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Gazans remember Rachel Corrie on the 13th anniversary of her death

Israel/Palestine
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On March 16, 2016, Ashley Malloy spoke via Skype to writers from We Are Not Numbers about drama, passion and how they have come together in the one-woman play, “My Name is Rachel Corrie.”

Ashley, who now is 23—the same age as Rachel when she was run over by an Israeli bulldozer while trying to prevent the demolition of a home in Rafah, Gaza—is currently touring the United States in the play, and I caught up with her just before her performance in Mt. Ranier, MD. This interview was shot by Maurice Jacobson, a mentor for We Are Not Numbers from Inshallah Media Productions, who currently is working to organize a multi-media exposition called “We All Live in Gaza,” planned for Washington, DC, on the second anniversary of the 2014 Israeli war on Gaza.

The writers in We Are Not Numbers range from 16 to 29 years old—all were very young at the time of Rachel’s murder, say this about how they came to know of her death, and their reaction to Ashley’s efforts to keep her memory alive:

Aya Nashwan, 19

Aya Nashwan

Aya Nashwan

“Actually, I only learned about Rachel through your post (my announcement about Ashley Malloy’s talk). It attracted me! I went directly to Google to search for more details about her and watched a video. Then I read her emails to her family while she was in Gaza, which were online.

“Hearing Ashley speak was a great chance to know more about Americans and how some really sympathize with our cause. Knowing that supports my dream to continue on my way, to convey more true facts about Palestinians. She motivates me and gives me hope that Americans can be with us, not always against us.”

Israa Suliman, 20

“I heard about Rachel just a few months ago, maybe five months, while studying Caryl Churchill’s play ‘Seven Jewish Children’ in university. There was a scene in the play talking about bulldozers and demolishing houses in Gaza. So we related this to Rachel and what happened to her.

“Hearing Ashley speak motivated me to proceed on my path of writing, since she reinforced that it is an effective way for our voices to reach the outside world, to let people know the hidden truth about the horrible Israeli crimes against the Palestinian people. Words and stories are the most moving way to express ourselves and to make change. So we are on the right path. I’m so excited!”

Besan Aljadili, 21

Besan Aljadil

Besan Aljadil

“I also knew about her from ‘Seven Jewish Children.’ We studied it at the university and we related what was written in the play to Rachel’s death.

“I had never thought there is an American who has such passion for defending the Palestinian cause. She is a source of inspiration who gives us hope that there are people thinking about us and feeling our pain. Drama is a brilliant way to open people’s eyes?”

Karama Fadel, 26

“I didn’t learn about Rachel until three years ago, when I heard about her from a few volunteers with the ISM (International Solidarity Movement, the same group to which Rachel belonged) in Gaza. I taught some of them Arabic.”

Mahmoud Khalaf, 20

“I learned about Rachel when the Italian activist Vittorio Arrigoni was killed in Gaza in 2010. People shared his photos and compared him to Rachel. So, I became enthusiastic about reading about her.”

Jehad Abu Jazar, 26

Jehad Abu Jazar

Jehad Abu Jazar

“Rachel rented a flat with other ISM members in my neighborhood, when I was about 13. I used to watch them taking photos. I didn’t know her personally, but we were all devastated when she was killed.”

Salsabeel Zeineddin, 22 

“Four years ago, when I was 19, I asked my uncle to give me a book in English to read, and the one he gave me was her book with her letters to her family. After that, I did more searching on Google about her. Her story inspired me to express myself more.

“And then I heard Ashley. She turned a light on inside me. She really fights for her perspectives. It is really inspiring that a girl who is just 23 years old stands for an issue and has this strong personality, raising up her voice like Rachel did.”

Baswan Derawi, 26

“I heard about Rachel several years ago, when the anniversary ofher death was in the news. I pray the world can see and understand what we have been through. Thank you, Rachel, and I am happy there are people like Ashley who follow your steps.”

Pam
About Pam Bailey

Pam Bailey is founder of WeAreNotNumbers.org and international secretary for the Euro-Mediterranean Human Rights Monitor. She is based in Washington, DC, and travels to the Middle East frequently.

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4 Responses

  1. kalithea
    kalithea
    March 16, 2016, 11:23 pm

    I’m so glad Rachel’s memory is inspiring young Palestinians to hold on to hope and realize that they are not alone in their struggle for justice. This is the perfect way to honor her short, courageous life.

    Rachel had a beautiful spirit that lives on.

    • El Cazador
      El Cazador
      March 17, 2016, 7:07 pm

      It’s a very sad story. I remember vividly seeing the video broadcasted immediately after her «murder» by being crushed by an Israeli bulldozer used to destroy Palestinian homes and villages, and whatever the zionists want what the Palestinians own destroyed: orchards, olive trees, you name it… Those D11 Caterpillar bulldozers are the biggest there are, and Caterpillar is one of the companies targeted as a main supporter of Israel. Of course, selling such costly bulldozers equipped with bullet-proof cabins is too lucrative for Caterpillar to stop its relation$ with I$rael… Therefore the BDS should apply litterally to all companies helping zionist Israelis go ahead with their genocide and apartheid project.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caterpillar_D11

  2. Citizen
    Citizen
    March 18, 2016, 1:31 pm

    I’ve never met personally any American who has ever heard the name Rachel Corrie. This includes my whole family. How about you? They have all heard of Ann Frank.

  3. crypticvalentin
    crypticvalentin
    March 20, 2016, 3:23 am

    for Rachel

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