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“A Watershed Moment in Palestinian History”: Interview with Jamal Juma’

Israel/Palestine
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For weeks now, Palestinians everywhere have been galvanized by events taking place in the Gaza Strip, the site of weekly (since March 30) mass protests demanding the end of the siege and blockade of Gaza (in place now since 2007) and the right to return to the homes from which they or their elders had been kicked out. Dubbed the Great March of Return, Gazans have assembled as close as they can to the Israeli-designated buffer zone separating Gaza from Israel. Israeli soldiers at a distance, crouched behind earth barriers that they created in the days preceding the march, and at absolutely no danger of attack from the unarmed protestors, pick off demonstrators at their leisure. By June 14, at least 129 Palestinians had been killed and 13,000 injured; the dead included medics like the 21-year-old Razan al-Najjar and journalists including Yaser Murtaja—typically seen as off-limits in conflict zones but transformed by Israel into prime targets.

On June 4, I spoke to Jamal Juma’, coordinator of the Palestinian Grassroots Anti-Apartheid Wall Campaign, about the popular resistance in Gaza, the Trump administration’s policy toward the question of Palestine, and Palestinian options to chart a new course.

Ida Audeh: I interviewed you in August 2011 to learn more about the separation wall and its effect on communities in its path. Describe Israel’s current system of control over the occupied territories, of which the wall is a part.

Jamal Juma’: It is clear that the wall was designed to isolate and lay siege to Palestinians. The project to place Palestinians under siege by means of the wall has been completed. It closed off all the dynamic areas that Israel considered necessary to isolate various areas. Eighty percent of the Wall is within the West Bank. The second part of the siege is reinforcement of the settlements. Each settlement has what Israel calls a buffer zone – a security apparatus consisting of barbed wire and roads that Palestinians are not allowed to use. This, together with the alternative (bypass) roads (which we call the apartheid roads), allows them to control the territory. Today there are two road networks: one is for Israeli settlers, about 1,400 km long, and its purpose is to connect all settlements to one another and to Israel in a kind of network. And this is complete. This network is the dominant one in the West bank, and it includes the major roads. The other network, the alternative roads, is for Palestinians to use; these roads will intersect through 48 planned tunnels and bridges, some of which have been created already. The two road systems are separate. This is the basis of the racist discriminatory system we talk about: isolating Palestinians and confining them in limited spaces, control of their resources through settlements, the road network, and military installations, and the wall, which take up about 62% of the area of the West Bank.

With the extension of the settlements, we no longer just talk about Palestinians being ghettoized in the north, south, and central region. There is more fragmentation of Palestinian residential areas. New settlement outposts are not being discussed in terms of whether they should be removed or not.  They are being transformed into settlements. When you see 150 outposts, you are really talking about 150 new settlements. This project is being intensified, and especially since Trump took office.

IA: So you noticed a clear acceleration after Trump?

JJ: It’s much more than an acceleration. This is a watershed moment in Palestinian history. Since Trump took office, US policy fully adopted the Zionist project and embarked on a process of liquidating the Palestinian cause, of eliminating it. It is clear program. This began with Jerusalem and the recognition of Jerusalem as the capital of the Zionist entity, the transfer of the embassy, targeting the refugees by cutting financing of UNRWA, and other forms of pressure on areas that host large numbers of refugees including getting them settled permanently in the host countries.

Israeli colonization, the geographic engineering of the political map, is another component in the liquidation of the Palestinian cause. Israeli proposals for colonization are massive. They are concentrating on the Jordan Valley – creating new settlements, expanding existing settlements, creating the supportive infrastructure, and huge incentives are given to Israelis who work in agriculture (including cash payments of $20,000 for anyone willing to move there). Now the settlements are on the tops of the mountain chain that overlook the Jordan Valley, which enable them to encircle lower lying towns. When you talk about Ariel, Ma’ale Adumim, and so on, it will be as though the entire West Bank is a suburb of Tel Aviv. This will make it impossible for there to be any separation in the future, for there to be any independent Palestinian entity; instead, an apartheid system of cantons will be imposed on Palestinians.  This is the reality on the ground.

Back to the new US policy: In addition to a shift in standing US positions on Jerusalem and the refugee issue, there is the use of Arab countries that are ready for normalization with Israel and eager to be aligned with the American project – first and foremost, Saudi Arabia, and also Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates, and Egypt, which are pressuring the Palestinians to accept the US project to liquidate the Palestinian cause. This has complicated things and taken it out of the sphere of international law and the UN; everyone had previously worked within that framework. We have been demanding the implementation of resolutions. But the US dealt a blow to international law.

IA: The US now proposes the “deal of the century,” which Gulf states are eagerly endorsing. Can you describe the contours of that deal?

JJ: The proposal is to create a Palestinian state in Gaza with extensions into the Sinai Desert, to be administered by the Palestinian Authority. The West Bank and Jerusalem are not part of these calculations, although Israel might be willing to give up some areas around Jerusalem that are densely populated with Palestinians. (This part of the proposal has been floated by extremist Israeli groups even before the Trump proposal.) They might be willing to remove from Greater Jerusalem areas with high Palestinian density, like Jabal Mukkaber, Isawiya, Silwan, and Sur Bahir; there has been some discussion about removing Beit Hanina and Shufat. The Israelis would retain control of the Jewish settlements and the Old City, which together make up about 87% of the area of East Jerusalem—not exactly a small territory.

IA: What is the Palestinian response to these plans?

JJ:  On the formal political level, the PA is in a crisis. It placed its faith in the US, but now US determination to liquidate the Palestinian cause is very clear.  The only real option remaining to the PA is to cast its lot with the Palestinian people and on free people around the world, international solidarity and movements that support us. The Palestinian people have to make a decision, and so does the PA.

On the popular level, we see serious activity in search of an alternative to the status quo, the largest and the most important of which is taking place now in Gaza with the Great March of Return. These actions are important for a number of reasons. They changed the stereotypes about Gaza as a launchpad for rockets, a place of terrorism that has been hijacked by Hamas. In fact, the marches in Gaza since March 30 represent a widespread popular movement, massive popular resistance. Just like the first intifada emerged from Jabaliya in the Gaza Strip, today we have the beginnings of a mass civil disobedience movement. Gaza has a population that is resisting, and Hamas does not control this resistance. The discourse we generally hear, that Hamas is leading people to their death, should be recognized as racist and dehumanizing. People are not robots. Gazans of all ages, family situations, and economic and educational levels are taking part in these marches to raise their cause to the world.  These people are saying that the siege of Gaza cannot continue. We are human beings, we have rights, and one of those rights is to live like human beings. Gaza is no longer inhabitable. Gaza has been turned into a prison and a hell. Even the UN acknowledges that. The numbers around Gaza are just astounding.

The Great March has returned focus on the refugee issue and put it squarely on the table despite all the efforts to ignore and erase it. More than 70% of Gaza residents are refugees, and they are demanding the right to return to their original hometowns.

For that reason, the marches in Gaza are very important in defining the trajectory of the Palestinian question and restoring the role of popular resistance to the forefront. They lay the popular foundation for the coming phase. They might also have prevented another massive disaster. I think Israel was preparing to implement the Trump administration’s proposals; the scenario that the Israelis were planning for was to pull Gaza into a military confrontation, which would justify more intense bombing than it has done in the past. The borders with Egypt would open, and people would flee into Egypt. But the mass participation in the march thwarted that plan.

IA: I find it hard to understand how Ramallah can be so tranquil considering the carnage in Gaza.

JJ:  It might seem that what is happening in the West Bank is not at all comparable to what is happening in Gaza. And that is true, it isn’t as massive. But actions are taking place in the West Bank, and they are also important. On a weekly basis people are gathering to protest at the checkpoints. Since 2011 there have been continuous outbursts (in Arabic, habbat); for example, in Jerusalem in the Bab al-Shams encampment and in the aftermath of the Abu Khdeir and Dawabshe killings (January 2013, July 2014, and July 2015, respectively).* These outbursts were significant and exemplary, the way Gaza is today. They reminded us of what the Palestinian people are capable of doing. I expect that these outbursts here and there will lead to widespread civil disobedience. Young people in Jerusalem and the West Bank have been going out to checkpoints in the hundreds, on a daily basis, and these conditions put one in the mindset of the first intifada.

We should take note of what Palestinians in Israel are doing as well. There are youth movements that are taking action in ways that are very impressive and a source of pride.  They defy the occupation and they involve large numbers of people, in Haifa and elsewhere.

IA: Let’s look at the relationship of Palestinians to formal political bodies. Recently the Palestinian National Council held its first meeting in 22 years. One might have thought that over the course of more than two decades, several issues and events warranted a meeting – regional events, the assassination of Yasir Arafat, and the status of the Oslo accords come to mind. But the convening of the PNC doesn’t seem to have generated much popular interest.

JJ: People did not pay much attention to it, but in fact they should be talking about it because it poses a threat. Meeting for the first time in 22 years, it did not even discuss what it has done since the last meeting! What it did do is effectively cancel itself, which means it is changing the structure of the PLO. There is an attempt to replace the Central Committee with a body consisting of the private sector, the political currents in the PA today, and elements of the security apparatus. No representation of Palestinians from the 1948 areas, or the diaspora, or even the Palestinian street. This is a threat to the Palestinian project.

The PLO as it has been transformed by Mahmoud Abbas threatens the national cause. It has been hijacked; our task is to restore it as a representative and unifying entity that works to support the Palestinian cause. The reform should be led by Palestinian groups and movements.

People have no confidence in the leadership; they don’t think it is capable of leading in the coming phase.  In fact, the outbursts I referred to earlier had the potential of triggering a third intifada. People were waiting for a leadership to emerge, as happened during the first intifada; three months into the intifada, a unified leadership emerged and took charge. But this time, the PA wasn’t interested in assuming that role; three months into these protests, the PA sent its people to disrupt actions and prevent young people from gathering at checkpoints. The national factions were unable to form a unified leadership for obvious reasons.

IA: What is the alternative?

JJ: People have to create a national movement that can lead the change. What will lead the movement for change will not be a single individual. It will be a widespread national movement that has a real relationship with people on the ground, a movement that will direct the street. This is the only way change will take place. People have been waiting for a long time, but who are we waiting for? There is not going to be a great charismatic leader. We don’t talk about a heroic leader, we talk about a heroic people and a leadership of institutions.

We want a Palestinian state that represents all Palestinians. Within that broad outline, we say that right now, we have to protect the Palestinian project – the right to self-determination, and we all struggle for that right. We don’t have to get into a discussion about the final outcome. The time for the two state solution is clearly over—and in fact, that proposal provided the basis for trying to destroy our cause. The other option is clear. But like I said, we don’t want that discussion to detract from our focus now or to place us in conflict with the position of the PLO.

How do we support the Palestinian project? We have to confront what is happening in Jerusalem, the settlements. There has to be a practical program, not just slogans on paper. Palestinians in the diaspora should support these activities, get involved in the boycott movement, because we are part of that boycott movement. We are trying to keep the political work and the boycott movement separate to protect the boycott movement, because there is a Palestinian effort underway to weaken the BDS movement; through normalization, by invoking the PLO position. We consider the boycott movement an essential component of our activism.

This is what people are discussing today, here and with our people in the 1948 areas, and in the diaspora. Many meetings have taken place, and they are being expanded. I expect that in the next few weeks there will be a meeting to put in writing some of the agreed upon principles underlying all of these actions. There has to be a movement that preserves the unity of the Palestinian people and protects the national cause from liquidation. That’s what we are working on now.

Notes

* The 2013 encampment known as Bab al-Shams was an attempt by Palestinians to thwart Israeli plans to establish a settlement on land in the E1 zone, between East Jerusalem and the Jewish-only settlement Ma’ale Adumim; the Israeli plan was designed to permanently sever the West Bank from East Jerusalem. Another encampment, Bab al-Karama, was set up in Beit Iksa and stormed by Israeli soldiers two days later. In July 2014, Israeli settlers in Jerusalem abducted 16-year-old Mohammad Abu Khdeir from Shufat and set him on fire; the ensuing demonstrations resulted in 160 Palestinians injured. Israel’s assault on Gaza began five days later. One year later, settlers set fire to the Dawabshe home in Duma. The soul survivor of the attack was a 4-year-old child; the child’s parents and infant brother were killed. In 2015, a tent encampment, “Gate of Jerusalem,” was set up in Abu Dis to protest the Israeli government’s plans to displace Bedouin communities there. Beginning in September 2015 and lasting until the end of the year, protests spread from the al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem throughout the West Bank; 108 Palestinians were killed and 12,260 were injured.  Palestinians in Israel demonstrated in solidarity.

About Ida Audeh

Ida Audeh is a Palestinian from the West Bank who lives in Colorado. She is the editor of Birzeit University: The Story of a National Institution, published by Birzeit University in 2010.

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41 Responses

  1. Sibiriak
    June 29, 2018, 10:36 am

    Excellent article. Laser-sharp analysis of recent developments.

  2. DaBakr
    June 29, 2018, 11:07 am

    Palestinians continue to reach watershed moments in the past as well. The main problem with this is that israel keeps chugging along. It deals with a growing BDS issue while conducting complex FP with Euro, Russia and other powers not traditionally aligned with IDF. Security in the north, collaboration in the east and constant upgrades to machines being tweaked to destroy the Hamas ploy of flaming rubbers, balloons etc.

    • Annie Robbins
      June 29, 2018, 11:55 am

      as the genocidal noose is drawn tighter and tighter choking the life out of palestine israel keeps chugging along.

      • Mooser
        June 29, 2018, 1:42 pm

        “Annie”, remember the big advantage Zionists have in this discussion: It doesn’t matter what they say, or how they say it, only that they say something.
        If what they say is wrong or reprehensible, that makes it even better, it impresses us with their power and implacable beliefs.

        That’s a big advantage in debate. Just ask “DaBakr”!

      • DaBakr
        June 30, 2018, 12:27 am

        @an

        there is no genocide. the palestinians continue to thrive in not only most of judea and samaria but in far flung nations around the globe. the gazans are trapped between a rock and hard place. They support Hamas in general (or at least in public) but it is the Hamas that is acting as a genocidal tyrannical “noose….drawn tighter and chocking the life out of…” Gaza.
        And even if you do actually believe there is a ‘genocide’ (by what definition i am certain you have ready by your keyboard) there is always the option of negotiating a peace. in the case of the first nations in north america who were definitely the victims of the first modern genocide it wasn’t as if they were given a choice to negotiate and survive. they did negotiate many treaties that were broken and they barely survived after that. the jews in ww2 were no given any choice as to wether they could avoid boxcars to killing factories. yet -a cliche it may be but it still stands-if the Hamas were to lay down their arms and their covenent sworn to destroy the ‘zionist entity’ there would be peace the next day. (i don’t have to repeat the 2nd part of the cliche either.)
        there is in actuality-a stand off between a tenacious people that believe their cause will prevail against another tenacious people who have built a nation on their ancient homeland that includes the full civil rights of muslims, christians and other religions , races and sexual orientation. all the claims of colour ‘washing’ can’t erase the fact that this is how things are in an imperfect but thriving israel today.

      • Annie Robbins
        June 30, 2018, 1:02 am

        the palestinians continue to thrive

        i’d urge you to seek out the definition of “thrive”. because i can assure you palestinian development in the region of palestine is neither “well, vigorous, prospering or flourishing”.

        there is always the option of negotiating a peace

        only if one perceive peace as total surrender. have you been following the news? https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/palestine-jared-kushner-ultimate-plan-israel-donald-trump-jerusalem-right-to-return-a8420836.html

        for your edification: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genocide#International_law

        … any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:

        (a) Killing members of the group;
        (b) Causing serious bodily harm, or harm to mental health, to members of the group;
        (c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
        (d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
        (e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

        if it walks and talks like a duck…it’s a duck. israel keeps chugging along, at the expense of palestinians.

      • DaBakr
        June 30, 2018, 1:52 am

        @an

        I’ll clarify. Thrive is too strong a word. In the West Bank the Arabs are certainly not privy to the services and infrastructure that Israeli citizens, Arab and jew receive in Israel or what you call settlement blocks. You do know that 100s of housing units in dozens of settlements are lived in by Palestinian families? However, the West Bank, despite rampant Palestinian corruption,(aided by corrupt israeli officials) has grown exponentially in the past decade of, let’s not call it peace, relative calm. The growth has been so substantial that most palestinians except for the most fanatical extremists are not willing to have what they’ve built destroyed by war.
        . Obviously not the same in Gaza. And I don’t think three is any need to go into specifics about all the how’s and why’s the West Bank could or should be actually thriving and enjoying more economic and social growth. It’s enough to say that blame is spread wide.
        . But again, Hamas presents a different situation. Better then what might replace it yet still oppressing its people with a violent iron grip on power, meaning media, military ops and the planning and sanctioning of most if not all attacks on Israel.

        Israel has never expressed a political, social or cultural inclination to destroy our rid itself of its Palestinian citizens or the Palestinian culture that exists outside of Israel.
        . But up north, in Syria, the Assad clan is defining a precise definition of genocide by indiscriminately bombing, gassing, torturing, shooting and removing and and all members of clans, tribes or sects that aren’t loyal to the Assad regime.

      • Annie Robbins
        June 30, 2018, 1:09 pm

        Israel has never expressed a political, social or cultural inclination to destroy our rid itself of its Palestinian citizens or the Palestinian culture that exists outside of Israel

        you’ve likely got a very narrow definition of expression.

        http://player

      • Maghlawatan
        June 30, 2018, 2:15 pm

        “Israel has never expressed a political, social or cultural inclination to destroy our rid itself of its Palestinian citizens or the Palestinian culture that exists outside of Israel.”

        Ethnic cleansing 1948
        Refusal rto allow people the right of return
        Sabra Shatola 1982
        Treat them like dogs. Moshe Dayan
        Use of banned weapons in Gaza
        Limiting calories in Gaza
        Blowing up sewage installations
        Blowing up hospitals

        Israel is barbaric

      • RoHa
        June 30, 2018, 7:44 pm

        “Israel has never expressed a political, social or cultural inclination to destroy our rid itself of its Palestinian citizens or the Palestinian culture that exists outside of Israel.”

        But does it anyway.

      • eljay
        June 30, 2018, 10:32 pm

        || @aar: … Israel has never expressed a political, social or cultural inclination to destroy our rid itself of its Palestinian citizens or the Palestinian culture that exists outside of Israel. … ||

        Israel has also never expressed any political, social or cultural inclination to embrace or incorporate Palestinian culture into its religion-supremacist “Jewish State” culture. Imagine that.

        || … But up north, in Syria, the Assad clan is defining a precise definition of genocide by indiscriminately bombing, gassing, torturing, shooting and removing and and all members of clans, tribes or sects that aren’t loyal to the Assad regime. ||

        Terrible stuff. But it’s nice to see you Zionists sticking to your “whataboutism” point that Israel – a “moral beacon” and “light unto the nations” state – isn’t as bad as the genocidal Assad regime.

        Seriously: Do you Zionists ever take a moment to think about just how stupid you look blatantly advocating supremacism but trying to pass it off as something morally reasonable?

    • bcg
      June 30, 2018, 9:57 am

      @DeBakr: There’s something I don’t understand about your viewpoint, maybe you could explain it.

      I believe the sun will rise in the east tomorrow. I believe this so strongly that I wouldn’t waste my time debating the issue with the western-sunrise crowd. I’m happy to let the western-sunrisers wallow in their delusions.

      So you believe the situation re Israel is stable, Israel is super duper strong, nothing will ever change, no one can force Israel to do anything, Israel has nukes, it’s the ancient homeland of the Jewish people, etc, etc. Well, fine, Debakr – why exactly are you reading Mondoweiss? What’s the point?

      • Mooser
        June 30, 2018, 12:27 pm

        “Well, fine, Debakr – why exactly are you reading Mondoweiss? What’s the point?”

        You are laboring under a misapprehension. “DaBakr” doesn’t ‘read’ Mondoweiss, he writes it!

      • DaBakr
        June 30, 2018, 2:22 pm

        @bc
        Because I can. The site can ban me anytime it wants. In the mean time what? You want your own sandbox to play in?

        (And pipe down moosr. everything will turn out fine. Relax)

      • Mooser
        July 2, 2018, 12:12 pm

        “The site can ban me anytime it wants.”

        We’ve been through this before, “DaBakr”. Mondo is under no obligation to do you any favors.

        But I don’t see what you are worried about, since your every word helps Zionism, and nothing you could possibly say will ever hurt Zionism or Israel.

    • Misterioso
      June 30, 2018, 11:01 am

      @DaBakr

      Reality:
      The entity known as “Israel” – 70 years of trying to pound a square peg into a round hole.

      All so predictable:

      Then Secretary of State for India and the British cabinet’s only Jewish member, Lord Edwin Montagu’s response to Prime Minister Lloyd George following issuance of the illegal (i.e., in violation of the established legal maxim Nemo dat quod non habet – nobody can give what he does not possess) 1917 Balfour Declaration: “All my life I have been trying to get out of the ghetto. You want to force me back there.”

      Henry Morgenthau Sr., renowned Jewish American and former U.S. Ambassador to Turkey, 1919: “Zionism is the most stupendous fallacy in Jewish history….The very fervour of my feeling for the oppressed of every race and every land, especially for the Jews, those of my own blood and faith, to whom I am bound by every tender tie, impels me to fight with all the greater force against this scheme, which my intelligence tells me can only lead them deeper into the mire of the past, while it professes to be leading them to the heights. Zionism is… a retrogression into the blackest error, and not progress toward the light.” (Quoted by Frank Epp, Whose Land is Palestine?, p. 261)

      Albert Einstein, 1939: “There could be no greater calamity than a permanent discord between us and the Arab people…. Let us recall that in former times no people lived in greater friendship with us than the ancestors of these Arabs.” (Einstein and Zionism by Banesh Hoffmann, in General Relativity and Gravitation, eds G. Shaviv and J. Rosen, Wiley, 1975, p. 242)

      Lessing J. Rosenwald, president of the American Council for Judaism, 1944: “The concept of a racial state – the Hitlerian concept- is repugnant to the civilized world, as witness the fearful global war in which we are involved. . . , I urge that we do nothing to set us back on the road to the past. To project at this time the creation of a Jewish state or commonwealth is to launch a singular innovation in world affairs which might well have incalculable consequences.”

      • DaBakr
        June 30, 2018, 2:18 pm

        @m

        Yes, I’ve heard the ‘irritating grain of sand in the oyster of the arab crescent’ complaint many times before. but is turning out to be a magnificent pearl and the oyster will have to deal with it

      • Jack Green
        June 30, 2018, 3:46 pm

        Jews had been persecuted for centuries in majority-gentile countries. Even when not actively persecuting the Jews, the majority-gentile countries refused to give refuge to the Jews when they needed it. There would have been no Holocaust if majority-gentile countries would have allowed in Jewish refugees who were escaping from the Nazis. The idea of Zionism was that Jews would return to their homeland & have a majority-Jewish country because majority-gentile countries had failed to provide safety for the Jews.

      • Mooser
        July 2, 2018, 12:18 pm

        “Jews had been persecuted for centuries in majority-gentile countries.” “Jack Green”

        No. 20 for this same exact comment. You are convinced this “Jews had been persecuted”schtik is gonna pay off big.

        What’s it supposed to get you?

      • eljay
        July 2, 2018, 1:34 pm

        || Jack Green: Jews had been persecuted for centuries in majority-gentile countries. … ||

        Homosexuals had been persecuted for centuries in majority-heterosexual countries. Acts of injustice and immorality committed against homosexuals and Jews did not and do not justify either:
        – acts of injustice and immorality committed by homosexuals or Jews; or
        – the establishment of a supremacist “Homosexual State” or “Jewish State”.

        || … The idea of Zionism was that Jews would … ||

        …establish a religion-supremacist “Jewish State” in as much as possible of Palestine. The idea of Zionism was unjust and immoral from its conception.

  3. Annie Robbins
    June 29, 2018, 11:52 am

    great article.

  4. Sibiriak
    June 29, 2018, 12:01 pm

    The ‘ultimate deal’ that Jared Kushner is proposing for Palestine would strip the people of all their dignity

    After three Arab-Israeli wars, tens of thousands of Palestinian deaths and millions of refugees, does Kushner really believe that the Palestinians will settle for cash?

    Robert Fisk
    https://www.independent.co.uk/voices/palestine-jared-kushner-ultimate-plan-israel-donald-trump-jerusalem-right-to-return-a8420836.html

    • Annie Robbins
      June 29, 2018, 10:27 pm

      it’s so grotesque sibiriak

    • Kay24
      June 30, 2018, 6:30 am

      Kushner, whose bed Netanyahu slept on, whose family sends thousands of dollars to illegal settlements, and who gave Jerusalem to the greedy zionists, pretending to be the honest broker is laughable. Kushner and those going along with this charade simply want to blame the Palestinians later on and say they were not “interested in peace”, after throwing breadcrumbs at them.

      The chances that Kushner, a flawed broker, will achieve peace, when many experienced, and qualified diplomats could not, is zero, especially when there is nothing left to offer the victims of this occupation.
      What a waste of tax payer money.

      • lonely rico
        June 30, 2018, 3:28 pm

        From Stanley Cohen’s assessment of Kushner’s diplomacy –

        https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/06/29/the-peace-deal-that-is-all-israel/

        Like his father-in-law, Jared Kushner is very much the burglar who would break into your home to steal your most precious belongings and then promise to return them in exchange for your child. Filled with hollow promise and little more, make no mistake about it. Kushner speaks to Palestine not just as a delivery boy for Donald Trump, but as a rubber stamp for Netanyahu and his age old colonial project. To the lot, the “grand” deal has nothing to do with the ends of justice but is all about personal partisan profit.

    • Citizen
      June 30, 2018, 8:39 pm

      Yes he does, especially cash in the form of regular electricity, potable water, medical access, a regular job, etc. Jared’s view of Palestinians is that of a slumlord towards the desperate renters in their buildings.

  5. Jane Porter
    June 29, 2018, 1:47 pm

    Imagine how low US and Europe’s policy supporting Israel’s aim to annex whole Palestine, and that they choose an real-estate company boss like Jared Kushner, from a family more well known in New-york as slums-lords to advance this plan. The United States and their European and Arab door-mats really show what they really are: a bunch of gangsters supporting by weapons and money their gangsters moldavian friends of Israel.

    If the UN and the IPC had any raison d’être, all these people should be tried and jailed in the Hague, like Milosevic and other international criminals.

    • DaBakr
      June 30, 2018, 1:56 am

      @j

      Israel has offered the West Bank Gaza and parts of East Jerusalem on many occasions in the past which were rejected for whatever reason by the palestinian leadership. you don’t get to cry now how evil Israel is for holding the land until a security agreement can be negotiated when the land has been offered and rejected so many times. but then, I’m sure y’all will find a way.

      • Annie Robbins
        June 30, 2018, 1:03 pm

        Israel has offered the West Bank Gaza and parts of East Jerusalem on many occasions in the past which were rejected

        the palestine papers ripped the mask off that lie https://www.aljazeera.com/palestinepapers/

      • DaBakr
        June 30, 2018, 2:15 pm

        @…

        Yup. It’s all one big conspiratorial lie. from the day Arafat threatened the world with his olive branch-machine gun speech and only dropped the branch, it’s all been a big lie.

      • Citizen
        June 30, 2018, 8:52 pm

        @DaKbar,

        Rejected “for whatever reason”–how sovereign is a state sans its own military forces? Since every Jew who lives & ever will live, no matter where born, has a right to return, why deny Palestinians their right to return? BTY, Israel negotiators have never once given their Palestinian counterparts an actual physical map of the land divisions they’ve proposed.

      • Talkback
        July 1, 2018, 7:54 am

        DaBakr: “… which were rejected for whatever reason …”

        Zionist negotiation: Give up your land and your rights or otherwise we call you rejectionists.

  6. lonely rico
    June 29, 2018, 7:51 pm

    Palestinians continue to reach watershed moments …

    watershed moments

    deir yassim
    gaza
    hebron

    GAZA

    zionist friends
    keep(s) chugging along.

    Thank you Dubakr

  7. Ossinev
    June 30, 2018, 7:24 am

    @DaBakr
    “there is in actuality-a stand off between a tenacious people that believe their cause will prevail against another tenacious people who have built a nation on their ancient homeland that includes the full civil rights of muslims, christians and other religions , races and sexual orientation. all the claims of colour ‘washing’ can’t erase the fact that this is how things are in an imperfect but thriving israel today”

    Mega bollocks.

  8. captADKer
    June 30, 2018, 9:57 am

    agonal at best by my humble interpretation.

    • Mooser
      June 30, 2018, 9:47 pm

      “agonal at best by my humble interpretation.”

      You’re right, “Capt”. Why, I can almost hear the rattling in Zionisms throat.

  9. Nathan
    July 1, 2018, 9:04 pm

    “This will make it impossible for there to be any separation in the future, for there to be any independent Palestinian entity…”

    It seems that Mr Juma’ is complaining that there will not be any separation (allowing for an independent Palestinian state). On the other hand the caption next to the photo tells us that “Jamal Juma’ leads a nonviolent march against the Israeli Separation Wall in the West Bank town of Al Walaja”.

    It seems to me that there must be some innocent error in the article. Either Mr Juma’ should be quoted as telling us that “the good news is that there won’t be any separation which we absolutely oppose…” (and therefore he is protesting the separation wall at Walaja) – or the caption should be changed, informing us that the demonstration is expressing its support of the wall (and the hope of separation in the future).

    Obviously, it must be an oversight on the part of the editing to give us a contradictory message in such a short article. It just can’t be that the same person is complaining that there won’t be a separation AND then he appears leading a demonstration against the separation.

    • Sibiriak
      July 1, 2018, 11:45 pm

      Nathan: It just can’t be that the same person is complaining that there won’t be a separation AND then he appears leading a demonstration against the separation.
      ———————————————————————-

      Allow me to clear up your (willful) confusion. The demonstration is NOT against a separation that would allow a fully independent and viable Palestinian state. Rather the demonstration is against the Apartheid Wall which in fact PREVENTS such separation and independence.

      Jamal Juma’: It is clear that the wall was designed to isolate and lay siege to Palestinians.

      To “isolate and lay siege” is a far cry from to separate in order to allow the creation of an independent Palestinian state.

      Jamal Juma’: The project to place Palestinians under siege by means of the wall has been completed. It closed off all the dynamic areas that Israel considered necessary to isolate various areas. Eighty percent of the Wall is within the West Bank.

      The second part of the siege is reinforcement of the settlements. Each settlement has what Israel calls a buffer zone – a security apparatus consisting of barbed wire and roads that Palestinians are not allowed to use. This, together with the alternative (bypass) roads (which we call the apartheid roads), allows them to control the territory. Today there are two road networks: one is for Israeli settlers, about 1,400 km long, and its purpose is to connect all settlements to one another and to Israel in a kind of network.

      So the Apartheid Wall works together with settlement expansion and the imposition of an apartheid occupation regime (dual system of law, dual road system, buffered settlement projects, checkpoints, military control etc.). To repeat: it is NOT designed to separate a Palestinian state from Israel. Just the opposite: it is designed to PREVENT a Palestinian state from coming a reality.

      Jamal Juma’: When you talk about Ariel, Ma’ale Adumim, and so on, it will be as though the entire West Bank is a suburb of Tel Aviv. This will make it impossible for there to be any separation in the future, for there to be any independent Palestinian entity; instead, an apartheid system of cantons will be imposed on Palestinians.

      Since the Apartheid Wall works together with the apartheid settlements, apartheid roads, etc. to create an apartheid system of cantons, there is absolutely no contradiction in opposing that wall and pointing out that such an apartheid system (supported by the wall) precludes an independent Palestinian state.

      • Jack Green
        July 3, 2018, 10:05 am

        Palestinians were coming into Israel & murdering innocent Israelis. The wall was built to save the lives of innocent Israelis.

      • Talkback
        July 3, 2018, 2:31 pm

        Jack Green: “Palestinians were coming into Israel & murdering innocent Israelis.”

        Quite the contrary. Jewish settlers came into Palestine and murdering and expelling innocent Nonjews.

        Jack Green: “The wall was built to save the lives of innocent Israelis.”

        Israeli civilians settling in occupied territories are not innocent, but criminals.

  10. lenny
    July 2, 2018, 6:38 pm

    Watershed moment in a drought.
    this fake mondoweiss page with its security revoked is a hoot itzik.

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