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‘New Yorker’ hides the Israel agenda

Israel/Palestine
on 55 Comments

Two fresh examples of the media hiding the Israel agenda in our politics.

The New Yorker ran a very long piece on Obama’s difficulties in cultivating billionaires, titled “Schmooze or Lose,” and didn’t once mention Obama’s troubles on the Israel issue, though many of the names mentioned in the piece have a dog in that fight (and even the NYT has reported that this is a problem).

Sheldon Adelson is the bete noire of the piece; and why is he spending millions and millions to elect Romney?

“’He’s got billions he could get back on the overseas-investment tax and the estate tax,’ [says one observer] both of which Romney has pledged to abolish. Moreover, Adelson’s company, Las Vegas Sands Corporation, is currently the focus of two Justice Department investigations.”

But how much does Adelson, 79, care about those investigations? Here I side with the ADL, which said lately that similar claims portray Jews as caring about money “more than their love of Israel.” Sheldon Adelson loves Israel. He acted to kill the peace process, stated that a two state solution is the death of Israel, founded a group called One Jerusalem to prevent anyone but Israel from claiming the city, and lately held a fundraiser in Jerusalem of rightwing Zionists. All unmentioned by the New Yorker.
George Soros appears as Adelson’s counterpart; but there is no mention of Soros’s backing of J Street, which supports the two-state solution as an urgent proposition, or the New Israel Fund, which seeks to redeem Israel from racism.
Even more prominent than Soros in the article is Arnold Hiatt, a “liberal” Obama supporter. Hiatt is also a Peace Now, two-state guy. He wrote this a few years ago:
 

Without two states, Jews are a minority between the Mediterranean Sea and the Jordan River. No number of fences or barriers will cancel that demographic fact. To remain a Jewish state, will Israel wall itself into a
ghetto, one large gated community? Will Israel then sacrifice its democratic character to retain permanent control over the Palestinians?

Two other New Yorker namechecks: Penny Pritzker,whose family has always been a big supporter of Israel, and David Geffen, associated with Oslo. I guess it’s verboten.

Meantime, in the same vein, the NYT op-ed page has run a piece making light of Kansas congressman Kevin Yoder’s Israel-lobby-sponsored nude swim in the Galilee last year. Writes a friend: “Feeble whimsy all for this sentence: ‘Jesus and his disciples also bathed in the lake in the nude.’ The author is “an environmental lawyer who has also worked as a tour guide in Israel” (=Israeli tour guide?). Congressman Yoder as blood-brother of Jesus embracing the life of the senses. As if if Jesus was a Roman running for re-election as tribune, and took money from the rabbis to advance his fortunes back home.”

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About Philip Weiss

Philip Weiss is Founder and Co-Editor of Mondoweiss.net.

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55 Responses

  1. Chu
    Chu
    August 28, 2012, 11:07 am

    Although the newspapers may cover for Israel until the end, the informed public understands what is happening. This is the top reader pick from NYTimes Rachel Corrie article:

    -“I wonder how many other foreign governments could murder a young American girl in cold blood and get away with it without a peep from the U.S. government. The open cynicism of the judge’s ruling, along with the recent murder of a random Palestinian by a mob of hate-crazed Israeli teenagers, tells us all we need to know about the current state of their society. Israel has been slowly poisoned by its original sin: violently displacing an indigenous Palestinian population in and then telling itself a thousand lies to justify this fact. More than a half-century of brutality and moral evasion have produced a breakdown in even the most basic standards of human decency that I as an American Jew find unbearable to witness.”

    other comments.
    -This is why we should stop sending so much money to this lawless country!

    -Even the tank in Tiananmen Square stopped.

    • seanmcbride
      seanmcbride
      August 28, 2012, 11:47 am

      Once again, I find myself wondering: how are the owners, managers and editors of publications like the New York Times, New Yorker and Washington Post handling the radical disconnect on Mideast politics between their blatantly biased editorial polices and the views of their best informed and most articulate readers? The situation is bizarre and not sustainable. It is ripe for collapse.

      • MLE
        MLE
        August 28, 2012, 12:35 pm

        Because I don’t think these readers are the ones who subscribe to the new York times for 30 or 40 years straight. Maybe they buy off the stand or read online, maybe even do the weekender subscription, but regular subscribers are older, more affluent, and PEP at the very least.

        My mom complains that the NYT is biased against Israel the way they report NOW. They still like the other sections though, so they won’t cancel their subscriptions yet- but some more pro Israel Jews might cancel if the see the NYT moving too far away from their own views. And subscriptions are the meat of the income of income for the Times and losing it could have drastic consequences.

        Anyway, my mom complains about the evening news never shows real news anymore. we don’t watch CNN or MSNBC either (According to her, CNN is pro Palestinian too). I asked her why was she watching the local stations, the quality of news on BBC (which we get on cable) and Al Jazeera (iPad streaming) was much better than Brian Williams showing you tube videos. She didn’t respond to al jazeera but she said she doesn’t like BBC because she doesn’t like media british accents or their views on some issues.

        Again, when you ask why the New York Times or New Yorker muddle the facts about Israel- its because they want my parents and their friends to keep subscribing.

      • Ranjit Suresh
        Ranjit Suresh
        August 28, 2012, 4:35 pm

        Maybe, but then why are the news networks guilty of the same muddle? In the case of CNN and MSNBC it can’t be subscribers. Is it then advertisers? Pressure groups? Or might it simply be the owners?

        Because the same dynamic exists across the board in the media and political establishment. It can’t all be because of people like your mom, can it?

      • Krauss
        Krauss
        August 28, 2012, 6:36 pm

        MLE, I think it’s more complicated than that.

        The real reason is sociology; the NYT is still a very Jewish paper. It’s editors move in élite Jewish circles in significant numbers and many have friends, family to drawn from there. They are already getting an earful of their ‘biased’ coverage. If they actually reported on Israel for what it is, you’d have a total shitstorm. ADL and the entire mafia would be knocking down their door.

        Many would have hell in their personal lives(synagogues, frozen out of social circles if not outright getting the cherem treatment.).

        Speaking of the recent Corrie trial. There was a very successful play set up in London based on her death and her fight against Apartheid which got rave reviews from well respected newspapers in England.

        The creators then tried to move it to New York but weren’t even allowed to show the play a single time because the Jewish establishment complained when asked by the producers and essentially killed it. Note that the producers went to the Jewish establishment first and asked them for their permission to show it on Broadway.

        I don’t know how many Jews are on Broadway but if we are to use the Hollywood example as a reference, and the fact that New York is the most Jewish town outside of Israel in the entire world, I’d be willing to bet quite a bit of it is Jewish. So I think it’s that tribal loyalty at play.

        For the NYT, it’s part tribal loyalty and part simple fear of social and communal exclusion.

        The NYT is still a print paper but it has a huge online audience. It can easily start to monetize that audience once it wishes to do so, like the Financial Times did because it’s seen as such an élite newspaper that everyone wants to read(simply because it’s so good on average).

        Second, we all know what happened to the pro-Palestinian ads on the subway. CBS outdoors owned them and the mangement is filled with commited Zionist Jews. It’s not like they are the majority or ‘control’ it.

        It’s just that the rest of the top management are pretty passive on the I/P issue and the only people at the top who tend to care are Jews, and that tips the scales. Do you think advertisers would flock to the NYT if they started to treat Israel like white rule-South Africa?

        Still, New Yorker’s shilling for Israel is far worse than the NYT’s is.
        Many here remember that ugly pro-IDF piece that painted Palestinians as thieves and terrorists by that IDF girl.

        Remnick may cry his crocodile tears all day long about the Occupation but in his deeds he is shilling for Israel and working overtime to cover everything up.

      • traintosiberia
        traintosiberia
        August 28, 2012, 11:10 pm

        I wonder if your reasonings are any more valid given the number of Jeiwsh people and the number of daily circulations. The reasons could be hiding somewher else. If the subscrpitions mattered then other papers in other states would be covering these issues more impartially hwere the Jewish population number mcuh less even . Its not that these papers dont have access to interesting news around the world. The local papers never fail to cover if there were some stoning to death or cutting off the hands of some poor thieves in some remote corners of Mali or Pakistan or if some intoxicated alcoholics ranting and ravings against Israel in some distant lands .

      • MLE
        MLE
        August 29, 2012, 12:38 am

        Well cable television relies on ratings- CNN is having huge problems because no one wants to watch them (meaning less money for advertisers) and MSNBC makes a lot of its advertising money on those weekend prison documentaries. Also, TV audiences are even more fickle than newspaper subscribers, you have a higher chance of losing them to another channel that they might click if they’re bored, so CNN and MSNBC have to ENTERTAIN us rather than inform, which is why they’re so big on having viewers submit things on iReport- it makes the news more interactive. PBS and NPR are a little better, but my parents donate heavily during their campaigns so while my parents aren’t Sheldon Adelson rich, their demographic is very highly sought after for money and my PEP parents already think these outlets are too hard on Israel.

        They also heavily donate to the ADL, Hadassah, The Jewish Red Star of David, JNF, and only this fall switched from donating to AIPAC to JStreet (it’s probably because they hate Newt Gingrich so they wanted to show their displeasure with Sheldon by donating to the other Israeli lobbying group) I know what they donate too, because I pick up the mail so I see who sends them contribution letters…

      • MLE
        MLE
        August 29, 2012, 12:55 am

        My parents are in the lower echelons of that circle- were not high rollers but we donate, so yes, I know what you’re talking about it being a very Jewish paper. Also, while I read the Times off my iPad, I use my parents subscription to login, so I’m really freeloading.

        Funny you mention CBS news, because when I’m unemployed I watch Judge Judy and the CBS news is on afterwards and it’s so gag worthy pro Israel. They had a big story about airfare to TelAviv being mispriced on a website and whether the airline would honor the tickets. They went on and on about the swastikas last winter, but when it came out that it was a Jewish person doing it, they never updated it. I figured there was a connection somewhere.

        The New Yorker isn’t even really a news magazine, it’s a high brow culture and arts magazine founded by the intelligencia set in New York in the 1920s. I don’t remember the guys name, but in Harpo Marx’s autobiography talks a lot about him.

        Slightly off topic, my dad has a year and a halfs of editions of the New Yorker sitting on the table in the den. he says he wants to read them all when he has some free time, but he doesn’t want to cancel and miss an issue, so the stack just gets bigger. My mom and I browse it, but if it we cancelled it, I don’t think anyone would miss it. It’s another example of money my dad wastes by subscribing because he would like to read it one day, but if they started being too critical of Israel, my mom would cancel on principle.

        Also, the worst part is my parents are same about the issue, Ive done freelance work for her friends and theyre even more rediculous.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        August 29, 2012, 1:51 am

        I was under the impression that advertisement revenue dwarfs subscription revenue. Not that the NYTs wants to lose any subscribers, as you say. Of course, if the advertisement purchasers have views similiar to the ones you describe for subscribers…

      • MLE
        MLE
        August 29, 2012, 7:31 am

        I’m now living in Hawaii and the Honolulu Star, which is the biggest newspaper doesn’t discuss very much mainland related or even less international stuff. I would say, the smaller newspapers really dont care all that much and they just want to find shocking stories for their readers.

      • MLE
        MLE
        August 29, 2012, 7:35 am

        The advertisers probably do share those feelings with subscribers and if they don’t they’re veeeeerrrry reluctant to state it outright- who wants Dershowitz on their tail?

      • dbroncos
        dbroncos
        August 28, 2012, 8:28 pm

        In one way or another money is the last firewall that Israel and its supporters are hiding behond.

  2. Stephen Shenfield
    Stephen Shenfield
    August 28, 2012, 11:36 am

    What is the meaning of using the German “verboten” for “forbidden”? For most Americans or Brits it is one of the few German words they have picked up from war movies and is clearly associated with Nazism. Leaving aside for once the pros and cons of routinely associating Israel and Zionism with Nazism, this usage also firmly associates Nazism with the German language, Germany and Germans. I have recently come to realize that contemporary Germans, who except for an elderly minority were born after 1945 into societies far removed from Nazism, find this association grossly unfair and offensive, and I think they have every right to do so. Can we stop doing it?

    • annie
      annie
      August 28, 2012, 12:42 pm

      stephen, fyi i don’t associate the word with nazis although i may be in the minority for my generation. i think the word has been picked up because it has a harder sound/implication than forbidden which is just softer. that’s not unusual for german language (harder sounding) but if the meaning of a word is hard then using a harder rendition is natural and warranted. another german word i use is uber. it’s just a great word.

      i think you have to move on and not require others to conform to your own hangups. verboten is a word that’s not going away, and when applicable should be used, just like bon voyage. there’s nothing comparable in english.

      • lysias
        lysias
        August 28, 2012, 2:43 pm

        Memorize some German poetry (Goethe, Heine, or Rilke, for example,) and German won’t sound so harsh to you any longer.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        August 29, 2012, 1:56 am

        “Memorize some German poetry (Goethe, Heine, or Rilke, for example,) and German won’t sound so harsh to you any longer.”

        Bach’s Cantatas and hymns did it for me. Can’t get enough of ’em.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel
        August 29, 2012, 4:04 am

        Bach’s Cantatas and hymns did it for me. Can’t get enough of ‘em.

        Nothing softer.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J66PUOysSOk

        Bereite dich, Zion, mit zärtlichen Trieben,
        Den Schönsten, den Liebsten bald bei dir zu sehn!
        Deine Wangen
        Müssen heut viel schöner prangen,
        Eile, den Bräutigam sehnlichst zu lieben!

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 28, 2012, 5:14 pm

        @ Annie:

        the word has been picked up because it has a harder sound/implication than forbidden which is just softer.
        Thanks for the explanation. I already wondered why the word “verboten” keeps appearing in MW articles.

        i think you have to move on and not require others to conform to your own hangups.
        Now, I am disappointed by you for the first time. Why are you so hard on Stephen? He merely gave his opinion and is clearly well-intentioned. So, please save such remarks for the Zionistan supporters.

        i don’t associate the word with nazis
        I don’t either … unless, of course, it’s used in English. So, Stephen is not the only one who has this “hang-up”.

        i think you have to move on […] verboten is a word that’s not going away
        Your reasoning reminds me of this:

      • libra
        libra
        August 28, 2012, 8:31 pm

        So Stephen Shenfield wants to forbid verboten by English speakers and German Lefty agrees. Well in that case we must plaster all our walls with signs, perhaps a big red circle around “Verboten” with a thick diagonal red line slashing through it.

        And lurking everywhere undercover agents of the dreaded Nobopo – No Verboten Police – with their ubiquitous network of informers to enforce compliance with ruthless efficiency.

        Of course, permits would need to be issued to those such as German teachers with a legitimate need to utter the forbidden verboten. They would be the lucky few who need not fear the words “Papers please!”.

        Yes, this should finally put the old Nazi stereotype to bed.

        Or perhaps Professor Ellis is right after all and it would just be simpler if German is verboten in the English-speaking world, starting with those Volkswagen “Das Auto” adverts. Because if you want a German word that really is associated with the Nazis then you can’t do much better (or worse if you will) than Volkswagen.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 29, 2012, 1:01 pm

        Libra, I appreciate your humour, but you are totally distorting what Stephen and I wrote.

        So Stephen Shenfield wants to forbid verboten by English speakers and German Lefty agrees.
        Neither of us wants to forbid “verboten”. Stephen merely asked the MW writers to refrain from using the word, on a voluntary basis.
        Personally, I don’t mind the use of “verboten” in MW articles. That’s mainly because I know that the MW writers aren’t hostile to Germans. Obviously, Mr Ellis is the exception that proves the rule. I get the impression that his involvement with MW serves to educate him, and not his readers. Isn’t it supposed to be vice versa?

        Of course, permits would need to be issued to those such as German teachers with a legitimate need to utter the forbidden verboten.
        I wrote that I associate the word “verboten” with Nazism only when it’s used in English. German teachers use the word while speaking German. So, I have no problem with that.

        Because if you want a German word that really is associated with the Nazis then you can’t do much better (or worse if you will) than Volkswagen.”
        Really? No German would ever associate “Volkswagen” with Nazism, under any circumstances.

        I begin to see the outline of Phil’s cunning plan. If he keep’s dropping more and more German words into Mondoweiss then perhaps the professor will stop sending him a new post everyday.
        If that is Phil’s plan, then I am with him. Let’s hope it will work.

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        August 29, 2012, 2:10 pm

        @ libra
        The nearest thing to VW, the people’s car,” produced in America, is Ford, who has some baggage too. BTY, hands off Porsche too? He’s the guy that made Hitler’s little working stiff car come true. The Porsche family, like the Hitler family, are of Austrian origin. Ford was Irish-Belgian by descent.

        Angst (n.)
        Blitzkrieg (n.)
        Hinterland (n.)
        Kindergarden (n.)
        Shlep (v.)
        Verboten (adj.)
        Wunderkind
        Angst (n.)
        There is only one word in German for fear and anxiety: Angst. The use of «angst» in the English language, however, seems to be restricted to its psychological meaning. This lets me assume, that «angst» first came to English with Freud around 1910.
        Blitzkrieg (n.)
        And as I watched my personal digital hell unfold, it struck me that our privacy — mine and yours — has already disappeared, not in one Big Brotherly blitzkrieg but in Little Brotherly moments, bit by bit. [Time, August 25, 1997, p38]
        1940/41 German Air Forces attacked London in a severe air fight. The German military called this a blitz-krieg (a thunder-war). The psychologic impact obviously was very heavy — even leaving a German word in Britain.
        Hinterland (n.)

      • Woody Tanaka
        Woody Tanaka
        August 29, 2012, 2:44 pm

        “I wrote that I associate the word “verboten” with Nazism only when it’s used in English. German teachers use the word while speaking German. So, I have no problem with that.”

        I think that “verboten” is generally used in English without Nazi association.

        “Really? No German would ever associate “Volkswagen” with Nazism, under any circumstances.”

        Really? That surprises me, given the fact that it directly grew from the KdF-Wagen, started by the Nazi trade union, and that Hitler had personal involvement in the project. However, given it’s success, especially it’s post war success in getting Germany back on her feet, I can see how that would outshine the company’s origins.

      • ChasMarks
        ChasMarks
        August 29, 2012, 3:07 pm

        is fahrvergnugen a real word? I love it. it rolls off the tongue, like supercalifragilisticexpialicodious.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 29, 2012, 5:39 pm

        @ Woody:

        That surprises me, given the fact that it directly grew from the KdF-Wagen, started by the Nazi trade union, and that Hitler had personal involvement in the project.

        I didn’t know that. And I don’t think that the average German bothers about how an established enterprise came into being. We look ahead, not back. The thing is that if Germans obsessed about Nazi Germany the same way some foreigners do (e.g. Mr Ellis), then we wouldn’t have time for anything else. In Germany, virtually everything has some sort of connection to Nazi Germany: the language, the buildings, older companies, the streets, the entire land, old people, young people who descend from old people. So, it’s nothing special.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 29, 2012, 5:42 pm

        is fahrvergnugen a real word?
        Yes, of course. See my favourite dictionary:
        http://www.dict.cc/?s=Fahrvergn%C3%BCgen

      • annie
        annie
        August 29, 2012, 5:57 pm

        i think some people have misinterpreted my meaning when i stated that’s not unusual for german language (harder sounding) . i meant it is not unusual for german to have words that sound harder than their english counterparts. i didn’t mean the whole language was hard sounding. some of the words in german i really like better and they have nothing to do with hardness ..like for instance schmetterling. i had a german boyfriend for awhile and i definitely liked it when he spoke to me in german.

        citizen, i like the word angst. i thought it was an english word.

        Why are you so hard on Stephen?

        because didn’t ‘merely give his opinion’ he said Can we stop doing it? as if he presumes he’s right. he can’t speak for me. plus, i would like him to link to some german source supporting his contention most germans would find american usage of the word verboten as being grossly unfair and offensive. this is all completely new news to me.

        but i don’t like the word hate, i would love it if people stopped using it around here.

      • Woody Tanaka
        Woody Tanaka
        August 29, 2012, 6:36 pm

        “i meant it is not unusual for german to have words that sound harder than their english counterparts”

        Blame the French!

      • libra
        libra
        August 29, 2012, 7:20 pm

        GL: The thing is that if Germans obsessed about Nazi Germany the same way some foreigners do (e.g. Mr Ellis), then we wouldn’t have time for anything else.

        Most English-speaking people probably have little direct contact with German people or products with the exception of German cars. Indeed it may not be too great an exaggeration to say that modern Germany projects its image to the world through its cars. And to the extent that German cars are highly desired that is no bad thing.

        But of course it creates a distorted view of Germany and Germans. The old stereotypes of quality, reliability, power, and efficiency are reinforced. And it also means that foreigners are likely to know more about the history of Volkswagen rather than how to pronounce it correctly – some may say “Volksvagen” but few “Folksvagen” (just as I doubt that Phil says “ferboten”).

        That said, I think Professor Ellis is the only person who looks at a Passat and sees a Panzer.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 30, 2012, 2:41 pm

        @ Annie:

        some of the words in german i really like better and they have nothing to do with hardness ..like for instance Schmetterling.
        Well, Tim Allen disagrees with you.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA2wsc-P7-g

        because didn’t ‘merely give his opinion’ he said Can we stop doing it? as if he presumes he’s right. he can’t speak for me.
        Okay, but don’t all people believe that the own opinion is the right opinion? I mean, otherwise they would certainly change their opinion.

        i would like him to link to some german source supporting his contention most germans would find american usage of the word verboten as being grossly unfair and offensive.
        Stephen wasn’t specifically referring to the use of the word “verboten”. He said that the association of Nazism with the German language, Germany and Germans is considered grossly unfair and offensive by Germans. And this is certainly true. Using German words from WWII films is just one way of reducing Germany to Nazism. Here are some other examples:
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwwJw849HWc
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQLRojna9aw

        Also, I remember an AfterEllen review of “Mädchen in Uniform”. Because the film is German, the author thought that it’s funny to include the word “Blitzkrieg” in the article.
        http://www.afterellen.com/movies/2010/09/madchen-in-uniform-review
        “Faster than you can say ‘blitzkrieg!’ the sparks start flying, and those cozy emotions start taking a turn for the intimate.”

        Some German readers complained in the comment section:
        “Btw, Romy Schneider turned out to be one of the great diva’s of German and French film. […] Actually, I would have appreciated a note about that rather, than a lame pun on the “blitzkrieg”. […] And believe it or not, but we Germans are more than just a very regrettable chapter in our history.I felt that to be very offenisve, and I am rarely offended by a reference to a time period that still fills me with such shame.”
        “While I’m grateful that you introduce this great movie and its superb actresses to an international audience […], I have to admit that me too, I was annoyed by your use of the word ‘Blitzkrieg’. Since this movie was shot in 1958 and is set in 1910, I think that a reference to WW2 was out of place. I know that it was meant to be funny, but to me and probably other German readers, it just wasn’t.”

        Some US readers replied:
        “Interesting. …The word apparently is much more loaded to Germans than to Americans or others. To me, I just see it as a dramatic word used to suggest sudden and forceful onslaught of action. I occasionally use it myself. It just sounds neat! I assume that is what the author here was similarly thinking. In this context, the word has no attachment to any war atrocities.”
        “i guess you are right, that some words are ‘loaded’ differently in america or germany/europe. but since this article is about a german movie i think too that the use of a word so connected to WW2 is just unnecessary.”

        I was upset about the use of the word “Blitzkrieg”, too. In fact, I was so upset that I still remember the article two years later.

        Furthermore, there was an article on Queerty about the mayor of Berlin.
        The headline includes the words “Über alles” and the last sentence of the article is: “A charismatic German leader we can get behind—who’d have ever guessed?”
        http://www.queerty.com/gay-berlin-mayor-handily-wins-re-election-is-chancellorship-next-20110919/

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 30, 2012, 3:22 pm

        @ libra:

        And it also means that foreigners are likely to know more about the history of Volkswagen rather than how to pronounce it correctly – some may say “Volksvagen” but few “Folksvagen” (just as I doubt that Phil says “ferboten”).
        This reminds me of something:
        When my British ex-boyfriend and I first got together, he mentioned that he likes to eat something called “breadvorst”. As I had never heard this word before, I asked him what it is. He was very surprised and couldn’t believe that I don’t know the “famous German breadvorst”. I started feeling majorly stupid. Then he explained to me that it’s a sausage. Finally, the penny dropped and I replied: “Oh, you mean ‘Bratwurst’!”
        There was a further misunderstand. My ex-boyfriend told me about a guy called “Rudi Waller”. Again, he was surprised to find out that I don’t know who this person is. After some explanations, I realised that he means Rudi Völler.

      • lysias
        lysias
        September 7, 2012, 2:54 pm

        My first thought on seeing the word “verboten” is the “RAUCHEN VERBOTEN” signs I used to keep seeing the two years I was stationed with the U.S. Air Force in Berlin.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 28, 2012, 5:43 pm

        @ Annie:

        that’s not unusual for german language (harder sounding)

        Here are two of my favourite German songs.
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5i6FiyRjx1g
        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y7dDMMTgg10

        What about this one? Sounds particularly hard, huh?

      • marc b.
        marc b.
        August 30, 2012, 5:15 pm

        ach! that’s not german music, lefty. this is. they were still playing this in my clubbing days in the federal republic . . . last century.

        http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HhtxqvAlIpo

        ich mochte ein eisbaer sein, im kalten polar
        dann musste ich nicht mehr schrein, alles waer so klar

        ….

        eisbaer’n mussen nie weinen, eisbaer’n mussen nie weinen

        they don’t write lyrics like that anymore.

      • dbroncos
        dbroncos
        August 28, 2012, 8:33 pm

        Likewise, annie. I didn’t even consciously associate it with Germany or the German language.

      • ChasMarks
        ChasMarks
        August 29, 2012, 2:45 pm

        There’s an old Victorian neighborhood in my town. Most of the homes were built by German tradesmen; they’re 130-150 years old and solid as a rock (built pre-electricity, too).

        One of the houses (actually, a row of 3 houses) has a plaque on it that says “Built by XYZ, a German Jew . . .”

        I scratch my head.
        None of the other houses has a plaque saying, “Built by a German Christian.”

        Are the German Jew-built houses special because a Jew built them, because the Jew was German, or because the German was Jewish? Are the mortar joints tighter, the beams more true to plumb-square-and level because they were built by a German Jew?

      • libra
        libra
        August 28, 2012, 8:49 pm

        annie: stephen, fyi i don’t associate the word with nazis although i may be in the minority for my generation.

        Nor do I (for me it’s Achtung!) but I’m sure Professor Ellis does.

        And here I begin to see the outline of Phil’s cunning plan. If he keep’s dropping more and more German words into Mondoweiss then perhaps the professor will stop sending him a new post everyday.

        I certainly can’t think of another way to get the prophetic poster back into the wilderness. And if the professor has proved one thing to me beyond all doubt it’s that’s where prophets belong.

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        August 29, 2012, 2:22 pm

        @ libra
        The nearest thing to VW, the people’s car,” produced in America, is Ford, who has some baggage too. BTY, hands off Porsche too? He’s the guy that made Hitler’s little working stiff car come true. The Porsche family, like the Hitler family, are of Austrian origin.

      • Citizen
        Citizen
        August 29, 2012, 2:23 pm

        Should we get rid of:
        Angst (n.)
        Blitzkrieg (n.)
        Hinterland (n.)
        Kindergarden (n.)
        Shlep (v.)
        Verboten (adj.)
        Wunderkind

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 29, 2012, 5:15 pm

        @ Citizen
        “Blitzkrieg” is a terrible word. Get rid of that please.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 29, 2012, 8:56 pm

        What name would you give to the tactics, then?

      • lysias
        lysias
        September 7, 2012, 2:56 pm

        “Shock and awe”, maybe?

      • Stephen Shenfield
        Stephen Shenfield
        October 20, 2012, 6:58 pm

        I suggest just translating it: “Lightning war.” The strategy, by the way, was the invention of the Soviet Marshal Tukhachevsky, who was purged in 1937.

    • ChasMarks
      ChasMarks
      August 29, 2012, 3:02 pm

      What planet do you live on? I find it offensive that you think it’s offensive for a German to be proud of being German and using German words and language.

      In my town, one that’s chock-a-block with ethnic neighborhoods that celebrate their cultural heritage, the German neighborhood will host a 3-day festival in a few weeks. There will be German song-fests, dancing, an antique auto show (???), food, polka party in the street.

      Our local library has German conversation groups that meet weekly; they’ve been together for over 20 years.

      The notion of seeking to extinguish a culture is sick, if you’ll verzeih mir for saying so.

      • German Lefty
        German Lefty
        August 29, 2012, 5:12 pm

        @ ChasMarks:

        What planet do you live on? I find it offensive that you think it’s offensive for a German to be proud of being German and using German words and language.

        I assume you are talking to Stephen!? If yes, then you’ve totally misunderstood his comment. That’s not what he meant at all.

    • American
      American
      August 29, 2012, 4:35 pm

      I use Verboten occasionally, I also use some French or Spanish words occasionally.
      When writing in English it’s just a way of ‘accentuating’ something or making it stand out by using a non English language word.

      • piotr
        piotr
        August 29, 2012, 6:45 pm

        Is using Verboten Verboten?

    • piotr
      piotr
      August 29, 2012, 6:52 pm

      At least Stephen makes a progress from using Schoenfeld to little more Anglo Shenfield, but shouldn’t he go all the way and change his name to Prettyfield? Like Muellers were changed to Millers, Bach to Brooks, Schwartz to Black etc.

      • Stephen Shenfield
        Stephen Shenfield
        October 20, 2012, 7:05 pm

        Many people assume that the original form of my surname is Schoenfeld (beautiful field). In fact, it is Sheinfeld (shining field). My father changed it to Shenfield when he was naturalized as a British citizen. I don’t think these “Jewish” names are worth preserving: surnames are a modern invention. These nature-related names were imposed on European Jews by the 18th century state bureaucrats whose job it was to give Jews surnames; of course, the Jews lived in crowded ghettoes isolated from nature, it was a sort of malicious joke.

  3. annie
    annie
    August 28, 2012, 12:45 pm

    Sheldon Adelson loves Israel. He acted to kill the peace process, stated that a two state solution is the death of Israel, founded a group called One Jerusalem

    he also stated israel was his ‘number one issue’. i know i’ve heard that, perhaps in his speech carriedon the chris hayes show or a clip i heard on the real news segment w/max blumenthal.

  4. YoungMassJew
    YoungMassJew
    August 28, 2012, 1:57 pm

    Did anyone notice how the “Ideas” section of the “Boston Globe” last Sunday was dancing around the elite issue by talking about who was missing from being represented in Washington? No mention of the Zionist Hydra and its stranglehold on our politics. Surprise suprise.

  5. lysias
    lysias
    August 28, 2012, 2:41 pm

    Writes a friend: “Feeble whimsy all for this sentence: ‘Jesus and his disciples also bathed in the lake in the nude.’

    I’ve just been reading the Gospel of John, and at one point in it one of the apostles (Peter, I think) actually puts on clothes before going into the water to meet Jesus.

    • piotr
      piotr
      August 29, 2012, 6:44 pm

      This is hilarious case. Quite possibly nude swimming was the most reasonable activity in the entire trip. The guy did not have his bathing suit with him, it was dark, he had a chance to drawn with a major benefit for his district etc.

  6. Les
    Les
    August 28, 2012, 7:35 pm

    Jane Mayer knows not to go where her boss doesn’t want her to go just as David Remnick has known forever where his boss does not want him to go. How else could it be for a publication that considers itself to be an instrument of the Israel. Lobby?

  7. yourstruly
    yourstruly
    August 28, 2012, 11:29 pm

    once msm climbed aboard the israel can do no wrong bandwagon, how could they get off? what, and have to admit that the five thousand u.s. soldiers killed in iraq were offered up so as to keep the nightmare (er, dream) of a jewish palestine alive? how would that play in small town america, where most of the military cannon fodder is from. and what would be the consequences for israel firsters journalists and politicians once the word got out?

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      August 29, 2012, 2:31 pm

      @ yourstruly,
      Well, according to Mooser in a recent thread, in response to one of my comments, he said in effect that said US cannon fodder is sadist anyway, so why worry? It would be a blessing to get rid of them. He doesn’t offer anybody to substitute.

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