perhaps fallacious ones, decrying the pointlessness of rebelling against injustice. I couldn’t help it considering the path I see countries are moving toward these days, where life is becoming increasingly degrading and states are directly or indirectly demanding the common citizen to prove their worth of existing before offering firm representation and support.

        Nation states were imposed on South Africa and other land as a tool of subjugation and exerting the powers of the rulers over everything and everyone on it. Apartheid South Africa did it at the expense of black South Africans. Israel is doing the same to Israelis, at the expense of Palestinians, because no populace would willingly subject themselves to be ruled over and be subjugated without considerable privileges in return.

        By compromising into becoming part of the state, Palestinian stand to lose all of their good will and political righteousness and will find themselves in worse situation than they are in now. Nation state cannot exist without oppression, and Palestinians do not need oppressive to thrive.

    • echinococcus
      echinococcus
      January 15, 2018, 12:29 am

      Eastlake,

      Your first paragraph is exactly right.
      For the third paragraph, see Annie. Let’s see how much you can be bought for.

      As for the “trap the South Africans fell into”, that’s called a compromise. The Whites weren’t as stubbornly and uniformly suicidal as the Zionists, their ideological mix was much more benign, and the owners of the place had to limit the sacrifice.

      • Bont Eastlake
        Bont Eastlake
        January 15, 2018, 1:36 am

        When push comes to shove, every country will reveal its own version of suicidally stubborn Zionists.

        Palestinians cannot risk losing themselves in order to correct the injustice they had no part in creating.

    • Maghlawatan
      Maghlawatan
      January 15, 2018, 10:58 am

      SA is unfinished business because the white population held on to economic power with the help of a few ANC heads.
      Palestinians need to think beyond that.
      They also need to avoid what happened to the Egyptian revolution.

      It is going to need outside force, whether military or economic.
      Mearsheimer :

      ” No matter how well-written or delivered, a speech cannot divert who le societies from a well-established course of action. Policies in motion tend to remain in motion; to change the trajectory of a deeply-entrenched set of initiatives requires the application of political forces of equal momentum.”

  7. echinococcus
    echinococcus
    January 15, 2018, 12:38 am

    Excellent. One thing I have trouble swallowing, though:
    ” It is also generally accepted that the first two of these pillars were the most significant and effective…”

    Who is that “it is”? What are the political leanings, biases, class identity of “it is”? How is “it” general? Let’s have it.

    Some familiarity with the SA and wider decolonization movement history (especially for us old farts who were directly involved in this or that aspect) and half a minute of thinking will show that there could be no item #2 on that list without item #1, no item # 3 without item #2, and no item #4 without item #3. Noway.

  8. Emet
    Emet
    January 15, 2018, 12:59 pm

    When the Blacks were offered a split in the country, whereby they would receive a majority of the land, they turned down the offer. Hang on, this never happened in South Africa. It happened in Palestine.
    When the Blacks refused to split and share the country, they launched an all-out war against the Whites and had all their brothers from neighboring countries launch an all-out war against the Whites. Hang on, this also did not happen in South Africa. Silly me, it happened in Palestine.
    Before the end of apartheid, the Whites and the Blacks met not too long ago and the Whites made another offer to the Blacks. This was not as good as the first offer but a highly generous offer never the less. Hang on, this never happened in South Africa. It did happen at Camp David of course.

    The bottom line is the two conflicts have nothing in common. The Palestinians have nothing to learn from the Blacks. If this is not enough, the Palestinians are not deserving of their support. The Palestinians are responsible for their own shit they are in. Stop blaming others. The entire Middle East is full of war, conflict and bloodshed. ITS NOT ISRAEL’S FAULT!!!!!!!!!

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        January 15, 2018, 5:44 pm

        Oh, sorry, that link was supposed to be in the thread on vintage whines. It’s from 2007.

    • Talkback
      Talkback
      January 16, 2018, 8:49 am

      Sheqer: “When the Blacks were offered a split in the country, whereby they would receive a majority of the land, they turned down the offer. Hang on, this never happened in South Africa. It happened in Palestine.”

      Exactly. How can you “offer” someone to split their country? Who made this “offer”? What right did he have to make this “offer”? What was the result of a referendum regarding this “offer”?

      Sheqer: “When the Blacks refused to split and share the country, they launched an all-out war against the Whites and had all their brothers from neighboring countries launch an all-out war against the Whites. Hang on, this also did not happen in South Africa. Silly me, it happened in Palestine”

      You are lying as usual. It was the Jewish Agency and its terrorist that started a war in the late 1930s against the mandatory and the Nonjewish population. It was them who started in April 1948 to conquer land beyond the borders that were recommended in the partition plan. It was them who started an all-out war while the Arab states excepted a US brokered truce in April 1948. The Arab armies only entered Palestine after the Jewish Agency declared statehood in clear violation of Security Council resolution 46 and even against the partition plan that was put on ice if not abandoned and when they saw that Palestinians were massacred and expelled large scale.

      Sheqer: “Before the end of apartheid, the Whites and the Blacks met not too long ago and the Whites made another offer to the Blacks. This was not as good as the first offer but a highly generous offer never the less. Hang on, this never happened in South Africa. It did happen at Camp David of course.”

      Now you are not only lying about the “generous offer” in Camp David, which was nothing else than a controlled Bantustan in less than 80% of Palestine, but also making a wrong fake comparision, because the Zionist Apartheid Junta never ever offered to the Palestinians to end its Apartheid.

      Sheqer: “The bottom line is the two conflicts have nothing in common.”

      Of ourse not. The Apartheid settler entity in Palestine wants to get rid of its indegenious population.

      Sheqer: “The Palestinians have nothing to learn from the Blacks. If this is not enough, the Palestinians are not deserving of their support. The Palestinians are responsible for their own shit they are in. Stop blaming others. The entire Middle East is full of war, conflict and bloodshed. ITS NOT ISRAEL’S FAULT!!!!!!!!!”

      Sure Sheqer, the Jews will never forgive the Palestinians for Zionist settler colonialism, the destruction and conquest of Palestine, seven decades of martial law imposed upon Nonjews and putting the rest of Palestine under siege and blockade.

      • Emet
        Emet
        January 16, 2018, 10:02 am

        It’s quite simple Talkback. Jews are indigenous to this land. If you don’t accept this then we will never be able to agree on anything. You will need to decide one day that you are open and willing to learn a slightly different history of the events to the one that is causing your brain to fuse. The Arabs are not going to support a Jewish state anywhere. And please spare us your Zionist supremacist crap.

      • eljay
        eljay
        January 16, 2018, 10:11 am

        || Emet: … Jews are indigenous to this land. … ||

        Some Jewish people are indigenous to geographic Palestine. Some are not.
        Some non-Jewish people are indigenous to geographic Palestine. Some are not.

        || … If you don’t accept this … ||

        …you will never cease to be a hateful and immoral Jewish supremacist (Zionist).

      • echinococcus
        echinococcus
        January 16, 2018, 10:38 am

        Eerie, the number of things the Emet character gets right.

        … we will never be able to agree on anything

        Zionists will never be able to agree on anything that counts with decent people who oppose invasion, theft and genocide. Of course.

        The Arabs are not going to support a Jewish state anywhere

        Some Arabs, like dictators, corrupt politicians, puppets etc. do. The large majority don’t because no single decent human being, no matter hisher mother tongue, Arabic or Martian, can ever agree to an internationally dispersed religious community (mainly not the religious community but its racial heirs, in the Zionists’ kinky racial definition of “Jewish”) setting up an exclusive state on other people’s land. The Palestinian people, robbed, tortured, and subject to a genocide by the Zionists, will not either. So, by and large that is correct, too.

        And please spare us your Zionist supremacist crap

        Now, now. You and your friends drown us in Zionist supremacist crap, and all of a sudden you don’t want any of it? Are you a supporter of Palestinian resistance impersonating a Zionist, who gave the game away by mistake? In that case, let me assure you that there is no need for that, Zionists hand themselves with their own rope without prompting.

      • Keith
        Keith
        January 16, 2018, 11:05 am

        EMET- ” The Arabs are not going to support a Jewish state anywhere.”

        Why should anyone support “Blood and Soil” nationalism? Why do Zionists insist upon emulating the nationalism of Nazi Germany? Is there something intrinsic to Zionism which causes this? What next, genetic studies to prove the purity of Jewish blood/DNA?

      • Talkback
        Talkback
        January 16, 2018, 12:49 pm

        Emet: “It’s quite simple Talkback.”

        I smell simplistic Hasbara coming.

        Emet: “Jews are indigenous to this land.”

        Not those who came as settlers. You even have to pervert the term “indigenous”. Those who are indigenous were those who automatically acquired Palestinian citizenship in 1925, because they were former Ottoman subjects who were habitually resident in what became mandated Palestine.

        Emet: “If you don’t accept this then we will never be able to agree on anything. You will need to decide one day that you are open and willing to learn a slightly different history of the events to the one that is causing your brain to fuse.”

        Emet, I’m intersted in emet, not in your ludicrous propaganda and perversion of history and words.

        Emet: “The Arabs are not going to support a Jewish state anywhere.”

        ROFL. They have supported the Jewish Apartheid Junta so much without any equivalent response that some of them even propose to suspend the recognition of the junta until it recognizes the State of Palestine.
        http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/palestinian-israel-suspend-recognition-plo-trump-jerusalem-a8161006.html

        Emet: “And please spare us your Zionist supremacist crap.”

        LOL. Me? The Zionist supremacist crap is not coming from me, but from you. One Example:
        Claiming that Jewish settlers are (more) indigenous to Palestine while Palestianians, including the refugees aren’t. But we all know that you won’t spare us more of your Zionist supremacist crap, don’t we?

        Just re-read your whole pathetic comment. Your pathetic claims from your former comment just imploded. You could only resort to more lies.

  9. Emet
    Emet
    January 16, 2018, 3:12 am

    Mooser, are you not amazed at how the hate for Jews keeps energizing you and you’re friends, despite all the major negatives things the Arabs have done? And when I say Arabs don’t forget to include the Palestinians in the bunch.

    • Talkback
      Talkback
      January 16, 2018, 9:04 am

      We are not amazed about you obsession to project your own hate unto others. We know that it comes with your racism.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      January 16, 2018, 1:25 pm

      “Mooser, are you not amazed at how the hate for Jews keeps energizing you…”

      “Emet”, what a horrible thing to say!

      Why on earth would I have any “hate for Jews”?

      I was born into a Jewish family, nursed at a Jewish breast (and this was when bottle feeding was in style, too. Mom told me that a lot.) brissed, instructed and Bar Mitzvah. (The presiding Rabbi was a relative!)

      I grew up singing songs like “Be True to Your Schul” and “Frum, Frum, Frum (’til Jehovah takes the Talmud away)”.

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