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‘NYT’ can’t keep its story straight on anti-Semitism in Germany

Three weeks ago the New York Times stunned its readers with a frontpage story proclaiming, “Europe’s Anti-Semitism Comes out of the Shadows.

From the immigrant enclaves of the Parisian suburbs to the drizzly bureaucratic city of Brussels to the industrial heartland of Germany, Europe’s old demon returned this summer.

The story contained numerous references to German anti-Semitism. “Gas the Jews!” yelled marchers at a pro-Palestinian protest in Germany, the story said. And a long section on “Anxiety in Germany” included this lesson from an attempted firebombing of a synagogue in Wupperthal:

“For Jews in Germany, especially for us, this has very, very deep meaning,” said Artour Gourari, a local businessman and synagogue member. “Synagogues are burning again in Germany in the night.”

OK, now fasten your neckbolts tight. Because today the New York Times has a story, on an inside page, about Jews leaving Israel for… Germany: “In Exodus From Israel to Germany, a Young Nation’s Fissures Show.” Germany sure seems like a different place than the last article:

Israelis have for years been drawn to Berlin’s cosmopolitan flair, vibrant arts scene and advanced public transportation. There are already several places in the city where one can have authentic hummus, and there is a bimonthly Hebrew-language magazine…

Asaf Moses, 32, said there were “no Israelis around” when he moved to Berlin a decade ago, but now he could hardly walk a mile from home “without picking up some Hebrew from the sidewalk.” There are at least three Israeli restaurants in Prenzlauer Berg, a central neighborhood near a synagogue and Jewish cemetery. What began as a casual monthly book exchange over coffee has grown into a Hebrew lending library with 2,000 volumes.

“Our community is growing every day,” said Diana Reizman, 32, who moved to Berlin as a student and now owns Elfenbein, a kosher cafe and caterer.

We have a simple question for the Times. Which story is correct?

These stories can’t be reconciled. You can’t have an old demon coming out of the shadows and Jews wanting to move to the country. Jews fled Nazi Germany from the time of Hitler’s ascent in the early 1930s. When synagogues burned in the night, in 1938, there was huge desperation among the Jews still in the country. It seems clear that the Times is falling prey to hasbara hysteria– not unlike Todd Gitlin saying that “Jew-hating pogroms and murders rage through Europe.”

P.S. Today’s Times piece treated the exodus of young Israelis to Berlin as part of an “adolescent” nation’s growing pains. They want a better quality of life than they can get in Tel Aviv. The Times reporter trivialized the movement by highlighting the fact that they can buy a pudding in Germany for a lot less than the same pudding in Israel. She all but ignored the fundamental  issue, that Israel is becoming a deadend politically because of the occupation and international efforts to isolate the place. Even former Clinton ambassador Marc Ginsberg says this about the young Israelis leaving, at Huffpo:

With its international standing rapidly eroding, and calls for more punishing economic boycotts against Israel’s incendiary occupation, younger Israelis — the future foundation of the state — are increasingly calling it quits. In 2013 alone, more than double the Israelis quit Israel than in 2012.

What about their participation in “incendiary” occupation? Might that be a reason they want out?

James North and Philip Weiss
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77 Responses

  1. eljay
    eljay on October 17, 2014, 11:52 am

    >> The Times reporter trivialized the movement by highlighting the fact that they can buy a pudding in Germany for a lot less than the same pudding in Israel.

    The “Jewish State”, the “Jewish homeland”, the nation-state of the Jewish people, the only place in the world where Jews can truly feel safe and at home.

    vs.

    Cheaper pudding.

    No contest.

  2. lysias
    lysias on October 17, 2014, 11:57 am

    I have the impression that anti-Semitism in Germany — and especially in Berlin — is limited to marginal groups of Muslim extremists and neo-Nazis. German experiences during and immediately after World War Two were enough to totally discredit Nazism for the great bulk of the German population. And this is particularly true of Berlin, which never voted for the Nazis, was not particularly enthusiastic about Nazi rule even when the Nazis were in power, and has a long history of harboring leftist German youth (who could escape conscription during the Cold War by living in Berlin — when I happen to have lived in Berlin myself for a couple of years.)

    • on October 17, 2014, 4:01 pm

      And I get the feeling there is virtually no anti-Semitism in Germany (unless you count the anti-Arab and anti-Muslim feeling as anti-Semitism) and that protests against the horrific actions Israel has engaged in this year are being called anti-semitic

    • American
      American on October 17, 2014, 8:39 pm

      From what I have read its mostly economical.
      Prices of housing and food are higher in Israel.
      I don’t remember the average pay in Israel but I think that it is higher in Germany.
      Also I read on here I believe from someone that Jews are exempt from military service or don’t have to register for it in Germany .
      And of course they do have mandatory military service in Israel.
      So several factors in favor of leaving Israel.

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 18, 2014, 7:57 am

        @ American
        A lot of it is economical–as in US, most of the economic profit goes to Israel’s elite. Germany did away with conscription in 2011 and it never applied to females anyway. The reverse of course is true in Israel. And yes, under former German conscription law, Jews were exempt. I would add Berlin has long been attractive to young cosmopolitans the world over, especially of the artistic and professional class except during the relatively few years of the Nazi regime.

  3. pabelmont
    pabelmont on October 17, 2014, 12:40 pm

    Maybe you can have both: [1] a resurgence of antsemitism in Germany (perhaps only in some places) and also a flow of emigrants from Israel into Germany (perhaps only into some different places).

    NYT should get its (Oh! so careless) act together and report on facts which will reconcile these two stories (or show as this essay suggests) that the Israeli immigrants into Germany are moving in, apparently happily, even in the face of actual growing antisemitism.

    The meaning of that would be: life in Germany today, even with increasing antisemitism, is better than life in Israel today.

    Could be it’s just the price of pudding of course. Maybe they’d think of ASKING the new immigrants why they moved. Ask a lot of them, get a range of answers, I’d suppose.

    Maybe North/Weiss could find someone to do the job for NYT (which would probably be reluctant to do real informative reporting on such a topic anyhow).

    Any sociologist or pollster in the house?

    • marc b.
      marc b. on October 17, 2014, 1:00 pm

      I agree. The two developments are not necessarily incompatible factually speaking, although I don’t believe that there are any valid statistics on anti-Semitism in Europe (the data have all been hopelessly polluted by the ‘new anti-Semitism’ meme.) if both cases are factually accurate, i.e. young Israelis fleeing Israel for Berlin with a simultaneous increase in anti-Semitism in Germany, as you suggest, this would be really bad news for battleship Israel.

    • John Douglas
      John Douglas on October 17, 2014, 3:34 pm

      @ Pabelmont “Could be it’s just the price of pudding of course. Maybe they’d think of ASKING the new immigrants why they moved. Ask a lot of them, get a range of answers, I’d suppose.”

      Generalizing from tiny samples would be an occupational hazard of journalists were it not for the fact that it’s damn near their occupation.

  4. jenin
    jenin on October 17, 2014, 2:13 pm

    I disagree that the two can’t be reconciled (European anti-Semitism and Israelis moving to Germany), logically at least. It could be logically true that in some places in Europe/Germany there is simmering anti-Semitism causing Jews to move or want to move, while at the same time some areas are as described in this latter article about Berlin. Or it could be the case that there is some anti-Semitism but not enough to discourage those who really want to move there.

    That said, I have absolutely no doubt that these stories are completely overblown. From my reading and time spent in Europe and interaction with many Europeans (I have a Swiss boyfriend and many, many European friends) I do not believe this to be a real problem. I think that it is used to detract from the suffering of Palestinians, or to implicitly excuse it (see, we really need Israel, otherwise we are in danger). In short, I think this post is logically flawed but at heart it’s correct. And definitely agree that it is “interesting” that they did not mention ways in which international isolation is affecting the country

  5. annie
    annie on October 17, 2014, 3:11 pm

    oh this is so interesting to me. and i was just commenting to shmuel about another article i read on this topic, translated from german as i recall, and israeli ministers freaking out at the allegations!!! now i will really have to find the article. i could swear i sent it to you phil. hot topic.

  6. pgtl10
    pgtl10 on October 17, 2014, 3:47 pm

    It seems to me that Anti-Semitism discussion is brought up for a number of reasons:

    1. Israel is losing support after slaughter the Palestinians in a pogrom

    2. Conflate Anti-Zionism with Anti-Semitism(For instance Deborah Lipstadt’s article in the NYT)

    3. Conflate Pro-Palestinian activism with Anti-Semitism

    Peter

  7. pgtl10
    pgtl10 on October 17, 2014, 3:51 pm

    Another contradiction I see in the article is that Israel’s economy doesn’t look so well. I thought Israel is booming economically according to Hasberists.

    • Horizontal
      Horizontal on October 17, 2014, 7:14 pm

      I thought Israel is booming economically according to Hasberists.

      Hey, $3 billion a year can make a lot of things in Israel seem to boom. I’ve always wondered if their economy is so damn great, why do they constantly need more of my tax money? Which is it?

      • Kay24
        Kay24 on October 17, 2014, 8:00 pm

        Despite all that arrogance and bluster, and despite their great number of billionaires and millionaires around the world, Israel cannot do without our aid:

        “Douglas Bloomfield at The Jewish Week informs us that 13,000 lobbyists from the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) will descend upon Capitol Hill this weekend for their annual conference to order members of Congress not to cut $3 billion-plus in aid to Israel, even as automatic budget cuts are set to take place in a matter of days.

        At a time when sequestration is about to take a big bite out of the Pentagon budget, the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) will be sending thousands of its citizen lobbyists to Capitol Hill next week to make sure Israel is exempted from any spending cuts.

        This could prove a very risky strategy at a time when millions of Americans will be feeling the bite of the sequestration debacle, from the defense budget to the school lunch program.

        But not aid to Israel, which will be untouched if AIPAC gets its way.

        http://antiwar.com/blog/2013/02/28/aipac-lobbyists-to-congress-despite-sequester-dont-touch-israel-aid/

        The unfortunate things is, our congress keep putting the parasitic needs of Israel OVER their own constituents. I am sure we can easily find needy Americans who will appreciate those billions of our dollars, first.

  8. Nevada Ned
    Nevada Ned on October 17, 2014, 4:23 pm

    Three years ago, the historian Juan Cole (writing in his Informed Comment blog) discussed the importance of Israeli Jewish emigration to other countries (including Germany).

    Cole says that estimated an estimated 70-80% of Israeli Jews have a second passport, “just in case”.
    Elsewhere, Cole remarks that the Jewish population in Germany is now back up to what it was on the eve of the Second World War, which I think was about 300-400K, mostly because of immigration to Germany from Russia and Israel. Some Russian Jewish emigrants moved first to Israel, and then to Germany.

    Juan Cole remarks somewhere that the Israeli government was very embarrassed at Israeli migration to Germany, because the Holocaust is a pillar of the official Israeli ideology. So much so that the Israeli government lobbied the German government, hoping to get restrictions on Israeli migration to Germany.

  9. wondering jew
    wondering jew on October 17, 2014, 4:27 pm

    I am no expert on Europe and Europe’s Jews in 2014. I think it is dangerous to dress like a Jew in certain parts of Europe and those parts of Europe are Arab neighborhoods. When things get ugly in Israel/Palestine these populations express themselves in protests and express their hatred for Jews, which is directly related to their hatred for Israel, but nonetheless is still hatred for Jews.

    I think Netanyahu’s policies promise little to Israel’s future.
    I do not know which statistics are accurate vis a vis emigration from Israel. I think the west was suffering an economic malaise the last 6 years and thus this suppressed Israeli emigration because opportunities in the west were lacking. now that the economy is improving (at least in the US, where most yordim head) there will be more yerida based upon the pent up desire that has been suppressed. I would not blame Israelis for losing hope and leaving Israel, but I am not sure that the statistics really are clear on this.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on October 17, 2014, 5:04 pm

      “express their hatred for Jews, which is directly related to their hatred for Israel, but nonetheless is still hatred for Jews.”

      Oh, come on, Yonah! You can’t tell me you don’t get a ‘kick’ every time you think about how the Jews, and their suffering, become the human shield for Zionism’s crimes?
      I mean, what a cool trick to play on the Gentiles! I mean, hey, if you’re gonna hate on Israel, you got to hate on Jews, right, cause that’s who runs Israel, right? And there’s no hatin’ on Jews allowed! That’s anti-Semitism, isn’t it? Got ’em screwed, don’t you? They’ll never past that little conundrum.

      And I thank you Yonah, for putting it so plainly.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on October 17, 2014, 5:34 pm

        Mooser, I get no kick from the troubles you enumerate. You are one sick moose.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 18, 2014, 11:49 am

        Yonah, I get no kick from champagne, mere alchohol doesn’t thrill me at all. So tell me, Yonah, why is it true, that I get a kick out of you?
        I get a kick, every time I see your comments there before me. I get a kick, tho it’s clear to me, you obviously don’t adore me.

    • Ellen
      Ellen on October 17, 2014, 10:23 pm

      I am no expert on Europe and Europe’s Jews in 2014. … as he dives into a deep opinion on something he knows nothing about.

      No Yonah, you are no expert and have no experience with Jews immigrating to Europe. So why do you then go onto to state that you think it is dangerous to dress as a Jew in Europe?

      I lived in the center of Europe for years and was a freak in my neighborhood because I did not wear a wig and my husband did not wear a 18th century polish fur hat on the sabbath. Believe me, my neighbors were not in danger.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on October 19, 2014, 3:40 pm

        Ellen- It would be interesting to see statistics regarding hate crimes in western europe, how many incidents of anti muslim violence how many incidents of anti jewish violence. if you presented me with those statistics your anecdote would be presented in a journalistic context.

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 19, 2014, 4:16 pm

        @ yonah fredman

        2012 Report on Hate Crimes in Western Europe:

        http://tandis.odihr.pl/hcr2011/pdf/Hate_Crime_Report_full_version.pdf

        Selected snippet:

        Germany: Official law-enforcement figures recorded 1,239 anti-Semitic crimes, 29 of which involved violence.295 The Amadeu Antonio Foundation reported five cases of physical assault, one of which involved serious injury, five cases of vandalism to Holocaust memorials, four cases of vandalism to Jewish memorials, three cases of cemetery desecration, one case of graffiti and one case of arson of a residence.296

        Germany: Official law-enforcement figures record 2,528 xenophobic crimes, 373 of which involved violence, and 484 racist crimes, 71 of which involved violence.190

    • Talkback
      Talkback on October 18, 2014, 4:09 am

      “When things get ugly in Israel/Palestine these populations express themselves in protests and express their hatred for Jews, which is directly related to their hatred for Israel, but nonetheless is still hatred for Jews.”

      They don’t hate Jews as being Jews, but because of what Israel’s Jews do to Palestinians. Who can blame them?

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on October 19, 2014, 3:43 pm

        talkback- there are those antizionists who are in favor of jew hatred, as in, “don’t apply the brakes, let the nature of hatred and warmaking take its own course and so all hatred aimed in that direction is emotion which should flow and not be dammed”. maybe you agree with that. I’m not sure. I view such talk as fighting words and those who enunciate them as enemies.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 11:20 am

        “there are those antizionists who are in favor of jew hatred, as in, “don’t apply the brakes, let the nature of hatred and warmaking take its own course and so all hatred aimed in that direction is emotion which should flow and not be dammed”. “

        There are, Yonah? Can you name any? Yonah, you must be able to name at least one, since you are quoting somebody aren’t you? Or did you pull that quote out of your butt? That’s called lying, Yonah.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 12:50 pm

        ” if you presented me with those statistics your anecdote would be presented in a journalistic context.”

        Oh, I see. You are presenting things in a “journalistic context”. Must be a “journalistic context” with a wavelength between 570 and 590 nm.

      • wondering jew
        wondering jew on October 21, 2014, 10:05 pm

        mooser- Rantisi is dead. But he was a jew hater. and maybe he just hated Jews or maybe he saw it as a means to an end. i think gilad atzmon fits into the category, although because he’s jewish that makes him a special case. i think dieudonne of france fits into the category, although again he might just hate jews and not view it as a means to an end.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 22, 2014, 2:14 pm

        “mooser- Rantisi is dead. But he was a jew hater.”

        Is that a quote from Rantisi ? “don’t apply the brakes, let the nature of hatred and warmaking take its own course and so all hatred aimed in that direction is emotion which should flow and not be dammed”

        Is that a quote from Rantisi?

    • jon s
      jon s on October 18, 2014, 12:13 pm

      The statistics are – and I’m sorry to disappoint some of you- that emigration from Israel is at a 40-year low.

      I’ve also heard that in much of Europe Jews are afraid of wearing a kippah in public these days.

      • hophmi
        hophmi on October 18, 2014, 3:39 pm

        As usual, Mondoweiss is belittling European antisemitism. This story of Israelis moving to Berlin is covered far out of proportion to its actual significance. The truth, as you point out Jon, is almost exactly the opposite of what Mondoweiss reports here.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel on October 18, 2014, 4:30 pm

        The truth … is almost exactly the opposite of what Mondoweiss reports here.

        So what is the truth about “European anti-Semitism” (implying some sort of equivalence between Dublin and Budapest, Paris and Milan, Copenhagen and Brussels, Prague and Barcelona, Amsterdam and Kiev and so on)? What is the truth about anti-Semitism in Berlin?

        Time Magazine has admitted it exaggerated with its “Exodus” story, the FRA survey is so subjective and confused as to tell us hardly anything, and some of the recent incidents repeatedly cited in the media have been partially or completely misreported (including one in my city).

        Yes, there are places (such as Hungary) in which anti-Semitism — along with anti-Ziganism and other forms of racism and discrimination — is a matter of great concern. There have been a few violent incidents against Jews and Jewish institutions in Sweden, Germany, France and Belgium (definitely not to be minimised), and demonstrations against Israel during the Gaza massacre have, in places slid into or legitimised anti-Semitism — but I very much doubt that the adjectives attached to such incidents (“common”, “frequent”, “widespread”) are accurate. In Italy, strong and vocal positions against anti-Semitism were taken by Palestinian and Palestinian solidarity groups, at the height of the Gaza massacre, declaring zero tolerance for anti-Semitism — not as a tactic, but as a matter of principle.

        The climate in Europe’s weaker economies is not pretty right now, and populists are certainly trying to fan the flames of racism and hatred, but only rarely against Jews. In most European societies, Jews are no longer acceptable or satisfying scapegoats, with so many minority groups to choose from: immigrants in general, E. Europeans, Roma, blacks, Arabs, Muslims, etc. There was a large demonstration in Milano today, uniting neo-Fascist groups such as Forza Nuova and Casa Pound, under the leadership of the Northern League, and Jews were not even mentioned, nor could such a demonstration against Jews have taken place. The target was, of course, immigrants — particularly Africans, Arabs and Muslims.

        Wearing a kippah may be an issue in some places, but wearing a kippah in public is a relatively recent phenomenon in most parts of Europe — and mostly where large Jewish communities exist. When I was a child in Canada I was always told to wear a hat rather than a kippah in areas where Jews are few and far between — partly out of fear of anti-Semitism (more imagined than real at the time, although I did have some unpleasant encounters), but mostly because kippot are strange, out of the ordinary, make you stick out when you have absolutely no desire to so. Try wearing an Islamic head-covering and see what happens.

        So yes, there is anti-Semitism in Europe and it must be taken seriously. There is also a lot of mystification and exploitation of anti-Semitism that has little to do with actually keeping Jews safe.

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 18, 2014, 4:51 pm

        @ jon s

        2010 analysis of net Israeli emigration-immigration rates:
        “… the fact that Israel is manifesting migration balance rates for Jews that roughly match those of South African whites six to seven years prior to that country‘s massive political transformation lends some credence to the view that under current conditions Jewish emigration from Israel must be understood as significant, not only in demographic terms, and not just in the context of polemics about Israelis policies toward occupied territories, but as a possible harbinger of the potential for Israel to exhibit the kind of dramatic change that societies undergo when they approach the limit of their socio-political carrying capacity. http://www.aisisraelstudies.org/papers/AIS2010_Lustick.pdf

      • Shingo
        Shingo on October 19, 2014, 1:24 am

        The statistics are – and I’m sorry to disappoint some of you- that emigration from Israel is at a 40-year low. –

        What statistics are those Jon?

        The last time you embarrassed yourself with similar claims about human shields in Gaza you got thumped by a reality check.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 11:22 am

        “I’ve also heard that in much of Europe Jews are afraid of wearing a kippah in public these days.”

        What can you say? Hey, in 1968 I was afraid to wear bell-bottoms. And then, at some point in the 70’s, I was afraid to take them off. Tastes in clothing change.-

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 20, 2014, 12:07 pm

        @ jon s

        What’s the net statistics? As of 2014, trend shows immigration to Israel has been slowing– except for France.

        http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/middle_east/immigration-to-israel-slowing-except-from-france/2014/01/24/162861b8-8416-11e3-a273-6ffd9cf9f4ba_story.html

      • Kris
        Kris on October 20, 2014, 1:10 pm

        “I’ve also heard that in much of Europe Jews are afraid of wearing a kippah in public these days. ”

        Think about all the U.S. citizens who sewed Canadian maple leaf appliques to their backpacks when they travelled abroad. They didn’t want to be associated with the carnage that was caused by U.S. armed forces. While everyone liked Canadians (peacemakers, polite), many people hated Americans (wanton destroyers, bullies).

        To me, and probably much of the rest of the world, a kippah looks like support for horrific and ongoing crimes against humanity. It looks like an endorsement of racism, land theft, and ethnic cleansing.

        Unfair, since Judaism:Zionism as Christianity:Ku Klux Klan, but understandable, given how hard Israel works at promoting the idea that it represents all Jews.

  10. Mooser
    Mooser on October 17, 2014, 4:56 pm

    “I think it is dangerous to dress like a Jew in certain parts of Europe and those parts of Europe are Arab neighborhoods.”

    Well, Yonah, of course it is! When you wear custom-made Armani suits and are shod in bespoke, hand-crafted Italian foot-wear of rich Corinthian leather, people naturally think there’s a lot of pelf in your wallet.

    But what happens if you dress like a Jew, but walk like an Egyptian?

    • jon s
      jon s on October 19, 2014, 2:37 am

      Shmuel,
      You may be in a better position than other commenters here to assess the anti-Semitic threat in Europe, as long as you don’t engage in wishful thinking.
      Some statistics appear here:

      http://antisemitism.org.il/list/4?lang=en

      • jon s
        jon s on October 19, 2014, 2:47 am

        Shingo,
        From the Central Bureau of Statistics .In fairness I should point out that the most recent year for which data is available is 2012, so if there was a significant shift this year, it doesn’t show up there yet.
        I’m not aware of having been “thumped” regarding Hamas’ crimes. I stand by everything I wrote on that topic.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel on October 19, 2014, 4:08 am

        You may be in a better position than other commenters here to assess the anti-Semitic threat in Europe, as long as you don’t engage in wishful thinking.

        I’m not a wishful thinking type of guy, but how can I take screaming headlines and “statistics” seriously when “Insulting video: On 17th July protesters published a short film on YouTube in which they erased the State of Israel. Four suspects were arrested. The leader of the gang was identified” (from your link) is listed under the heading “Sharp Rise in Jew-Hatred”?

        How can I tell whether there is a rise or not, when anti-Semitism is spotlighted more than ever before (almost certainly for political reasons — including dismissal of criticism of Israel, and dwindling “aliyah” ), and reporting of incidents is now actively solicited (e.g. I saw an ad for an anti-Semitism hotline in a local Jewish paper — in a country with one of the lowest incidences of anti-Semitism in Europe)?

        How can I take Jewish leaders seriously when they say things like “Within ten years we will see a return to Auschwitz — and all Jews in this country must therefore make aliyah as soon as possible” (statement by the president of the Rome Jewish community after the last general election, due to the rise of a “post-political” party with some right-wing tendencies — although said president has openly supported the actual far right, based on its pro-Israel positions)?

        Yes, I live in Europe (as noted, in a country with a very low incidence of anti-Semitism), and have a feel for wider European trends and issues (particularly within the EU), but there is so much confusion and manipulation of this issue, that I find it very hard to take any of the reports (including an extremely shameful one by the Italian parliament — chaired by an Italian-Israeli who has declared that she was only in parliament to serve Israel’s interests) or statistics at face value.

        Another aspect of the current focus on anti-Semitism that I find particularly disturbing is that it often entails anti-Arab, anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim insinuations, fanning the flames of racism and prejudice — supposedly in the name of fighting racism and prejudice. When I hear French Jews in Israel say that they left France because it was “full of Arabs”, with no further explanation or qualification, it really makes me wonder about the source of their unease and fears. Once again, this is not to say that some fears are not justified or that anti-Semitism is not on the rise, but it makes it really hard to get to the bottom of things.

        The first step to understanding and combating the phenomenon is a clear distinction between criticism of Israel and prejudice against Jews. As long as the nonsense about the “new anti-Semitism” continues, real anti-Semitism will go unnoticed and unchecked. It’s also high time to start taking European criticism of Israeli policies seriously, instead of just dismissing it as “traditional European” or “Muslim” “anti-Semitism” — an attitude that is not merely politically self-serving (albeit self-harming, in the long run), but is also, in itself, tainted with racism.

      • Shmuel
        Shmuel on October 19, 2014, 4:15 am

        By the way, the site you linked to (the Coordination Forum for Countering Antisemitism) is an Israeli state forum, and as such, pursues Israeli state interests.

        http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%94%D7%A4%D7%95%D7%A8%D7%95%D7%9D_%D7%9C%D7%AA%D7%99%D7%90%D7%95%D7%9D_%D7%94%D7%9E%D7%90%D7%91%D7%A7_%D7%91%D7%90%D7%A0%D7%98%D7%99%D7%A9%D7%9E%D7%99%D7%95%D7%AA

        As a European Jew, I often feel that I am being held hostage to Israel’s political and ideological interests.

      • Shingo
        Shingo on October 19, 2014, 7:15 am

        I’m not aware of having been “thumped” regarding Hamas’ crimes. I stand by everything I wrote on that topic.

        You claimed the BS about human shields and Hamas using launching from hospitals and mosques was an accepted fact – until it was pointed out to you it wasn’t.

        Some statistics appear here:

        You’re cited that web site before and it’s pretty lame, and reads like an ADL type hysteria. It lists what it calls anti Semitic attacks without detailing what those attacks are – some a little more than verbal insults.

        From the Central Bureau of Statistics

        Who’s central bureau

      • American
        American on October 19, 2014, 10:27 am

        @ jon s

        ”Some statistics appear here:

        link to antisemitism.org.il
        >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

        Well that is one of the most puke worthy orgs and reports I have seen.
        When are going you get out of the cult and realize that Isr orgs, ADL and orgs like the Southern Poverty Law Center are more interested in shit stirring and race and religion ‘baiting’ than truth and facts. Just like Isr and ADL, a lot of these phony ‘civil rights orgs exist to stir shit—without shit stirring and hyping they lose their reason for existence.

        I haven’t looked up the European equivalent of the US FBI Hate Crimes report but the claims of the ADL and the other Z-orgs claim about Jewish hate crimes are ridiculous. You can be sure they lie about the stats there just as they do about the US stats.
        The FBI hasn’t released the full 2013 report but did release a statement that US hate crimes were down by 5% the first half of 2013.
        The last full report was 2012. There’s quite a difference between the 5,700 hate crimes and the *250,000* hate crimes the ADL and the SPLC claim in the US.

        http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr/hate-crime/2012/topic-pages/incidents-and-offenses/incidentsandoffenses_final

        Incidents and Offenses
        Download Printable Document

        The Uniform Crime Reporting Program collects data about both single-bias and multiple-bias hate crimes. For each offense type reported, law enforcement must indicate at least one bias motivation. A single-bias incident is defined as an incident in which one or more offense types are motivated by the same bias. A multiple-bias incident is defined as an incident in which more than one offense type occurs and at least two offense types are motivated by different biases.

        In 2012, 1,730 law enforcement agencies reported 5,796 hate crime incidents involving 6,718 offenses.
        There were 5,790 single-bias incidents that involved 6,705 offenses, 7,151 victims, and 5,322 offenders.
        The 6 multiple­-bias incidents reported in 2012 involved 13 offenses, 13 victims, and 9 offenders. (See Tables 1 and 12.)
        Single-bias incidents
        Analysis of the 5,790 single-bias incidents reported in 2012 revealed that:

        48.3 percent were racially motivated.
        19.6 percent resulted from sexual-orientation bias.
        19.0 percent were motivated by religious bias.
        11.5 percent stemmed from ethnicity/national origin bias.
        1.6 percent were prompted by disability bias. (Based on Table 1.)
        Offenses by bias motivation within incidents
        Of the 6,705 single-bias hate crime offenses reported in the above incidents:

        49.2 percent stemmed from racial bias.
        19.7 percent were motivated by sexual-orientation bias.
        17.4 percent resulted from religious bias.
        12.3 percent were prompted by ethnicity/national origin bias.
        1.5 percent resulted from biases against disabilities. (Based on Table 1.)
        Racial bias
        In 2012, law enforcement agencies reported that 3,297 single-bias hate crime offenses were racially motivated. Of these offenses:

        66.1 percent were motivated by anti-black bias.
        22.4 percent stemmed from anti-white bias.
        4.1 percent resulted from anti-Asian/Pacific Islander bias.
        4.1 percent were a result of bias against groups of individuals consisting of more than one race (anti-multiple races, group).
        3.3 percent were motivated by anti-American Indian/Alaskan Native bias. (Based on Table 1.)

        Religious bias
        Hate crimes motivated by religious bias accounted for 1,166 offenses reported by law enforcement. A breakdown of the bias motivation of religious-biased offenses showed:

        59.7 percent were anti-Jewish.
        12.8 percent were anti-Islamic.
        7.6 percent were anti-multiple religions, group.
        6.8 percent were anti-Catholic.
        2.9 percent were anti-Protestant.
        1.0 percent were anti-Atheism/Agnosticism/etc.
        9. 2 percent were anti-other (unspecified) religion. (Based on Table 1.)
        Sexual-orientation bias
        In 2012, law enforcement agencies reported 1,318 hate crime offenses based on sexual-orientation bias. Of these offenses:

        54.6 percent were classified as anti-male homosexual bias.
        28.0 percent were reported as anti-homosexual bias.
        12.3 percent were prompted by an anti-female homosexual bias.
        3.1 percent were classified as anti-bisexual bias.
        2.0 percent were the result of an anti-heterosexual bias. (Based on Table 1.)
        Ethnicity/national origin bias
        Of the single-bias incidents, 822 offenses were committed based on the offenders’ bias toward the perceived ethnicity or national origin of the victim. Of these offenses:

        59.4 percent were anti-Hispanic bias.
        40.6 percent were anti-other ethnicity/national origin bias. (Based on Table 1.)
        Disability bias
        There were 102 reported hate crime offenses committed based on disability bias. Of these:

        82 offenses were classified as anti-mental disability.
        20 offenses were reported as anti-physical disability. (See Table 1.)
        By offense types
        Of the 6,718 reported hate crime offenses in 2012:

        28.4 percent were destruction/damage/vandalism.
        23.4 percent were simple assault.
        22.2 percent were intimidation.
        12.7 percent were aggravated assault.
        The remainder were comprised of additional crimes against persons and property. (Based on Table 2.)
        Offenses by crime category
        Among the 6,718 hate crime offenses reported:

        59.1 percent were crimes against persons.
        37.9 percent were crimes against property.
        The remainder were crimes against society. (Based on Table 2.) (See Data Collection in Methodology.)
        Crimes against persons
        Law enforcement reported 3,968 hate crime offenses as crimes against persons. By offense type:

        39.6 percent were simple assault.
        37.5 percent were intimidation.
        21.5 percent were aggravated assault.
        0.6 percent consisted of 10 murders and 15 forcible rapes.
        0.8 percent involved the offense category other, which is collected only in the National Incident-Based Reporting System. (Based on Table 2.)
        The majority of the 2,547 hate crime offenses that were crimes against property (74.8 percent) were acts of destruction/damage/vandalism.
        The remaining 25.2 percent of crimes against property consisted of robbery, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, and other crimes. (Based on Table 2.)
        Crimes against property
        The majority of the 2,547 hate crime offenses that were crimes against property (74.8 percent) were acts of destruction/damage/vandalism.
        The remaining 25.2 percent of crimes against property consisted of robbery, burglary, larceny-theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, and other crimes. (Based on Table 2.)
        Crimes against society
        There were 203 offenses defined as crimes against society (e.g., drug or narcotic offenses or prostitution).

        By victim type
        When considering the type of victims among the reported 6,718 hate crime offenses:

        79.6 percent were directed at individuals.
        4.6 percent were against businesses or financial institutions.
        3.0 percent were against society.
        2.9 percent were against government.
        2.7 percent were against religious organizations.
        The remaining 7.2 percent were directed at other, multiple, or unknown victim types. (Based on Table 6.)

        696 incidents involving attacks on Jewishness, out of 325 million people in the US, the bulk of which were defacement of property.
        OMG!, its a holocaust. Not.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 11:30 am

        Gosh, all I can say is, as an American Jew, this thread and the statistical evidence presented leaves me with a big problem. I mean, when it comes to being discriminated against, or even the object of hate crimes, who do I compare myself to? I mean, shall I as a minority, compare myself to the treatment endured by other minorities and out-groups in America. By comparison to them, I am blessed with an absence of active prejudice. That would be my bent, to compare myself with them, think that I was blessed, and that they shouyld be treated as well as Jews are.
        Okay, that works for me, but would it be fair to Judaism? Perhaps not! I mean, look who it puts us in with! Why, it’s almost anti-Semitic to think like that!
        Nope, the only thing which is fair to Judaism is to compare the treatment of Jews with the assaults suffered by the most elite portion of the white population.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 11:38 am

        “I’m not aware of having been “thumped” regarding Hamas’ crimes”

        ROTFLMSJAO! No, you are probably not aware of having been “thumped” because you always run away when you are shown to be wrong, or mendacious.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 20, 2014, 12:56 pm

        , “as long as you don’t engage in wishful thinking.”

        Okay, you caught me, “Jon s”! I’ve never had an Armani suit or custom-made shoes.

  11. Ellen
    Ellen on October 17, 2014, 10:46 pm

    Real life anecdote: In the late 90’s while still in Germany and walking my two little mongrel dogs in a field along the Rhine, a woman rather aggressively, (in my opinion) approached me about my dogs and the danger they are to her sheep and that I must remove myself from the fields.

    My first response to her was to admire and praise her for her sheep — which I truly found beautiful. That was preeminent at that moment in my mind over the perceived threat in her mind that my lame and elderly half bind small dogs posed to her sheep.

    With that she chilled and we entered a nice conversation. She was an Israeli Vet and had just immigrated to central Germany. She had a small and large animal practice with her German “lebensgefharten” — life partner.

    Over the next weeks/months we would meet in the fields along the Rhein as I walked my dogs and she would tend to her wonderful prize sheep. We had many nice conversations. She was not alone. There were other Israelis among her circle who had immigrated back to Germany for professional and personal reasons: They had great professional opportunities, they had a great sense of belonging (Jews have been in Central Germany — Rhineland — since the 2nd Century AD).

    And life was good. A prosperous vet practice not too far from Frankfurt, along the Rein. Friends from around the world. Greater opportunities for her children. A deep sense of security and belonging. Family roots that went hundreds of years. This is what what my acquaintance from Israel shared with me on our walks along the Rein.

    • Ellen
      Ellen on October 17, 2014, 10:49 pm

      Sorry no edit feature here. Apologies for misspellings.

    • bilal a
      bilal a on October 18, 2014, 1:22 am

      North and Weiss can easily reconcile the NYT reports Indigeneous Europeans resent Russian-Israeli displacement, privilege, and sometimes criminality, and Israelis appreciate the same opportunities .

      This explains the self segregation described above, but there is another factor, Israeli (Russian sic) organized crime. in Europe, in which Berlin functions as HQ,. This has attracted US State dept concern.

      ¶20. (SBU) Israel’s multi-ethnic population provides a deep well of
      opportunity for Israeli OC to expand into new territory. Most
      Israeli crime families trace their roots to North Africa or Eastern
      Europe, and many of their Israeli operatives hold foreign passports
      allowing them to move freely in European countries, most of which
      participate in the visa waiver program with the United States.
      Approximately one million Russians moved to Israel following the
      dissolution of the Soviet Union, and Russian citizens no longer
      require visas to enter Israel. Many Russian oligarchs of Jewish
      origin and Jewish members of OC groups have received Israeli
      citizenship, or at least maintain residences in the country. Little
      is known about the full extent of Russian criminal activity in
      Israel, but sources in the police estimate that Russian OC has
      laundered as much as USD 10 billion through Israeli holdings. While
      most Israeli OC families are native-born and the stereotype that
      Russian immigrants tend to be mobsters is greatly overblown,
      indigenous OC groups routinely employ “muscle” from the former
      Soviet Union.

      https://wikileaks.org/cable/2009/05/09TELAVIV1098.html

      Berlin is the centre of the Russian mafia in Europe

      http://flarenetwork.org/learn/europe/article/berlin_is_the_centre_of_the_russian_mafia_in_europe.htm

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 20, 2014, 5:50 pm

        The most commonly held beliefs among the ADL’s list of 11 statements that the ADL thinks suggests anti-Semitism was that Jews are more loyal to Israel than to their home country — a view held by 41 percent of respondents polled around the world. More than one-third agreed with the statements that Jews have too much power in the business world and in international financial markets, that Jews think they are better than other people and that Jews don’t care what happens to anyone but their own kind.

        “The ADL’s Global 100 index will serve as a baseline,” Foxman said. “For the first time we have a real sense of how pervasive and persistent anti-Semitism is today around the world.”
        The survey gauged anti-Semitism by asking whether respondents agreed with an index of 11 statements that the ADL believes suggest anti-Jewish bias: Jews talk too much about what happened to them during the Holocaust; Jews are more loyal to Israel than to the countries they live in; Jews think they are better than other people; Jews have too much power in international financial markets; Jews have too much power in the business world; Jews have too much control over global affairs; people hate Jews because of the way Jews behave; Jews have too much control over the U.S. government; Jews have too much control over global media; Jews are responsible for most of the world’s wars; Jews don’t care about what happens to anyone but their own kind.
        Respondents who agreed that a majority of the statements are “probably true” were deemed anti-Semitic.

        The survey also questioned respondents about their attitudes toward Israel. Outside the Middle East, Israel’s favorable rating was 37 percent, compared to 26 percent unfavorable. Within the Middle East, Israel’s unfavorable rating rose to 84 percent. The only other region where Israel’s unfavorable rating outweighed its favorable was Asia: 30 percent unfavorable, compared to 26 percent favorably.

        Read more: http://www.jta.org/2014/05/13/news-opinion/world/survey-more-than-a-quarter-of-the-world-hates-jews#ixzz3GixGrr95

  12. hophmi
    hophmi on October 18, 2014, 9:32 am

    Your argument is completely idiotic. Emigration of Hispanics to the United States is way, way up. Therefore, there must be no anti-immigrant hatred in the United States.

    The number of Israelis who have emigrated to Berlin is far smaller than the number of European Jews who have emigrated to Israel. That should tell you all you need to know.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on October 18, 2014, 11:55 am

      “That should tell you all you need to know.”

      Isn’t that what God said when he gave Moses the Ten Commandments? Well, even if He didn’t, he sure doesn’t give it the same oomph you do, Hophmi!

      • hophmi
        hophmi on October 18, 2014, 12:39 pm

        As I said and as Mooser confirms, the argument that because a few thousand Israelis moved to Berlin, there is no antisemitism in Germany, is a stupid argument.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 19, 2014, 1:12 pm

        I’m sorry, Hophmii, it’s a long involved thread. Just who was it made : “the argument that because a few thousand Israelis moved to Berlin, there is no antisemitism in Germany,”?

        I can’t recall anybody stuffing that straw man except you.

    • Keith
      Keith on October 18, 2014, 4:29 pm

      HOPHMI- “Your argument is completely idiotic. Emigration of Hispanics to the United States is way, way up. Therefore, there must be no anti-immigrant hatred in the United States.”

      Interesting argument. As you should be aware, the emigration of Hispanics to the United States is large in spite of anti-immigrant feelings in the US. This is because these desperate people are fleeing the intolerable conditions in their countries which have resulted from US policies towards Latin America. And while Israel has not been subjected to this type of economic and physical oppression, it would appear that a fair number of Israelis are also fleeing Israel in search of friendlier and safer climes. As for emigration from Israel versus immigration into Israel, I believe that for the last 8 years or so they are about the same, rendering your comment about Berlin versus Europe a disingenuous distraction.

  13. American
    American on October 18, 2014, 10:33 am

    Zio picks fight with White Nationalist—–Zio loses.

    Randy Scheunemann of the Emergency Committee for Israel and PNAC charges club member with racism and gets himself dumped instead. I am sure someone is going to blame it on anti semitism.

    ”’When a top GOP foreign-policy aide met a well-connected white nationalist at a mountain ski resort, a long-simmering right-wing feud almost came to blows”

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/10/18/a-racist-s-crazy-ski-resort-imbroglio.html

    ” This time, with ample evidence to back his case, Scheuneman complained to the club’s organizers, outraged that they had offered someone (especially a highly controversial public figure) full membership without consulting other members, an apparent breach of protocol. And so Scheunemann offered an ultimatum: Kick Spencer out, or he would leave.

    The club chose to keep Spencer.
    None of its leaders responded to queries from The Daily Beast.

    Asked for comment, Spencer replied, “Randy Scheunemann has given you a gross mischaracterization of events. However, I will not elaborate for the simple reason that this is a private matter involving a private organization. I refuse to bring private matters into a public discussion.”
    >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    I am not going to call White Nationalism a ‘trend’ yet. But there are lots of examples in out of the way stories that nationalism or something similar is making a comeback among the public and some proponents of it are accepted in elite social circles. And in those news stories are also examples that more people are fed up with US Israelites like Scheunemann and their Zionistas stomping around the US like they own the place.

    ”Beware the beginnings, consider the end”..would be good advice to all the supreme groups.

    • Mooser
      Mooser on October 18, 2014, 11:58 am

      So, American, you figure White Nationalism is the antidote to Zionism? I can’t think of two groups more likely to be at each other’s throats. I hope they don’t leave hickies.

    • hophmi
      hophmi on October 18, 2014, 12:37 pm

      Right, because at Mondoweiss, Jews and Neo-Nazis are the same thing.

      • Citizen
        Citizen on October 18, 2014, 1:23 pm

        @ hophmi
        You equate all Jews with Zionism, not Mooser or Mondoweiss.

      • eljay
        eljay on October 18, 2014, 11:12 pm

        >> Citizen: @ hophmi
        >> You equate all Jews with Zionism …

        Conflating all Jews with Zio-supremacism gives Zio-supremacists the buffer of patsies they need should the sh*t ever hit the fan.

      • Mooser
        Mooser on October 19, 2014, 1:20 pm

        “Right, because at Mondoweiss, Jews and Neo-Nazis are the same thing.”

        What on earth are you on about Hoph? “Randy Scheunemann of the Emergency Committee for Israel and PNAC” is the person under discussion. Hardly a neo-Nazi. A “neo-liberal” or “neo-conservative”, possibly. No one is calling him a neo-Nazi. Are you?

  14. Bandolero
    Bandolero on October 18, 2014, 8:05 pm

    As someone who lives in Berlin, I just want to say what’s going on here:

    There is a fairly small community of people going out to Anti-Israeli/Anti-Zionist demonstrations like the “Quds day.” I happened to participate in that demonstration this year. There were about 2000 people there on that “major event” – coming this year at a time of the Israeli massacre in Gaza. Besides the demonstration all way right and left there were pro-Israeli counter-demonstrators led by the Israeli ambassador and some German politicians trying to provoke the participants of the demonstrators to say or shout anything anti-semitic, lot’s of pro-Israeli journalists looking for any chance to find proof of anti-semitsm in the anti-Israeli demonstration and large police forces instructed by Israel-friendly politicians to go in consequently against anything anti-semitic and directly arrest people. But, in Berlin Quds day they didn’t manage to find anything. The people demonstrating were very aware of the Zionist intention to conflate criticism of Israel with anti-semitism. Besides Shia and German lefties there were many jews critical of Israel participating in the anti-Israeli demonstration. After the demonstration I read in the media that there had been one occurence were one participant was reported to have shouted something anti-semitic. I haven’t heard anything and police said in a statement they didn’t hear such a thing neither. If their really was one person on the demonstration, a youth or agent provocateur or whatever, shouting one time an anti-semitic slogan, of course, I don’t know because I wasn’t always everywhere. And, thouigh the mood on the demonstration was clearly not anti-semitic, of course, it’s hard to prevent one guy coming to a demonstration, taking a place in front of hungrily waiting cameras and shouting something contrary to the intentions of the rest of the demonstration. I’m told the situation with other anti-Israeli demonstration in Germany is quite the same. The one on which the NYT reported anti-semitism, was, if I remember it correctly, organized by the left party, where absolutely no anti-semitism is found. But, of course, it’s hard to prevent that one guy, or a small group of saboteurs and agents provocateuers, comes to your demo and shouts something to the contrary in front of cameras. The local pro-israeli community has a lot of experierence in staging such intrusion events and other provocations, and the NYT and other zionist media willfully collaborate with such behaviour. That’s the background of the NYT story. It’s obviously a propaganda job to tar anti-Israeli protests as anti-semitic.

    Regarding the existence of anti-semitism in Germany, it’s true that there exists anti-semitism, albeit much fewer as prejedices against muslims, Turks and arabs. My impression is that anti-semitism is mostly found in the higher echolons of better society in Germany, it is usually only whispered, and comes from anti-semites who usually brand themselves as good friends of Israel. Typical anti-semitism in Germany is whisper like one has to be nice to Israel, because, you know, after Germany and Hitler lost it, jews rule the world, and so, if you want to have a career, you must show your support for the jews and Israel, whether you like them or not. Other forms of anti-semitism are sometimes anonymous graffitis like “Against the Judenrepublik” (jewish republic) which are quickly overpainted. Violent anti-semitism is almost completely absent. Jewish poeple immigrating to Germany have in the daily life absolutely no problem with antisemitism here in Berlin. It’s quite the opposite, like a preferrential status: if one is jewish it can open some doors. Berlin is in reality very multi cultural and quite tolerant in all directions.

    I hope this comment helps to get a clue which piece of the NYT is propaganda lies and which is not. James and Phil got it essentially right.

    • German Lefty
      German Lefty on October 20, 2014, 5:39 pm

      “Other forms of anti-semitism are sometimes anonymous graffitis like “Against the Judenrepublik” (jewish republic) which are quickly overpainted.”

      I had to look up “Judenrepublik”. At first, I thought that this word refers to Israel. Then the slogan would have been anti-Israel, not anti-Semitic. However, it turns out that Germany is meant by that. Strange.

  15. eGuard
    eGuard on October 19, 2014, 12:57 pm

    In the NYT: “Our community is growing every day,” said Diana Reizman, 32, who moved to Berlin

    This is where it gets creepy. Every Jew in Berlin is drafted into the “our community”. You weren’t trying to assimilate, were you?

  16. Jonas
    Jonas on October 19, 2014, 3:45 pm

    There hasn´t been a shout like “jews into gas” ord “HAMAS, HAMAS, Jews into gas!” . It is not correct. The guy who wrote this was wrong:

    http://tapferimnirgendwo.com/2014/07/13/wenn-es-dunkel-wird-in-gelsenkirchen-juden-ins-gas/

    At the demo he reffered to nobody screams it. And there is no other evidence!

    So please correct your NEWS!

    • annie
      annie on October 19, 2014, 4:50 pm

      jonas, the video in your link, the offending chanting spelled out was in arabic (oh jews, muslim army will return). maybe the police didn’t understand it which is was not reflected in the police report. of course i don’t speak german so i can’t tell what they were shouting although the report said about 200 people were at that protest (it was not at the one w/2,000 people, according to google translate) and one of the slogans on the sign, about ‘israel child murders’ is accurate, therefore i wouldn’t classify it was anti semitic. however, there was one sign ‘jews are beasts’, or something to that effect, i agree is very antisemitic, but i’d argue it is only one sign. chanting is quite common at protests, there’s nothing at the link providing evidence the protest was violent.

      and they provided a source saying a neo nazi group was there. does gernamy allow neo nazi groups? i thought they were illegal in germany.

      • Jonas
        Jonas on October 20, 2014, 8:34 am

        Hey Annie,

        the writer of the linked blog writes many times that the demonstrators have shouted “Jews into gas”. He has no evidence though he refers to the video he linked. This unproved story that people shouted “Jews into gas” was written in many german newspapers and many politicians refered to it, without any prove! Even in arabic nobody has shouted it.

        Correct is the “Chaibar-Shouting”. But there is a great difference between Chaibar-Shouting and “Jews into gas”, no?

        The demo in Frankfurt w/2000 people: The organizer, who was just a unexperienced guy from facebook, was overwhelmed by the response of his spontaneous demonstration, as he said afterwards. He was offered to use the policecar-speaker to get some control. Yes, “jews are beast” -which was tried to erase naivly – is antisemetic.

        Some Nazis were there but not as anybody could see. The people (antigerman) who knew that they were Nazis didn´t do anything to tell it anybody and didn´t do anything to throw them out; they only posted that they knew that there are some of them at the demo; only mourning afterwards… But on other demonstrations nazis were not accepted at all and also thrown out.

        There have been a lot of declarations from palestinian organizations that they don´t want any Nazis on there demonstrations; but nobody asked them for there opinion.

        Some groups of Neonazis are forbidden but if a nazi opens up another group that hasn´t the clear neonazism/violence-shit, than the state can´t even forbid them.

        sincerly, Jonas

      • annie
        annie on October 20, 2014, 9:10 pm

        jonas, regarding “correcting our news” ..what we reported was accurate

        The story contained numerous references to German anti-Semitism. “Gas the Jews!” yelled marchers at a pro-Palestinian protest in Germany, the story said.

        iow, we didn’t report that’s what happened, we reported that’s what the nyt said happened, which is different. in fact the point of the story is that the nyt’s articles conflict w/eachother.

        i know the protest in frankfurt had 2000 people but the video the guy featured was a mach smaller protest w/only 200 people. a town i had never heard of.

        i know if the great many protests in germany over the summer and the nature of them because a lot of people sent me photos from germany for this post, http://mondoweiss.net/2014/07/worldwide-protest-israeli i couldn’t publish them all there were so many.

        but i think people have come to expect i sraeli apologists lie all the time and fabricate. remember this big lie http://mondoweiss.net/2014/07/synagogue-attributed-semitism ?

  17. German Lefty
    German Lefty on October 20, 2014, 6:35 pm

    OT: Moshe Zuckermann introduces his new book in Berlin (German-language videos):
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=nlWpXA2OnVk
    http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=O1MGBmSZ1xo

  18. Jonas
    Jonas on October 21, 2014, 4:14 am

    @Annie&mondoweiss
    Thanx a lot for your work! I´m sorry if I was hitting the wrong ones. I just wanted to clearify and expose an unproved accusation that is constantly repeated. Keep on the good work! Please!

  19. lysias
    lysias on October 22, 2014, 3:52 pm

    Here’s an article from The Jewish Daily Forward about an Israeli-style hummus restaurant in Berlin: Berlin’s Hummus Entrepreneurs:

    I soon discovered that Zula was just the tip of the chickpea. In fact, Berlin has become a hotbed of hummus entrepreneurship, with joints like Zula, Sababa and Djimalaya popping up in its most popular neighborhoods. Much of the Berlin hummus buzz is — unsurprisingly — connected to the mass immigration of Israelis to the city. The German capital has an estimated 20,000 Israeli-born residents, most of whom have arrived since the beginning of the decade.

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