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Occupation, in the details (Part II)

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Part II of my travelog continues to show surveillance and the indignities of daily life. The first part can be viewed here.

No blood or high drama, so it’s nothing “newsworthy.” It’s just everyday life.

(Image: Katie Miranda)

A girl walks to school through a olive grove. Normally a beautiful and pastoral scene, but in Palestine it’s punctuated by razor wire, an ever present reminder of who is in charge.

(Image: Katie Miranda)

In Hebron a man is detained under an Israeli guard post, sometimes for 15 minutes, sometimes for 3 hours. No one knows how long it will take, and it’s a reminder that your life is not your own; the army exerts absolute control over the day to day life of Palestinians. Makes me wonder, at the end of an average Palestinian’s life, how many days or years have been stolen by the Israeli government?

(Image: Katie Miranda)

Another normal day in Tel Rumeida and a reminder that the streets in their neighborhood are not their own. Even when no one is in the street, you’re always being watched.

The original illustrations are for sale on my website.

I’m hosting an Open Studios + a Report Back from Palestine in Portland, Oregon where these and other illustrations and paintings will be on display. Details can be found here.

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I like your sensibility, Katie. Thank you.

Go Katie!

Katie, you have done a wonderful job capturing the putrid essence of occupation. Thank you.

PETITION:

http://www.workingforpeaceandjustice.org/no_new_settlement_units?utm_campaign=31_new_units&utm_medium=email&utm_source=wpj

“No New Settlement Units in Hebron
Israel has approved 31 new settlement units to be built on Shuhada Street in Hebron. If construction goes through, they will be the first new units in Hebron in 15 years. They will increase the settler population by 20%.

“The permit for the new units was granted under the Civil Administration’s Subcommittee for Licensing. It was approved under certain conditions, including the right of the public to object.”