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When the language of genocide offends us more than ghettoizing another people

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This is part of Marc H. Ellis’s “Exile and the Prophetic” feature for Mondoweiss. To read the entire series visit the archive page.

These last days have seen commentary after commentary about the platform placed before the Jewish community and the world by the Movement for Black Lives. The central controversy over the statement for the Jewish community has been Israel and the labeling of its behavior as genocidal. This, coupled with the statement’s linking of police violence in America with Israeli police training and the calling out of the US aid to Israel’s apartheid regime, has struck a controversial note with Jews in general and the Jewish establishments in America and Israel.

In general, the Jewish establishments have taken out their Jewish chalkboard and lectured African Americans on their place in society and global discourse. The accusation, with a long tradition, is that African Americans should stick with Black issues – as defined by the Jewish establishment. Progressive Jews, always closer to the Jewish establishment than they want to admit, have defended the statement by the Movement for Black Lives as a whole, while admonishing references to genocide and aid to Israel as too much but excusable. In their mind, Jews should listen to Blacks overall and let the Israel issue slide. After all, they’re fed up with the American Jewish establishment and Israel as well, at least to a certain extent. Jews of Conscience take defense of the Black Lives statement to another level. If aid to Israel, training of American police and genocide fit the bill, why not call out the Jewish establishments for what they are doing?

Largely unaddressed in this discussion, however, is what the Black Lives broadside means within the always fraught Black-Jewish dialogue. Since Blacks and Jews play on an unequal playing field with no prospect of equality in sight, and since taking on the Jewish establishment and Israel yields little or no positive political points on the American scene, why would the Black Lives Matter movement venture onto this terrain? Could it be that Black Lives Matter, on behalf of its own community, decided to slap the face of Jewish innocence by dramatically entering the hugely symbolic and crucially important aspect of the Jewish witness to the world?

Variations of the Black Power movement have been taking on American and Israeli Jewish establishments in this way for years. For the most part, these attacks have been beaten back through invocations of the Holocaust, Jews as at the forefront of the Civil Rights movement and Israel as a beacon of democracy in the Middle East. Yet times have changed. None of these invocations work well anymore or at all. The fallback position of Jewish defense against charges of dislocation, oppressing and ghettoizing the Palestinians has worn thin. Hardly anyone in the world accepts this defense, including increasing number of Jews.

The slap across the face of Jewish innocence stings. When the language of genocide offends us more than ghettoizing another people, Jews on all sides of the debate about the Jewish witness to the world have entered a realm where symbolism takes on a new power. This, coupled with the knowledge that the ghettoization of the Palestinians is permanent and thus the Jewish establishments in America and Israel will triumph, leaves Jews of Conscience little room to maneuver.

The Movement for Black Lives has placed Jews on notice that we have arrived at the end of ethical Jewish history. What can be done, if anything, at the end, is the almost impossible question before us.

Marc H. Ellis
About Marc H. Ellis

Marc H. Ellis is Professor of History and Jewish Studies and Director of the Center for the Study of the Global Prophetic. His latest book is Finding Our Voice: Embodying the Prophetic and Other Misadventures.

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39 Responses

  1. gamal
    gamal
    August 9, 2016, 12:18 pm

    ” Could it be that Black Lives Matter, on behalf of its own community, decided to slap the face of Jewish innocence by dramatically entering the hugely symbolic and crucially important aspect of the Jewish witness to the world?”

    could it be that you are not the center of the universe

    “Variations of the Black Power movement have been taking on American and Israeli Jewish establishments in this way for years. For the most part, these attacks have been beaten back through invocations of the Holocaust, Jews as at the forefront of the Civil Rights movement and Israel as a beacon of democracy in the Middle East”

    and vociferous denunciations of Black antisemitism, why leave that out

    “The fallback position of Jewish defense against charges of dislocation, oppressing and ghettoizing the Palestinians has worn thin”

    it was always threadbare

    “The slap across the face of Jewish innocence stings.”

    “Jewish innocence” more properly racist obliviousness

    “When the language of genocide offends us more than ghettoizing another people”

    who likes being roused roughly from a profound slumber

    “The Movement for Black Lives has placed Jews on notice that we have arrived at the end of ethical Jewish history. What can be done, if anything, at the end, is the almost impossible question before us.”

    right go back to sleep,

    i see the “prophetic” is excitingly solipsistic,

    no wonder so many Jews turn to Buddhism, which doesn’t pretend to innocence or some vacuous “moral” mission.

    “What can be done, if anything, at the end, is the almost impossible question before us.”

    you know Marc one day Tsong Rinpoche was walking on Pig Alley in Kathmandu being berated by an irate American denouncing him for sitting up on high expensive thrones while we prostrated to him, Rinpoche a little grizzled old man listened quietly to the increasingly incensed American,

    Pig Alley is a slaughter house the gutters run with a mixture of blood, shit and filth, Lama’s often go about with skull cups hidden in the folds of their robes, they hold, being a human cranium about a litre,

    Rinpoche stooped down and filled his cup to the brim with this revolting black scummy fluid, the American stepped back in disgust as Rinpoche drank the whole lot down in one

    and smiling said “but i’m not proud”, you should try it, being free of self regard is real freedom and its very good for Jews, it makes you interesting, you will definitely have more sex and lose weight, you want abs?

    Islam. Judaism and Christianity have no mission other than to help beings we owe them nothing, Priests, Alim and Rabbi’s have together raped religion over many centuries you all seem united by your miraculous ability to court irrelevance at best or depravity more consistently, you and all the other “divines’ are more responsible for the growth of pitiless fundamentalisms within the Middle Eastern origin faiths than any other single factor, i am genuinely surprised when any of you have the gall to speak this hopeless confusion, its time you represent or hold your peace.

    • Mooser
      Mooser
      August 9, 2016, 1:25 pm

      Enjoyed your comment muchly,”Gamal”!
      Me, I just tell myself: “The balebatisheh yiden are a closed book to me,” and move on.

    • Sibiriak
      Sibiriak
      August 9, 2016, 5:17 pm

      Gamal on fire!

    • oldgeezer
      oldgeezer
      August 9, 2016, 6:39 pm

      Well said gamal.

    • RoHa
      RoHa
      August 10, 2016, 12:24 am

      “could it be that you are not the center of the universe”

      Anti-Semitic idea, Gamal.

    • Froggy
      Froggy
      August 10, 2016, 7:03 am

      That is brilliant, Gamal. Brilliant.

    • Stephen Shenfield
      Stephen Shenfield
      August 10, 2016, 10:00 am

      So the clerics (collective term for priests, alim, rabbis etc.) “raped religion”? Meaning that religion in its original form was good but the clerics messed it up? How likely is that? One of the clerics’ jobs is to interpret holy writ, so taken as a whole would you expect their interpretations to be so awful if the texts they are interpreting are so wonderful? Anyway, quite a lot of holy writ was the work of clerics, e.g. Judaic temple priests. Of course you can ignore the interpreters and try to return to the source. That is the basic idea behind what is called ‘fundamentalism’ — but you don’t want “pitiless fundamentalism,” you’d sooner have compassionate fundamentalism. Well, so would I, but the possibility of such a thing depends on how much compassion there is in the source. Are prophets and messiahs more compassionate than clerics?

      • eljay
        eljay
        August 10, 2016, 10:56 am

        || Stephen Shenfield: So the clerics (collective term for priests, alim, rabbis etc.) “raped religion”? Meaning that religion in its original form was good but the clerics messed it up? How likely is that? One of the clerics’ jobs is to interpret holy writ, so taken as a whole would you expect their interpretations to be so awful if the texts they are interpreting are so wonderful? … ||

        I’ve never understood the need for anyone to have to interpret any of “god’s” words. How could a benevolent and omnipotent being issue proclamations that are anything other than perfectly clear, comprehensible and unambiguous to every person who reads them or hears them read?

      • gamal
        gamal
        August 10, 2016, 7:31 pm

        “Meaning that religion in its original form was good but the clerics messed it up?”

        not at all, what is its original form? ( my “it” is without form)

        “One of the clerics’ jobs is to interpret holy writ”

        you don’t say how can i have missed that, i can see i am going to get a damn good spanking.

        “so taken as a whole would you expect their interpretations to be so awful if the texts they are interpreting are so wonderful? ”

        do you ever get the feeling that if you have 4 apples that you can eat the four and leave the apples.

        give me your text and i will make it wonderful for you, by the power of nothing,

        “Anyway, quite a lot of holy writ was the work of clerics, e.g. Judaic temple priests.”

        perhaps but I mean the good stuff, you slipped in holy writ, what is that?

        “Of course you can ignore the interpreters and try to return to the source.”

        again not the ones i like, why would i ignore them? they are shit hot.

        ‘and try to return to the source’ try? its in your pocket, try not returning to it, you have never been separate from it, it wouldn’t be interesting if it needed looking for, you have time for that,

        “That is the basic idea behind what is called ‘fundamentalism’ ”

        things look bad for me there’s no denying it

        “but you don’t want “pitiless fundamentalism,” you’d sooner have compassionate fundamentalism.”

        is that wrong of me? i like compassion like chips with everything, i have no proof.

        “Well, so would I,”

        shit Stephen you have got me all excited, is something going to happen, eventually

        “but the possibility of such a thing depends on how much compassion there is in the source”

        you know man i see that shit everywhere in everything, including in this my much deserved takedown, i am so rooting for you.

        “how much compassion there is in the source” no compassion is the interpreter where it belongs ( this not an error get Roha to tell you about Dogen and language, i am too ignorant), “the source”, Stephen you are so clinical i know what is in store for me.

        “Are prophets and messiahs” are you imputing ludicrous beliefs to me just because i am irrational and crazed, that’s not fair, i have ignored prophets and messiahs what are they? and who cares?

        messiah is not a religious notion, its fucking sick, like saviour

        prophets again no for me no thanks you have as many you like though, and spare me..even though i richly deserve the refutation that you are going to get to

        “Are prophets and messiahs more compassionate than clerics?”

        i think they all made each other up, seriously Stephen i would like to concede the argument and humbly accept that I am wrong and that you are Sir the finest intellect to grind my blunt little mind in to the dust. (not sarcasm)

        “Take defeat upon yourself

        Give victory to others”

        (not a prophet not holy writ not gods law, a professor just suggests it and some other things)

        oh come its a little bit sweet isn’t it,

        and now i can’t be sarcastic because demons will shove molten brass rods up me if i am,

        i am unencumbered with beliefs Stephen, do you find them useful?

        its big world out there you can’t grasp it reductively or at all, you don’t need to its all yours anyway, sitting there unnoticed in the palm of your hand, the most wonderful thing (not a thing, not sitting not in the hand, not wonderful)

        as to me you have dispatched me logically if not compassionately ( fuck it i can take a bit of molten brass roding because

        “i cum frum Pudsey where birds fly back’ards to keep muck outa there eyes” allegorically.

        because i do not see any of us even me as problem that has to be solved, and if there is going to any solving it won’t be by me as you have so ably demonstrated.

      • gamal
        gamal
        August 10, 2016, 8:07 pm

        might i recommend

        Spiritual Materialism (old but a classic)

        by

        Chogyam Trungpa

        also

        (“heart of the buddha” on the abidharma and he does the lojong slogans well worth a casual perusal)

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 10, 2016, 8:42 pm

        You are assuming that God is benevolent and omnipotent. But perhaps he isn’t quite as high-powered as he makes out, and didn’t pay attention to Miss Hardman’s strictures. As a result, he ends up giving vague utterances in shifty foreign tongues. If he wrote much, he’d probably get the commas wrong.

        This is one of the points that Theodore Drange considered in Nonbelief and Evil.

        https://www.amazon.com/Nonbelief-Evil-Two-Arguments-Nonexistence/dp/1573922285

        (See also the brilliant, scintillating and insightful review in Philosophical Inquiry , Vol. XXII, Winter-Spring 2000. Modesty prevents me from naming the reviewer.)

      • silamcuz
        silamcuz
        August 11, 2016, 1:41 am

        Gamal,

        Islamic clerics and Imams have contributed immensely to humanity throughout history. Please educate yourself on religious figures like Imam al Ghazali, Ibn Khaldun, Malik ibn Anas, Al-Shafi‘i, Rumi, Ibn Battuta, Ibn Sina, and countless others.

        One could even say that these people laid the foundation of the liberal humanistic philosophy that underlies modern Western societies.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 11, 2016, 7:45 am

        Yes, Gamal, it’s about time you learned a bit about Islamic culture. I’m sure you’ve never heard of any of those guys. I hope simalcuz doesn’t look through your past comments. Your ignorance has been a constant embarrassment to us all.

        You really should learn a bit of Arabic as well, but I suppose that’s too much to ask.

        What sort of name is “Gamal”, anyway?

      • eljay
        eljay
        August 11, 2016, 8:01 am

        || RoHa: You are assuming that God is benevolent and omnipotent. … ||

        I don’t assume (because it makes an ass out of u and me) that “god” is benevolent and omnipotent – I’ve been told by none other than gawd hisself that s/he is benevolent and omnipotent. Surely they wouldn’t lie about such a thing…would it?

      • gamal
        gamal
        August 11, 2016, 8:11 am

        “One could even say that these people laid the foundation of the liberal humanistic philosophy that underlies modern Western societies.”

        yes as you’ve demonstrated you can say that, now what?

        you are saying liberal humanistic philosophy underlies modern Western societies its that that makes them so murderous and avaricious, though no one can deny their “exceptionalism”,

        yeah Islam done good.

      • gamal
        gamal
        August 11, 2016, 9:15 am

        “Modesty prevents me from naming the reviewer”

        Modesty is an especially vengeful deity, i have seen white people blush red when they violate Her dictates, which is apparently very painful for them.

        unfortunately the Dao that you can define is not the Dao, and yet “we saw you from day one with a Bible in one hand and guns in the other one” from day one mind you

        Modesty commands you dance to this and blush because ” now everything has changed”

        Mandatious

        https://youtu.be/e0W3UJpELmo

      • silamcuz
        silamcuz
        August 12, 2016, 4:36 am

        you are saying liberal humanistic philosophy underlies modern Western societies its that that makes them so murderous and avaricious, though no one can deny their “exceptionalism”,

        yeah Islam done good

        Whilst I agree with you that most if not all Western societies are deeply hypocritical with regards to their way of life and the values they espouse, I still think Islamic intellectuals such as clerics and Imams paved the way for European philosophical renaissance.

        It was through the works of these Imams and clerics that Europe managed to crawl out of their dark ages. However, since they didn’t absorb any of the teachings into their heart, they are still corrupt within despite the superficial development they have achieved since the Renaissance.

        You said clerics and Imams messed up the religion, but who are you to say that? Many influential Muslims and non-Muslims revere these figures for the contributions they made not just to Muslims and Islamic society, but to humanity as a whole. This is why the works of Rumi, Ibn Sina. Omar Khayyam, Razi, Al-Maliki et all are still being studied and appreciated throughout the world by people of all faith and political leanings. Modern Western legal system IMO has a lot to learn from the philosophy and practicality of the jurisprudence developed by these Imams and clerics.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 12, 2016, 10:13 am

        “You said clerics and Imams messed up the religion, but who are you to say that? ”

        Someone who is very well equipped to make such judgments.

        If you took the trouble to go to Gamal’s profile and read what remains of the archive of his comments, you would see that he has a deep and detailed knowledge of Islamic theology and the history of Islamic thought.

      • RoHa
        RoHa
        August 12, 2016, 10:15 am

        Eljay,

        Of course not lie, but be mistaken.

      • eljay
        eljay
        August 12, 2016, 11:36 am

        || RoHa: Eljay,

        Of course not lie, but be mistaken. ||

        Aha! God can’t be mistaken because god said god is perfect.

        “Oh, intercourse the penguin!”

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        August 12, 2016, 2:15 pm

        “you would see that he has a deep and detailed knowledge of Islamic theology and the history of Islamic thought.”

        And is a really cool guy, too. He’s a soul person.

      • gamal
        gamal
        August 12, 2016, 6:34 pm

        “Someone who is very well equipped to make such judgments.”

        Roha you are so kind ( I will do my best I swear with the grammar punctuation, i will fuck up so badly, shit i don’t need a safe place)

        really from my heart because you touched me Roha, this is how religion happened for me, daddy was a sheikh so one day he was teaching these hausa dudes in the garage where they had shade, i was 5 it was my habit to run around naked, it was hot,

        i could see that class was finished my father motioned me over, i ran up in to the cool of the concrete garage naked and sat down between my fathers legs

        have you ever been in the heat when they pen a herd of cows and its hot and they make a series of low shuffling noises, not rhythmic but constant,

        well the arfrican dudes shuffled about there were 10 or so guys my father leaned down to me and said they will sing you will like it, how good is your hausa?

        for a long time they just relaxed shuffled its not a performance, the first voice that leads here said of me laughing at my Scholar father “we killed the boy, give him a drum” laughter etc this is if you are now, here it this is “it”, the good “it”,

        to accomplish the spiritual path there is nothing more important than other beings, you know people and animals that you know, insects, don’t start, that’s it care for them like women do with young babies they don’t mean that shit they do to you,

        but as i was taught from young sarkin muri, real religion benefits everything touches effortlessly hear them a real thing with the sacred like they have in Judaism and with the enlightenment, that thing, that kind and gentle thing there

        https://youtu.be/IpnPk-XUXyg

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        August 12, 2016, 7:04 pm

        “Aha! God can’t be mistaken because god said god is perfect.”

        See that’s the problem with God.
        Me, I think a little Divine modesty (“Creating the world in six days? Oh that, it was nothing, really. Any decent God could do it, and many have.”) wouldn’t be out of place. But do you want to be the one to tell Him this? “Hey God, you’re a conceited prig, you know that?” Better be well-grounded.

    • otc
      otc
      August 14, 2016, 9:31 am

      Gamal
      enjoyed reading your comments – an effective critique done in a creative way. Frankly I find Marc Ellis’ writing hard to follow – often don’t know what he’s talking about. “Exile and the Prophetic”? Does that mean anything?

      I get the point of your story about Tsong Rinpoche, but something keeps gnawing.
      Does drinking some slimy shit necessarily demonstrate lack of pride?
      Another interpretation is that drinking slimy shit was the price
      he thought he needed to pay to keep his expensive thrones and compliant prostrating devotees – and they went for it.
      Now if he had sold the thrones and taken a part time job on Pig Alley.. should he have done that?

  2. Marnie
    Marnie
    August 9, 2016, 12:27 pm

    Mr Pesner and posse –

    You don’t like the wording. That’s your problem. No one asked for your permission to use it. It isn’t your word. It’s used to describe a situation you that continue to choose to ignore. Maybe prayer will help you realize the error in your ways?

    You have no problem with the state of affairs in Palestine? That’s a problem. If you don’t want to support MBL or BLM fine. Just get the fuck out of the way. They don’t want or need you.

    On a different note, all this drama about the proper use of the word genocide reminds me of something. That young woman from the Sander’s campaign, Simone Zimmerman, who was sought because she was young, relevant and pulled no punches. Funny, as soon as she told it like it was, she was silenced and so ridiculously, the crap about her ‘foul’ language, as if her words were too offensive for the delicate sensitivities of zionists, who have no problem with ‘mowing the lawn’ and ‘putting the Palestinians on a diet’. HYPOCRITES. Bernie was never going to stand up for Palestine, he just needed a convenient way to get out of his false commitment.

  3. Mr.T
    Mr.T
    August 9, 2016, 12:57 pm

    Rabbi Jonah Dov Pesner, Director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, who responded to the Black Lives Matter platform by saying, “Anti-Israel rhetoric like that found in the Movement for Black Lives policy platform is especially troubling because it falsely suggests American Jews – both of color and white – must choose between their commitment to combatting racism in the United States and their Zionism.”

    It doesn’t say you must choose, Mr. Pesner. What it says is that if you profess to be against racism in the US, but favor the racist ideology of Zionism in Palestine, don’t expect people to be “polite” and ignore the clear and utter hypocrisy in your position. Simply put, Mr. Pesner, if you favor Zionism, you favor racism (or an ethno-religious bigotry that is racism’s absolute equivalent). Pure and simple. Zionism = Racism.

    • Mary T
      Mary T
      August 9, 2016, 3:12 pm

      Exactly right, Mr. T.

    • joemowrey
      joemowrey
      August 9, 2016, 4:16 pm

      Yes, exactly right.

      “…it falsely suggests American Jews – both of color and white – must choose between their commitment to combatting racism in the United States and their Zionism.”

      Statements like this read like something out of bizarro world. Talk about cognitive disconnect.

      • annie
        annie
        August 9, 2016, 4:36 pm

        definitely an oxymoron. note how it doesn’t read “commitment to combatting racism and their Zionism.”

        because clearly they are not committed to combatting racism in israel or else they wouldn’t be zionists.

    • Froggy
      Froggy
      August 9, 2016, 7:35 pm

      Quite so.

  4. Mooser
    Mooser
    August 9, 2016, 1:15 pm

    “… and since taking on the Jewish establishment and Israel yields little or no positive political points on the American scene,”

    Oh, it didn’t used to, anyway. And people used to be charmed by the South.

    • Citizen
      Citizen
      August 9, 2016, 1:57 pm

      Well put.

      • Mooser
        Mooser
        August 9, 2016, 2:52 pm

        “Well put.”

        I never thought Jewish would be the new orange forever.

  5. MHughes976
    MHughes976
    August 9, 2016, 3:58 pm

    The ‘invocations’ – incantations, spells – used to beat back radicals who speak harshly of Israel have not lost their dark magical power as much as Marc might suppose. I looked the other day at what is happening to Joy Karega at Oberlin and had the impression that she is paying for her temerity with her career amid proclamations that anti-Semitism at Oberlin is at last being addressed. I wholly don’t share her false flag theories but I do think that it’s a free speech issue and do think that equally weird theories where Israel was not involved would not attract the same penalties or ‘invocations’.

  6. pabelmont
    pabelmont
    August 9, 2016, 9:00 pm

    I’ve seen the BLM “genocide” paragraph quoted but it seems to have disappeared from the BLM statement of principles [ https://policy.m4bl.org/platform/ ] (unless I looked in the wrong place). If it has already been removed, then that would appear to be the proof that the same steamroller that flattened Bernie also flattened BLM/genocide.

    • annie
      annie
      August 9, 2016, 9:21 pm

      pabelmont, i responded to your earlier query on another thread : http://mondoweiss.net/2016/08/organizations-demonstrates-communitys/#comment-850472

      again: the first link goes to the platform’s cover page. there is a dropdown up on top that says “platform” and from there go to “invest-divest” : https://policy.m4bl.org/invest-divest/

      there are 3 references to genocide. the relevant one is

      The US justifies and advances the global war on terror via its alliance with Israel and is complicit in the genocide taking place against the Palestinian people. The US requires Israel to use 75 percent of all the military aid it receives to buy US-made arms. Consequently, every year billions of dollars are funneled from US taxpayers to hundreds of arms corporations, who then wage lobbying campaigns pushing for even more foreign military aid. The results of this policy are twofold: it not only diverts much needed funding from domestic education and social programs, but it makes US citizens complicit in the abuses committed by the Israeli government. Israel is an apartheid state with over 50 laws on the books that sanction discrimination against the Palestinian people. Palestinian homes and land are routinely bulldozed to make way for illegal Israeli settlements. Israeli soldiers also regularly arrest and detain Palestinians as young as 4 years old without due process. Everyday, Palestinians are forced to walk through military checkpoints along the US-funded apartheid wall.

      the other 2 are in this paragraph:

      Somalia has not only experienced extended military intervention as a result of AFRICOM but has been treated as an experimentation site for the U.S. devastating drone policy. The Democratic Republic of Congo as a region has had a long history of U.S. intervention that have coincided with some of the worst genocides in the world. Not only have U.S. backed African intervention armies committed atrocities but U.S. private companies extract the worlds wealth from Congolese soil. And as is true here, women and the most vulnerable in our communities pay the price of U.S. intervention and the accompanying genocides and civil wars. The U.S. must make room for African-led development and peace-making that is led by grassroots decision-making of the most marginalized and directly affected. We insist on African leaders and demand resources be made to begin the process of community-building at home.

      • pabelmont
        pabelmont
        August 10, 2016, 11:19 am

        Thanks, Annie.

  7. Elizabeth Block
    Elizabeth Block
    August 10, 2016, 10:00 am

    The police in Ferguson were Israeli-trained. So are a lot of other police forces, most notably New York City’s. And no doubt they are trained there to treat citizens as the enemy.
    That being so, I don’t think Israel and Zionism are irrelevant to Black Lives Matter.

  8. Elizabeth Block
    Elizabeth Block
    August 10, 2016, 10:02 am

    Then there is the phenomenon of people criticizing the word used to describe the thing and ignoring the thing itself.
    Me, I follow Ruth Godfrey, of the Israeli Committee Against Home Demolitions and a daughter of holocaust survivors, whom I heard in Jerusalem say that she doesn’t use the word “genocide” to describe what’s happening now. Why not? She’s waiting for when it actually starts. Yes, that’s what she said.

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